9,158 research outputs found

    Cruciferous vegetable intake and cardiovascular disease risk in the Framingham Offspring Cohort

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    Fruit and vegetable intake has been demonstrated to be inversely correlated with CVD risk, but it remains to be elucidated whether different subclasses of fruits and vegetables and their bioactive constituents have different effects on CVD risk. Cruciferous vegetables have garnered increasing attention over the years, as evidence for their protective role in cancer and other chronic diseases has grown. However, since studies examining associations between cruciferous vegetable intake and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are limited and some results are conflicting, we used data from the Framingham Offspring Study starting with examination 5 (N=2902) to evaluate the association between cruciferous vegetable intake and carefully adjudicated cardiovascular outcomes, cruciferous vegetable consumption was classified into 4 categories; <1, 1-<3, 3-<6, and 6+ one-half cup servings per week. Cox proportional hazard models were used to adjust for potential confounding; the final model contained baseline BMI, age, smoking status, alcohol intake (drinks per day), total fruit and vegetable intake, and trans fatty acid intake. Follow up continued for three consecutive 4-year exam cycles. Using <1.0 serving/week as the referent category, the hazard ratios (HR) for CVD declined in a dose-response manner with cruciferous vegetable intake (HR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.64-0.98; HR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.61-1.01; and HR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.45-0.98, respectively. In sex-stratified analysis, the strongest effects were found in men consuming 6+ servings per week (HR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.24 – 0.98). HR estimates also declined in women, but with less of a dose-response pattern. Overall, these data suggests that there is an inverse association between cruciferous vegetable intake and CVD risk in both men and women

    The Refugee Crisis & The Responsibility Of Intellectuals

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    According to the UN, 65.3 million forcibly displaced people languish in camps and slums or making desperate journeys toward safety. The global community has not only failed to help many of these people; in many cases it has actively obstructed them from finding security and a new home for themselves and their families. Moral responsibilities to refugees are not exhausted by policies and actions. They also extend to how to think about the refugee crisis. Pundits, politicians, and political philosophers have failed to live up to these responsibilities by perpetuating populist myths, the causes of refugees’ flight, and the policies that prevent them from resuming their lives

    The Betrayal of Judgment

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    Interrogating the Migration Industry

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    Review of Ruben Andersson,Illegality, Inc. (Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2014)and Amy Nethery and Stephanie J. Silverman(eds.), Immigration Detention: The Migration of a Policy and its Human Impact.(London and New York: Routledge, 2015

    The Betrayal of Judgment

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    Courting Disaster

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    Thin Constitutions and the Good Society

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