40,117 research outputs found

    Bystander experiences of domestic violence and abuse during the COVID-19 pandemic

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    This article seeks to understand the experiences of bystanders to domestic violence and abuse (DVA) during the COVID-19 pandemic in Wales. Globally, professionals voiced concern over the COVID-19 restrictions exacerbating conditions for DVA to occur. Yet evidence suggests this also increased opportunities for bystanders to become aware of DVA and take action against it. This mixed methods study consists of a quantitative online survey and follow-up interviews with survey respondents. Conducted in Wales, UK, during a national lockdown in 2021, this article reports on the experiences of 186 bystanders to DVA during the pandemic.Results suggest that bystanders had increased opportunity to become aware of DVA due to the pandemic restrictions. Results support the bystander situational model whereby respondents have to become aware of the behaviour, recognise it as a problem, feel that they possess the correct skills, and have confidence in their skills, before they will take action. Having received bystander training was a significant predictor variable in bystanders taking action against DVA; this is an important finding that should be utilised to upskill general members of the community

    Conceptualising brainwashing: Corporate communication in a concussion crisis

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    Rugby union is one of several sports that is increasingly associated with both short-term and long-term health risks related to traumatic brain injuries sustained while playing the sport. Also in recent years, various sport governing bodies have been shown to have promoted misleading claims about injury. These issues have contributed to what is commonly referred to as a ‘concussion crisis’. In 2021, World Rugby, the global governing body of the Rugby Union, released and promoted a video called “Staying on top of your game: Rugby and brain health”. This video provides an insight into how World Rugby frames the issue of brain injury in the sport of Rugby Union in relation to brain health of players and former players. In this paper we present an analysis of the video, guided by the principles of discourse analysis and Benoit’s (1997) theory of image restoration discourse. Our analysis critiques how rugby union is presented as positive and beneficial for brain health, with its potential to contribute towards neurodegeneration downplayed. Frames of family, inevitability of brain injury, responsibility and balance are used by World Rugby to shape thinking about brain health. Concurrently, the strategies of bolstering and evasion of organisational responsibility are employed to manage the crisis. We build on discourses of washing by proposing the term brainwashing, to describe the tactic of image repair employed by (sport) organisations to focus attention on positive discussions around brain health and away from negative discourses.</p

    Conceptualising Brainwashing: Corporate communication in a concussion crisis

    No full text
    Rugby union is one of several sports that is increasingly associated with both short-term and long-term health risks related to traumatic brain injuries sustained while playing the sport. Also in recent years, various sport governing bodies have been shown to have promoted misleading claims about injury. These issues have contributed to what is commonly referred to as a ‘concussion crisis’. In 2021, World Rugby, the global governing body of the Rugby Union, released and promoted a video called “Staying on top of your game: Rugby and brain health”. This video provides an insight into how World Rugby frames the issue of brain injury in the sport of Rugby Union in relation to brain health of players and former players. In this paper we present an analysis of the video, guided by the principles of discourse analysis and Benoit’s (1997) theory of image restoration discourse. Our analysis critiques how rugby union is presented as positive and beneficial for brain health, with its potential to contribute towards neurodegeneration downplayed. Frames of family, inevitability of brain injury, responsibility and balance are used by World Rugby to shape thinking about brain health. Concurrently, the strategies of bolstering and evasion of organisational responsibility are employed to manage the crisis. We build on discourses of washing by proposing the term brainwashing, to describe the tactic of image repair employed by (sport) organisations to focus attention on positive discussions around brain health and away from negative discourses

    Parry, Lucy J.

