63 research outputs found

    The Thai endemic, Miriam’s Legless Skink, Davewakeum miriamae Heyer, 1972

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    The global distribution of tetrapods reveals a need for targeted reptile conservation

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    The distributions of amphibians, birds and mammals have underpinned global and local conservation priorities, and have been fundamental to our understanding of the determinants of global biodiversity. In contrast, the global distributions of reptiles, representing a third of terrestrial vertebrate diversity, have been unavailable. This prevented the incorporation of reptiles into conservation planning and biased our understanding of the underlying processes governing global vertebrate biodiversity. Here, we present and analyse the global distribution of 10,064 reptile species (99% of extant terrestrial species). We show that richness patterns of the other three tetrapod classes are good spatial surrogates for species richness of all reptiles combined and of snakes, but characterize diversity patterns of lizards and turtles poorly. Hotspots of total and endemic lizard richness overlap very little with those of other taxa. Moreover, existing protected areas, sites of biodiversity significance and global conservation schemes represent birds and mammals better than reptiles. We show that additional conservation actions are needed to effectively protect reptiles, particularly lizards and turtles. Adding reptile knowledge to a global complementarity conservation priority scheme identifies many locations that consequently become important. Notably, investing resources in some of the world’s arid, grassland and savannah habitats might be necessary to represent all terrestrial vertebrates efficiently

    AVONET: morphological, ecological and geographical data for all birds

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    Functional traits offer a rich quantitative framework for developing and testing theories in evolutionary biology, ecology and ecosystem science. However, the potential of functional traits to drive theoretical advances and refine models of global change can only be fully realised when species‐level information is complete. Here we present the AVONET dataset containing comprehensive functional trait data for all birds, including six ecological variables, 11 continuous morphological traits, and information on range size and location. Raw morphological measurements are presented from 90,020 individuals of 11,009 extant bird species sampled from 181 countries. These data are also summarised as species averages in three taxonomic formats, allowing integration with a global phylogeny, geographical range maps, IUCN Red List data and the eBird citizen science database. The AVONET dataset provides the most detailed picture of continuous trait variation for any major radiation of organisms, offering a global template for testing hypotheses and exploring the evolutionary origins, structure and functioning of biodiversity

    FIGURE 6 in Taxonomic identity of two enigmatic aquatic snake populations (Squamata: Homalopsidae: Cerberus and Homalopsis) from southern Thailand

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    FIGURE 6. Live subadult male from Phuket Province, detail of head. Photograph by M. Sumontha

    Two new species of Cyrtodactylus (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Thailand

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    Bauer, Aaron M., Sumontha, Montri, Pauwels, Olivier S. G. (2003): Two new species of Cyrtodactylus (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Thailand. Zootaxa 376: 1-18, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.15711

    FIGURE 7 in Oligodon saiyok, a new limestone-dwelling kukri snake (Serpentes: Colubridae) from Kanchanaburi Province, western Thailand

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    FIGURE 7. Left view of the head of the preserved paratype of Oligodon saiyok sp. nov. Photograph by M. Sumontha

    FIGURE 5 in Cyrtodactylus khelangensis, a new cave-dwelling Bent-toed Gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Lampang Province, northern Thailand

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    FIGURE 5. Third live adult Cyrtodactylus khelangensis sp. nov. from type locality, not preserved. Photo. by M. Sumontha

    FIGURE 7 in A new lowland forest Bent-toed Gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae: Cyrtodactylus) from Ranong Province, peninsular Thailand

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    FIGURE 7. Map of Thailand showing the position of the type locality of Cyrtodactylus ranongensis sp. nov
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