36 research outputs found

    Ecumenism: At What Cost?

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    Creation and the Adventist Church (The Associate Editor\u27s Desk)

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    The Latter Days and the Time of the End in the Book of Daniel

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    This study attempts to investigate the two temporal expressions be\u27aharit hayyamim (the latter days) and cet qes (the time of the end) in the book of Daniel. Its main objective is to determine the precise meanings ofthese phrases and the relationship between them. Chapter 1 presents an historical review of literature on the expression the latter days and the time of the end. The four major schools of interpretation (Historical-critical, Preterist, Historicist, Futurist-dispensational) and their understanding of these phrases are outlined and the great divergence of opinions among scholars concerning them is noted. Furthermore, the issues and problems which this study addresses are pointed out. The investigation of the phrase the latter days in chapter 2 shows that only in the Akkadian literature do we find any parallel phrases to be\u27aharit hayyamim. However, the Akkadian phrases ana ahrat ume and ina arkat ume never appear in a religious context and lack an eschatological meaning. In the OT be\u27aharit hayyamim can refer to various periods in thehistory of Israel some of which are eschatological, e.g., Deut 4:30; Jer 23:20; 30:24, and others which are not, e.g., Deut 31:29; Jer 48:47; 49:39. In the book of Daniel the expressions be\u27aharit hayyamim (10:14) and be\u27aharit yomayya\u27 (2:28) are equivalent. Both phrases refer to the future which began in the time of Daniel and which reaches down to the time of the Messianic kingdom. The investigation in chapter 3 indicates that the words cet and qes by themselves can have an eschatological meaning, e.g., cet in Jer 3:17; 8:1-8; 18:23; 33:15 and qes in Amos 8:2; Lam 4:18; and Ezek 7:2,3,6. The phrase cet qes or a cognate equivalent does not appear anywhere in the ancient Semitic literature outside of the book of Daniel. It is an apocalyptic terminus technicus found five times in the latter half of the book of Daniel (8:17; 11:35,40; 12:4,9) and always refers to the apocalyptic end of world history, the final period of time leading up to the absolute End. The final chapter presents an overall summary and presents certain conclusions concerning the two phrases the latter days and the time of the end and their interrelationship

    Interpretations of the Kingdom of God in Daniel 2:44

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    Decoding the Da Vinci Code (The Associate Editor\u27s Desk)

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    Ellen G. White and Earth Science

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    Adventists and Daniel 12 (The Associate Editor\u27s Desk)

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    Daniel\u27s Time of the End

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    Desmond Ford and the Righteousness by Faith Controversy

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    Desmond Ford’s emphasis on Righteousness by Faith, as taught by Paul in the book of Romans, was a necessary course correction to the prevailing perfectionism in the 1960s, particularly in Australia, but not only there. Associated with it was an almost total lack of assurance of salvation among church members. Ford, like E. J. Waggoner in 1888, attempted to show that acceptance by God is on the basis of what Jesus has done, not on the basis of how good we are. Paul says, “He hath made Christ to be sin for us, that we might be made the righteousness of God in Him” (2 Corinthians 5:21). What is the righteousness of God? Perfection–perfect works. Therefore, only perfect obedience is acceptable to God. No human being could render this to God, except Christ. He lived a perfect, sinless life in word, thought, and deed, and then He took our place on the cross and died that we may live. And this perfect obedience–his righteousness, the only righteousness God can accept, is given to us–if we believe. It is imputed to us, i.e., it is put to our account. This, said Ford, is righteousness by faith or justification

    In Defense of the Year-day Principle

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