39 research outputs found

    Localities of Uruguay including an overview of the geographical distribution of fascioliasis infection risk.

    No full text
    <p><b>A.</b> Location of Uruguay in South America. <b>B.</b> Map of Uruguay showing localities and departments of Montevideo, Salto, PaysandĂș and Canelones where the fasciolid flukes and the lymnaeid snails were collected. Other departments highlighted are those where most of the human fascioliasis cases have been reported. Dots correspond to farms where more than 20% of the cattle was known to be infected by <i>Fasciola hepatica</i> according to data from the 1972–1973 period (modified from [<a href="http://www.plosntds.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005352#pntd.0005352.ref037" target="_blank">37</a>]).</p

    Livestock movement timeline in the early introduction and spread of <i>Fasciola hepatica</i> and lymnaeids in Uruguay.

    No full text
    <p>Maps of South America (<b>A</b>) and Uruguay (<b>B</b>) showing main livestock passageways during the early Spanish and Portuguese colonizations. The analysis concerns the time of the old Viceroyalty of Rio de la Plata, from Buenos Aires in the South and the "Banda Oriental" in the Southeast up to "Alto Peru" in the North. 1, 14, First introductions of pigs in 1541, horses in 1574, and goats in 1577; 2, 15, 16, First and second introduction of cattle derived from Corrientes population in 1611 and 1617; 3, 17, Introduction of cattle from Misiones by Jesuits at the beginning of 17th century; 4, 5, 18, 19, First introduction of sheep from Santa Fe in 1727 (4, 18) and subsequent large scale cattle introductions with "faeneros" from Asuncion, Corrientes and Santa Fe (4, 5, 18, 19); 6, Livestock route for silver transport from Potosi mines from mid 16th century; 7, Original route for introduced goats in 1611–1618; 8, 20, Introduction of sheep by the Portuguese in 1734–1735; 9, 21, Largest rustle of more than 400,000 cattle in 1705, from Vaqueria del Mar to Vaqueria de los Pinares, at the southern part of the Jesuit Misiones Orientales area (brownish area); 10, 22, Livestock spread at mid and end of 17th century; 11, Livestock route (Camino Real, Ruta del Viamont or Caminho do ViamĂŁo) for gold transport from Minas Geraes mines from 1690; 12, Interconnection livestock route (Ruta de las Misiones or Caminho das MissĂ”es); 13, Interconnection livestock route (Ruta de la VaquerĂ­a or Caminho da Vacaria); 23, Groups of Portuguese "bandeirantes" also using livestock; 24, Northward spread of livestock. Background for A from composed satellite map of South America orthographic projection by NASA (full resolution of 1,215 x 1,712 pixels; public domain) via Wikimedia Commons. Original S. Mas-Coma.</p

    Differences found in mtDNA <i>cox</i>1 gene of <i>Fasciola hepatica</i> from Uruguay and other haplotypes.

    No full text
    <p>In the position where two or three different nucleotides or amino acids are noted, the first (noted with capital letter) is the majority one for <i>F</i>. <i>hepatica</i> intraspecific variation. Position = numbers (to be read in vertical) refer to variable positions obtained in the alignment made with MEGA 6.0.6;. = identical; * = present paper. ** 69 <i>F</i>. <i>hepatica</i> haplotypes described in Mas-Coma et al., 2009 [<a href="http://www.plosntds.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005352#pntd.0005352.ref006" target="_blank">6</a>] (39 populations from 10 countries); haplotype Accesion Number (Acc. No.) M93388 from Salt Lake City, Utah, USA of Garey and Wolstenholme, 1989 [<a href="http://www.plosntds.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005352#pntd.0005352.ref082" target="_blank">82</a>], and the haplotype Acc. No. AF216697 corresponding to the Geelon strain from Australia of Le et al., 2001 [<a href="http://www.plosntds.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005352#pntd.0005352.ref083" target="_blank">83</a>]. Nt = nucleotide base pair; aa = amino acids.</p

    Differences found in mtDNA <i>cox</i>1 of <i>Lymnaea neotropica</i> from Uruguay and other haplotypes.

    No full text
    <p>Position = numbers (to be read in vertical) refer to variable positions obtained in the alignment made with MEGA 6.0.6;. = identical; ** = present paper. Haplotype codes only provisional due to incomplete sequences of the gene. *GenBank and country/locality noted in parentheses: 1 = AM494008 from Peru: Lima; Cajamarca; 2 = FN356741 from Argentina: Mendoza; 3 = JF461485 from Venezuela: Carabobo; 4 = JF461486 from Venezuela: Falcon; 5 = KT215350 from Argentina: Catamarca; 6 = KT215350 from Uruguay: Paysandu, Montevideo; 7 = AM49008 from Uruguay: Canelones.</p

    Differences found in mtDNA <i>nad</i>1 gene of <i>Fasciola hepatica</i> from Uruguay and other haplotypes.

    No full text
    <p>In the position where two or three different nucleotides or amino acids are noted, the first (noted with capital letter) is the majority one for <i>F</i>. <i>hepatica</i> intraspecific variation. Position = numbers (to be read in vertical) refer to variable positions obtained in the alignment made with MEGA 6.0.6;. = identical; * = present paper. ** 51 <i>F</i>. <i>hepatica</i> haplotypes described in Mas-Coma et al., 2009 [<a href="http://www.plosntds.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005352#pntd.0005352.ref006" target="_blank">6</a>] (39 populations from 10 countries); haplotype Acc. No. M93388 from Salt Lake City, Utah, USA of Garey and Wolstenholme, 1989 [<a href="http://www.plosntds.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005352#pntd.0005352.ref082" target="_blank">82</a>], and the haplotype Ac. No. AF216697 corresponding to the Geelon strain from Australia of Le et al., 2001 [<a href="http://www.plosntds.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005352#pntd.0005352.ref083" target="_blank">83</a>]. Nt = nucleotide base pair; aa = amino acids.</p

    Light microscopy of third stage larvae (L3) morphologically compatible with <i>Angiostrongylus cantonensis</i>, obtained from <i>Theba pisana</i>.

    No full text
    <p>General view of third-stage larvae with one sheath (<i>S</i>). A characteristic “T”-shaped structure (<i>TS</i>) is apparent at the anterior end of the sheath that surrounds the L3 larva (a). Posterior end of L3 larva with anus (<i>A</i>) at subterminal position. Anus cuticle (<i>AC</i>) is completely molted and can be seen on the sheath (b). Anterior end of L3 larva with esophagus bulbus (<i>EB</i>), excretory pore (<i>EP</i>) and nervous ring (<i>NR</i>) (c).</p
    corecore