10 research outputs found

    Factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes among adults with diabetes: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

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    AimsTo investigate sociodemographic and health factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes among adults with diabetes in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).MethodsAmong 3384 adults with self-reported diabetes or undiagnosed diabetes in the baseline HCHS/SOL, we estimated odds ratios (OR) of being undiagnosed for demographic, cultural, access to care, and health factors.ResultsAmong individuals with diabetes, 37.0% were undiagnosed. After adjustment and compared to people of Mexican heritage, people of Cuban and South American heritage had 60% (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.02-2.50) and 91% (OR = 1.91, 1.16-3.14) higher odds of being undiagnosed, respectively. Individuals with a higher odds of being undiagnosed were women (OR = 1.64, 1.26-2.13), those with no health insurance (OR = 1.31, 1.00-1.71), individuals who received no healthcare in the past year (OR = 3.59, 2.49-5.16), those who were overweight (vs. normal weight) (OR = 1.60, 1.02-2.50), and those with dyslipidemia (OR = 1.38, 1.10-1.74). Individuals with lower odds of being undiagnosed were those with a family history of diabetes (OR = 0.54, 0.43-0.68), and those with hypertension (OR = 0.46, 0.36-0.58).ConclusionsVariation by Hispanic heritage group, sex, and access to medical care highlight where concentrated efforts are need to improve diabetes awareness. Our findings will inform clinical and public health practices to improve diabetes awareness among vulnerable populations

    Factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes among adults with diabetes: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

    No full text
    AimsTo investigate sociodemographic and health factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes among adults with diabetes in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).MethodsAmong 3384 adults with self-reported diabetes or undiagnosed diabetes in the baseline HCHS/SOL, we estimated odds ratios (OR) of being undiagnosed for demographic, cultural, access to care, and health factors.ResultsAmong individuals with diabetes, 37.0% were undiagnosed. After adjustment and compared to people of Mexican heritage, people of Cuban and South American heritage had 60% (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.02-2.50) and 91% (OR = 1.91, 1.16-3.14) higher odds of being undiagnosed, respectively. Individuals with a higher odds of being undiagnosed were women (OR = 1.64, 1.26-2.13), those with no health insurance (OR = 1.31, 1.00-1.71), individuals who received no healthcare in the past year (OR = 3.59, 2.49-5.16), those who were overweight (vs. normal weight) (OR = 1.60, 1.02-2.50), and those with dyslipidemia (OR = 1.38, 1.10-1.74). Individuals with lower odds of being undiagnosed were those with a family history of diabetes (OR = 0.54, 0.43-0.68), and those with hypertension (OR = 0.46, 0.36-0.58).ConclusionsVariation by Hispanic heritage group, sex, and access to medical care highlight where concentrated efforts are need to improve diabetes awareness. Our findings will inform clinical and public health practices to improve diabetes awareness among vulnerable populations

    Perceived Discrimination and Adherence to Medical Care in a Racially Integrated Community

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    BACKGROUND: Past research indicates that access to health care and utilization of services varies by sociodemographic characteristics, but little is known about racial differences in health care utilization within racially integrated communities. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether perceived discrimination was associated with delays in seeking medical care and adherence to medical care recommendations among African Americans and whites living in a socioeconomically homogenous and racially integrated community. DESIGN: A cross-sectional analysis from the Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities Study. PARTICIPANTS: Study participants include 1,408 African-American (59.3%) and white (40.7%) adults (≥18 years) in Baltimore, Md. MEASUREMENTS: An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to assess the associations of perceived discrimination with help-seeking behavior for and adherence to medical care. RESULTS: For both African Americans and whites, a report of 1–2 and >2 discrimination experiences in one’s lifetime were associated with more medical care delays and nonadherence compared to those with no experiences after adjustment for need, enabling, and predisposing factors (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 2.6; OR = 2.2, 3.3, respectively; all P < .05). Results were similar for perceived discrimination occurring in the past year. CONCLUSIONS: Experiences with discrimination were associated with delays in seeking medical care and poor adherence to medical care recommendations INDEPENDENT OF NEED, ENABLING, AND PREDISPOSING FACTORS, INCLUDING MEDICAL MISTRUST; however, a prospective study is needed. Further research in this area should include exploration of other potential mechanisms for the association between perceived discrimination and health service utilization
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