320 research outputs found

    Reducing ceiling effects in the Working Alliance Inventory-Rehabilitation Dutch Version

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    Purpose: To reduce ceiling effects on domain scores (Task, Goal, and Bond) of the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI)-Rehabilitation Dutch Version by changing response scales and using Visual Analogue Scales (VASs). Methods: Clients, who had at least three treatment sessions prior, randomly received one of the three versions of the WAI-Rehabilitation Dutch Version, using items with a balanced Likert scale, Positive-Packed Likert scale or VAS. Primary outcome was percentage of ceiling effects in total- and domain scores, secondary outcomes were construct validity and internal consistency of the three versions. Results: One hundred and seventy-six clients randomly received a set of questionnaires (one of the three versions of the WAI-Rehabilitation Dutch Version, Session Rating Scale (SRS) and Helping Alliance Questionnaire (HAQ)-II); 152 participants (mean age 51.5 ± 16.3, 106 women) returned the questionnaires. No ceiling effects were present in the total scores of all versions. Significantly fewer ceiling effects were found in the VAS-Version (Goal: 8.0%, Bond: 7.7%) compared to the original (Goal: 18.0%, Bond: 29.8%) and Positive-Packed Version (Goal: 27.1%, Bond: 29.8%). Spearman’s correlations between VAS-Version, SRS and HAQ-II ranged 0.747–0.845. Conclusions: Visual Analogue Scales effectively reduced ceiling effects on domain scores of the WAI-Rehabilitation Dutch Version, while maintaining validity.Implications for RehabilitationVisual Analogue Scales effectively reduced ceiling effects on domain scores of the Working Alliance Inventory-Rehabilitation Dutch Version, while maintaining construct validity.The Working Alliance Inventory version with Visual Analogue Scales can be used in rehabilitation. Visual Analogue Scales effectively reduced ceiling effects on domain scores of the Working Alliance Inventory-Rehabilitation Dutch Version, while maintaining construct validity. The Working Alliance Inventory version with Visual Analogue Scales can be used in rehabilitation.</p

    How has the dental literature evolved over time?:Analyzing 20 years of journal self-citation rates and impact factors

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    Objective: As journal impact factors (IFs) can be artificially inflated by excessive journal self-citation practices, research quality evaluation based solely on IF ranking may be manipulated and, therefore, ethically challenged. This study aimed to analyze the longitudinal development of journal self-citation rates (SCRs) and IFs in dental literature and to determine possible confounders.Methods: Twenty-eight journals with scope within general dentistry and (sub)specialties listed in 1997-2016 Journal of Citation Reports® were scrutinized. The following information was retrieved: publication year, total number of citations, number of self-citations, IF, corrected IF, and SCR.Results: Endodontic journals had the highest SCR (median = 35.3, IQR = 21.6-47.5), journals related to periodontics had the lowest (median = 14.7, IQR = 8.9-25.5). Periodontics had the highest IF (median = 2.1, IQR= 1.7-2.8) and general dentistry had the lowest (median = 0.9, IQR = 0.7-1.2). SCR significantly decreased over time (p < .0001) by 1 unit per year. Additionally, 1 unit increase in corrected IF resulted in 15.2 units decrease in SCR. IFs significantly increased 0.06 units per year (p < .000).Conclusions: Overall, favourable changes in citation metrics have been observed for dental journals during the 20-year observation period. SCR significantly decreased per observation year whereas IFs significantly increased, indicating a healthy publishing environment in the dental literature. SCR was regulated both by time and corrected IF

    Fitting transtibial and transfemoral prostheses in persons with a severe flexion contracture:problems and solutions - a systematic review

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    PURPOSE: In persons with a hip or knee flexion contracture ≥25°, fitting a prosthesis is said to be difficult. This systematic review aims to assess the evidence for fitting of a prosthesis in persons with a severe contracture (≥25°) after a lower limb amputation. METHOD: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, CINAHL, and Orthotics & Prosthetics Virtual Library databases were searched from inception to December 2019, using database specific search terms related to amputation, prosthesis, and contracture. Reference lists of included studies were checked for relevant studies. Quality of the included studies was assessed using the critical appraisal checklist for case reports (Joanna Briggs Institute). RESULTS: In total, 13 case studies provided evidence for fitting of a prosthesis in more than 63 persons with a transtibial amputation and three with a transfemoral amputation, all of whom had a hip or knee flexion contracture ≥25°. Some studies found a reduction in contractures after prosthesis use. CONCLUSIONS: Several techniques for fitting a prosthesis in case of a flexion contracture ≥25° were found. Contracture reduction occurred in some cases and was possibly related to prosthesis use. Fitting a transtibial or transfemoral prosthesis in persons with a lower limb amputation with a severe flexion contracture is possible.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONThis study provides information on prosthesis prescriptions and adaptations for persons with a transfemoral and transtibial amputation with a flexion contracture ≥25°.The fitting of bent prostheses is not limited by prosthetic components and techniques.Parallel to the use of bent prostheses, it is also important to treat the contracture

    More than half of persons with lower limb amputation suffer from chronic back pain or residual limb pain:a systematic review with meta-analysis

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    Purpose: The aim of this study is to systematically review and critically assess the methodological quality of literature regarding prevalence, characteristics and factors influencing pain, other than phantom limb pain (PLP) in persons with lower limb amputation (LLA). Materials and methods: A systematic review was performed (PROSPERO CRD42019138018). Literature was searched using PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PEDro. Studies were included if describing pain other than PLP at least three months after amputation. For residual limb pain (RLP) and back pain, a meta-regression was performed. Results: Fifty-one studies were included in which predominantly young males with a unilateral traumatic amputation using a prosthesis were investigated. Pooled prevalence of RLP was 0.51 (95% CI 0.40-0.62) with a positive association with presence of back pain (p = 0.044) in the univariate meta-regression. Pooled prevalence of back pain was 0.55 (95% CI 0.45-0.64), with a positive association of time since amputation (p <0.001) and co-occurrence of RLP (p = 0.050). Conclusions: Back pain and RLP are common after LLA. The prevalence of back pain was positively associated with the presence of RLP, and vice versa. Future studies should give more attention to other chronic pain types, to persons with a diabetic or vascular cause of amputation, and to pain-related interference
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