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    Maintaining independence in individuals with dementia at home after a fall:a protocol for the UK pilot cluster randomised controlled trial MAINTAIN

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    Introduction: Individuals with dementia face an increased risk of falls. Falls can cause a decline in the individual’s overall functionality. All types of falls, including those that do not result in injury, can lead to psychosocial consequences, such as diminished confidence and a fear of falling. Projections indicate a rising trend in dementia diagnoses, implying an increase in fall incidents. Yet, there is a lack of evidence to support interventions for people living with dementia who have fallen. Our objective is to test the feasibility of a falls intervention trial for people with dementia. Method and analysis: This is a UK-based two-arm pilot cluster randomised controlled trial. In this study, six collaborating sites, which form the clusters, will be randomly allocated to either the intervention arm or the control arm (receiving treatment as usual) at a 1:1 ratio. During the 6 month recruitment phase, each cluster will enrol 10 dyads, comprising 10 individuals with dementia and their respective carers, leading to a total sample size of 60 dyads. The primary outcomes are the feasibility parameters for a full trial (ie, percentage consented, follow-up rate and cost framework). Secondary outcomes include activities of daily living, quality of life, fall efficacy, mobility, goal attainment, cognitive status, occurrence of falls, carer burden and healthcare service utilisation. Outcome measures will be collected at baseline and 28 weeks, with an additional assessment scheduled at 12 weeks for the healthcare service utilisation questionnaire. An embedded process evaluation, consisting of interviews and observations with participants and healthcare professionals, will explore how the intervention operates and the fidelity of study processes. Ethics and dissemination: The study was approved by the NHS and local authority research governance and research ethics committees (NHS REC reference: 23/WA/0126). The results will be shared at meetings and conferences and will be published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number: ISRCTN16413728

    Diabetes mellitus and obesity among South Asians with ischemic stroke across three countries

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    Background: Diabetes mellitus and central obesity are more common among South Asian populations than among White British people. This study explores the differences in diabetes and obesity in South Asians with stroke living in the United Kingdom, India, and Qatar compared with White British stroke patients. Methods: The study included the UK, Indian, and Qatari arms of the ongoing large Bio-Repository of DNA in Stroke (BRAINS) international prospective hospital-based study for South Asian stroke. BRAINS includes 4580 South Asian and White British recruits from UK, Indian, and Qatar sites with first-ever ischemic stroke. Results: The study population comprises 1751 White British (WB) UK residents, 1165 British South Asians (BSA), 1096 South Asians in India (ISA), and 568 South Asians in Qatar (QSA). ISA, BSA, and QSA South Asians suffered from higher prevalence of diabetes compared with WB by 14.5% (ISA: 95% confidence interval (CI) = 18.6–33.0, p < 0.001), 31.7% (BSA: 95% CI = 35.1–50.2, p < 0.001), and 32.7% (QSA: 95% CI = 28.1–37.3, p < 0.001), respectively. Although WB had the highest prevalence of body mass index (BMI) above 27 kg/m2 compared with South Asian patients (37% vs 21%, p < 0.001), South Asian patients had a higher waist circumference than WB (94.8 cm vs 90.8 cm, p < 0.001). Adjusting for traditional stroke risk factors, ISA, BSA, and QSA continued to display an increased risk of diabetes compared with WB by 3.28 (95% CI: 2.53–4.25, p < 0.001), 3.61 (95% CI: 2.90–4.51, p < 0.001), and 5.24 (95% CI: 3.93–7.00, p < 0.001), respectively. Conclusion: South Asian ischemic stroke patients living in Britain and Qatar have a near 3.5-fold risk of diabetes compared with White British stroke patients. Their body composition may partly help explain that increased risk. These findings have important implications for public health policymakers in nations with large South Asian populations

    sj-docx-1-dhj-10.1177_20552076231224072 - Supplemental material for Providing compassionate care in a virtual context: Qualitative exploration of Canadian primary care nurses’ experiences

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    Supplemental material, sj-docx-1-dhj-10.1177_20552076231224072 for Providing compassionate care in a virtual context: Qualitative exploration of Canadian primary care nurses’ experiences by Geneviève Rouleau, Kelly Wu, Monica Parry, Lauralie Richard and Laura Desveaux in DIGITAL HEALTH</p
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