8 research outputs found

    James Addison Baker portrait

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    This photograph of Capt. James A. Baker is part of the Vera Prasilova Scott portraiture collection. Scott was a studio photographer and the wife of a Rice faculty member. She took portraits of many prominent Houstonians in the late 1920s and early 1930s.Baker practiced law in Houston, where he eventually headed Baker, Botts, Andrews, and Wharton, a 100-year-old law firm (later to be known as Baker Botts). After the Commercial National Bank, which he organized, merged with South Texas National Bank, he became chairman of the board. He was founder and board member of the Houston Gas Company, organizer and first president of the Guardian Trust Company, and one of the organizers of the Galveston, Houston and Henderson Railway and the Southwestern Drug Company. Baker was also president of the Houston Bar Association and a member of the Philosophical Society of Texas and the Presbyterian Church. He won special renown as the personal attorney of William Marsh Rice in the litigation concerning Rice's will, which left Rice Institute a trust fund. Baker, as an executor of the will, was instrumental in proving that Rice had been murdered and that a second will, leaving the bulk of Rice's estate to Albert Patrick, was forged. He then became the first chairman of the board of trustees for the institute and served in that capacity until his death. Baker died in Houston on August 2, 1941, and was buried there in Glenwood Cemetery. (excerpted from Handbook of Texas Online, http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/BB/fba28.html, accessed April 9, 2007

    Gwendolyn Garrow Hutcheson portrait

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    This photograph of Gwendolyn Garrow Hutcheson is part of the Vera Prasilova Scott portraiture collection. Scott was a studio photographer and the wife of a Rice faculty member. She took portraits of many prominent Houstonians in the late 1920s and early 1930s.Gwendolyn Garrow Hutcheson was the wife of Palmer Hutcheson, prominent Houston attorney. He graduated from the University of Texas School of law in 1938. In 1946 he joined with family members to form the law firm Hutcheson and Grundy

    Nina J. Cullinan portrait

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    This photograph of Nina Cullinan is part of the Vera Prasilova Scott portraiture collection. Scott was a studio photographer and the wife of a Rice faculty member. She took portraits of many prominent Houstonians in the late 1920s and early 1930s.Nina J. Cullinan was a patron of Houston arts and parks. She was a founding member of the Contemporary Arts Museum, the Society For Performing Arts, and the Houston Ballet Foundation. She also served on boards of the Museum of Fine Arts, the Municipal Arts Commission, the Fine Arts Advisory Council of the University of Texas, and the American Federation of Art. She was a leading benefactor of the Houston Symphony Orchestra. In the 1950s she funded the building of the Cullinan Hall of the Museum of Fine Arts, designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. (excerpted from Handbook of Texas Online entry for Nina J. Cullinan, http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/CC/fcu46.html (accessed May 21, 2007).

    Caroline Wiess Law portrait

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    This photograph of Caroline Wiess Law is part of the Vera Prasilova Scott portraiture collection. Scott was a studio photographer and the wife of a Rice faculty member. She took portraits of many prominent Houstonians in the late 1920s and early 1930s.Caroline Wiess Law was an oil heiress and art collector, and a major philanthropist in Houston. She is perhaps best known for her endowment bequests to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, including donations of works of art by great artists such as Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, Joan Miro, Jackson Pollock, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol and Robert Motherwell—to name a few. In 1998 the Museum honoured her 40-year commitment as a passionate and dedicated supporter by renaming the main building in her honour. Wiess also supported programs at Baylor College of Medicine, in Houston, and University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, also in Houston. She is the granddaughter of Louisa Elizabeth Carothers Wiess, benefactress of Southwestern University, and is the daughter of Harry Carothers Wiess and Olga Kieth, benefactors of Rice University

    Palmer Hutcheson portrait

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    This photograph of Palmer Hutcheson is part of the Vera Prasilova Scott portraiture collection. Scott was a studio photographer and the wife of a Rice faculty member. She took portraits of many prominent Houstonians in the late 1920s and early 1930s.Palmer Hutcheson Jr. was a fifth generation Texan and a prominent Houston attorney. He graduated from the University of Texas School of law in 1938. In 1946 he joined with family members to form the law firm Hutcheson and Grundy

    Kenneth Franzheim portrait

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    This photograph of Kenneth Franzheim is part of the Vera Prasilova Scott portraiture collection. Scott was a studio photographer and the wife of a Rice faculty member. She took portraits of many prominent Houstonians in the late 1920s and early 1930s.Architect Kenneth Franzheim's major buildings in Houston were the seventeen-story Humble Tower (1936, with Staub, later became the Exxon Building); the second Hermann Hospital and the Hermann Professional Building (1949, with Hedrick and Lindsley); the eighteen-story Prudential Building (1952); the twenty-one-story Texas National Bank building (1955); and the twenty-four-story Bank of the Southwest building (1956). Franzheim's best known Houston building was Foley's Department Store (1947, 1957), for which he won an Award of Merit from the American Institute of Architects in 1950. Franzheim was particularly interested in incorporating works of art in his architecture, and this led to collaboration with the artists Wheeler Williams, Peter Hurd, Leo Friedlander, and Rufino Tamayo. Franzheim was the first chairman of the board of the Allied Arts Association of Houston and was an honorary member of the National Sculpture Society

    Jane Blaffer portrait

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    This photograph of Jane Blaffer (later Jane Blaffer Owen) is part of the Vera Prasilova Scott portraiture collection. Scott was a studio photographer and the wife of a Rice faculty member. She took portraits of many prominent Houstonians in the late 1920s and early 1930s.Philanthropist and patron of the arts Jane Blaffer Owen is the daughter of Robert E. Lee Blaffer, one of the founders of Humble Oil and Refining Company. Owen was the first president of the Allied Arts Council of Houston. She has served on the boards of directors of the Houston Symphony Society and Contemporary Arts Association. She was honored March 13, 2007 with the Sachem (SAY-shum) award during a ceremony in the Indiana state house rotunda. Gov. Mitch Daniels presented the award to Mrs. Blaffer-Owen for her lifetime of work preserving and promoting the historical and educational attributes of New Harmony, Indiana through the Robert Lee Blaffer Foundation she created in 1958

    Jane Blaffer portrait with hat

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    This photograph of Jane Blaffer (later Jane Blaffer Owen) is part of the Vera Prasilova Scott portraiture collection. Scott was a studio photographer and the wife of a Rice faculty member. She took portraits of many prominent Houstonians in the late 1920s and early 1930s.Philanthropist and patron of the arts Jane Blaffer Owen is the daughter of Robert E. Lee Blaffer, one of the founders of Humble Oil and Refining Company. Owen was the first president of the Allied Arts Council of Houston. She has served on the boards of directors of the Houston Symphony Society and Contemporary Arts Association. She was honored March 13, 2007 with the Sachem (SAY-shum) award during a ceremony in the Indiana state house rotunda. Gov. Mitch Daniels presented the award to Mrs. Blaffer-Owen for her lifetime of work preserving and promoting the historical and educational attributes of New Harmony, Indiana through the Robert Lee Blaffer Foundation she created in 1958
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