6 research outputs found

    Is it possible to photoperiod manipulate spawning time in planktivorous fish ? A long-term experiment on Atlantic herring

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    The oocyte development (vitellogenesis) of individual fish is highly dependent upon their physiology which is influenced by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Thus, if individuals encounter poor biophysical conditions, they will likely be unable to reproduce. The photoperiod is an external factor that is constant between years but with increasing intra-annual (seasonal) variation polewards. In high-latitude marine environments, several ecological processes are strongly photic entrained, e.g., the planktonic spring bloom. However, it is still unclear whether day length or planktonic peaks (feeding opportunity) is the main timer or regulator behind gametogenesis not only for teleost piscivores but also for planktivores living in these waters. Hence, we experimentally investigated the role of photoperiod steering vitellogenesis in the planktivorous Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), rearing larvae up to the mature adult stage. We imposed a natural and 6-month offset photoperiod hypothesising that vitellogenesis is entrained by this photic zeitgeber. The results of our experiment clearly demonstrated that herring have a strong photic zeitgeber acting upon vitellogenesis according to the experienced photoperiod. Thus, the Offset Group showed a displacement in vitellogenesis of 6 months. The second hypothesis that feeding opportunities play a clear role in assisting this photic zeitgeber in Atlantic herring could be rejected. This clarification supports that the survival potential of the larvae is the main selection pressure in operation in these respects, i.e., rather than the extent of feeding opportunities of the adults

    Brazilian Flora 2020: Leveraging the power of a collaborative scientific network

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    International audienceThe shortage of reliable primary taxonomic data limits the description of biological taxa and the understanding of biodiversity patterns and processes, complicating biogeographical, ecological, and evolutionary studies. This deficit creates a significant taxonomic impediment to biodiversity research and conservation planning. The taxonomic impediment and the biodiversity crisis are widely recognized, highlighting the urgent need for reliable taxonomic data. Over the past decade, numerous countries worldwide have devoted considerable effort to Target 1 of the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC), which called for the preparation of a working list of all known plant species by 2010 and an online world Flora by 2020. Brazil is a megadiverse country, home to more of the world's known plant species than any other country. Despite that, Flora Brasiliensis, concluded in 1906, was the last comprehensive treatment of the Brazilian flora. The lack of accurate estimates of the number of species of algae, fungi, and plants occurring in Brazil contributes to the prevailing taxonomic impediment and delays progress towards the GSPC targets. Over the past 12‚ÄČyears, a legion of taxonomists motivated to meet Target 1 of the GSPC, worked together to gather and integrate knowledge on the algal, plant, and fungal diversity of Brazil. Overall, a team of about 980 taxonomists joined efforts in a highly collaborative project that used cybertaxonomy to prepare an updated Flora of Brazil, showing the power of scientific collaboration to reach ambitious goals. This paper presents an overview of the Brazilian Flora 2020 and provides taxonomic and spatial updates on the algae, fungi, and plants found in one of the world's most biodiverse countries. We further identify collection gaps and summarize future goals that extend beyond 2020. Our results show that Brazil is home to 46,975 native species of algae, fungi, and plants, of which 19,669 are endemic to the country. The data compiled to date suggests that the Atlantic Rainforest might be the most diverse Brazilian domain for all plant groups except gymnosperms, which are most diverse in the Amazon. However, scientific knowledge of Brazilian diversity is still unequally distributed, with the Atlantic Rainforest and the Cerrado being the most intensively sampled and studied biomes in the country. In times of ‚Äúscientific reductionism‚ÄĚ, with botanical and mycological sciences suffering pervasive depreciation in recent decades, the first online Flora of Brazil 2020 significantly enhanced the quality and quantity of taxonomic data available for algae, fungi, and plants from Brazil. This project also made all the information freely available online, providing a firm foundation for future research and for the management, conservation, and sustainable use of the Brazilian funga and flora

    Is it possible to photoperiod manipulate spawning time in planktivorous fish ? A long-term experiment on Atlantic herring

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    The oocyte development (vitellogenesis) of individual fish is highly dependent upon their physiology which is influenced by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Thus, if individuals encounter poor biophysical conditions, they will likely be unable to reproduce. The photoperiod is an external factor that is constant between years but with increasing intra-annual (seasonal) variation polewards. In high-latitude marine environments, several ecological processes are strongly photic entrained, e.g., the planktonic spring bloom. However, it is still unclear whether day length or planktonic peaks (feeding opportunity) is the main timer or regulator behind gametogenesis not only for teleost piscivores but also for planktivores living in these waters. Hence, we experimentally investigated the role of photoperiod steering vitellogenesis in the planktivorous Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), rearing larvae up to the mature adult stage. We imposed a natural and 6-month offset photoperiod hypothesising that vitellogenesis is entrained by this photic zeitgeber. The results of our experiment clearly demonstrated that herring have a strong photic zeitgeber acting upon vitellogenesis according to the experienced photoperiod. Thus, the Offset Group showed a displacement in vitellogenesis of 6 months. The second hypothesis that feeding opportunities play a clear role in assisting this photic zeitgeber in Atlantic herring could be rejected. This clarification supports that the survival potential of the larvae is the main selection pressure in operation in these respects, i.e., rather than the extent of feeding opportunities of the adults.publishedVersio

    Is it possible to photoperiod manipulate spawning time in planktivorous fish ? A long-term experiment on Atlantic herring

    Get PDF
    The oocyte development (vitellogenesis) of individual fish is highly dependent upon their physiology which is influenced by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Thus, if individuals encounter poor biophysical conditions, they will likely be unable to reproduce. The photoperiod is an external factor that is constant between years but with increasing intra-annual (seasonal) variation polewards. In high-latitude marine environments, several ecological processes are strongly photic entrained, e.g., the planktonic spring bloom. However, it is still unclear whether day length or planktonic peaks (feeding opportunity) is the main timer or regulator behind gametogenesis not only for teleost piscivores but also for planktivores living in these waters. Hence, we experimentally investigated the role of photoperiod steering vitellogenesis in the planktivorous Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), rearing larvae up to the mature adult stage. We imposed a natural and 6-month offset photoperiod hypothesising that vitellogenesis is entrained by this photic zeitgeber. The results of our experiment clearly demonstrated that herring have a strong photic zeitgeber acting upon vitellogenesis according to the experienced photoperiod. Thus, the Offset Group showed a displacement in vitellogenesis of 6 months. The second hypothesis that feeding opportunities play a clear role in assisting this photic zeitgeber in Atlantic herring could be rejected. This clarification supports that the survival potential of the larvae is the main selection pressure in operation in these respects, i.e., rather than the extent of feeding opportunities of the adults

    Allelopathy, an alternative tool to improve cropping systems. A review

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