29 research outputs found

    Lean Construction Principles and Railway Maintenance Planning

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    Lean construction principles have been successfully adopted in a variety of industries to increase project management quality. This paper addresses maintenance planning in Sweden and analyses its effectiveness in the framework of lean construction principles. To investigate the status and improvement potential of maintenance contractors’ performance, the study focuses on the detailed planning process, which is mainly the responsibility of contractors. A literature review, a data analysis and interviews were used to reveal the possible barriers to the adaptation of lean principles to the maintenance industry. The study presents a developed theoretical framework for the analysing maintenance processes in the perspective of lean construction principles. We found that the application of lean principles has the potential for improvements in the planning process, but there are some barriers to effective implementation, including a lack of knowledge about lean principles at contractors’ sites

    Towards mobile and intelligent railway transport : A review of recent ERTMS related research

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    The development of the European Railway Traffic Management System (ERTMS) throughout Europe over the last two decades to remove obstacles to providing an interoperable railway network has been facing several challenges. This study briefly highlights several of these challenges by analysing the current architecture of ERTMS and main concerns such as its implementation, the interoperability of communication, formal methods, hybrid ERMS (Level 3), safety, and human factors. This study has taken a systematic approach to data collection and analysis through a review of the current literature. The studies examined illustrate that it is necessary to reduce the number of components in order to pivot the system toward mobile equipment, autonomous trains, and decentralised communication. In the area of formalisation, every supplier and responsible party conducting modelling and testing of the system uses a different tool. Here, we conclude it would be appropriate to develop a robust and reliable tool for modelling, formalisation, testing and the validation of critical safety systems in the railway industry according to its particular specifications and functionalities, e.g. for ERTMS L3, including moving block, virtual coupling and Automatic Train Operation (ATO). To bridge gaps between human operation and new technologies, reduce human error, and increase performance in the railway industry, a stronger emphasis on the development of employees’ skills with new technologies is highly recommended. In order to build upon previous investments in ERTMS and to guarantee backwards and forwards interoperability, it is necessary to exploit hybrid solutions and to gradually update the current systems.QC 20211216</p

    Towards mobile and intelligent railway transport : A review of recent ERTMS related research

    No full text
    The development of the European Railway Traffic Management System (ERTMS) throughout Europe over the last two decades to remove obstacles to providing an interoperable railway network has been facing several challenges. This study briefly highlights several of these challenges by analysing the current architecture of ERTMS and main concerns such as its implementation, the interoperability of communication, formal methods, hybrid ERMS (Level 3), safety, and human factors. This study has taken a systematic approach to data collection and analysis through a review of the current literature. The studies examined illustrate that it is necessary to reduce the number of components in order to pivot the system toward mobile equipment, autonomous trains, and decentralised communication. In the area of formalisation, every supplier and responsible party conducting modelling and testing of the system uses a different tool. Here, we conclude it would be appropriate to develop a robust and reliable tool for modelling, formalisation, testing and the validation of critical safety systems in the railway industry according to its particular specifications and functionalities, e.g. for ERTMS L3, including moving block, virtual coupling and Automatic Train Operation (ATO). To bridge gaps between human operation and new technologies, reduce human error, and increase performance in the railway industry, a stronger emphasis on the development of employees’ skills with new technologies is highly recommended. In order to build upon previous investments in ERTMS and to guarantee backwards and forwards interoperability, it is necessary to exploit hybrid solutions and to gradually update the current systems.QC 20211216</p

    Influencing factors on train punctuality--results from some Norwegian studies

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    This paper discusses the concept of train punctuality, influencing factors and some strategies for improving punctuality. The purpose of the paper is to give an overview of important elements to consider in the preparation of train punctuality improvements, supported by empirical results from studies in Norway. A high capacity utilisation is widely assumed to reduce punctuality. However, the studies from the Oslo area show that capacity utilisation alone cannot explain all variations in punctuality during the day. We particularly point to the number of passengers in the trains as an additional explanation factor. Our own and previous research seems to imply that the key success factor for punctuality on local and regional trains in congested areas is the management of boarding and alighting passengers. On single track lines, such as long distance lines and regional lines in not congested areas, the key success factor seems to lie in the management of train crossings. The paper also discusses precision versus slack strategies as means of improving punctuality. Future research on influencing factors for train punctuality aimed at developing a model for punctuality prediction is proposed.

    Use of big data in project evaluations

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    Impact of signalling system on capacity – Comparing legacy ATC, ETCS Level 2 and ETCS Hybrid Level 3 systems

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    Most railways use fixed block technology, which could be replaced with moving block technology with associated high cost. It is therefore interesting to gradually upgrade the signalling system exploiting hybrid technologies. This paper aims to investigate the impact on capacity of various signalling systems (including fixed block technology and hybrid technology) using a microscopic simulation tool under scheduled (static) conditions without considering probability functions. To perform comparative analysis between European Train Control System (ETCS) Hybrid Level 3, ETCS Level 2, and the Swedish ATC2 legacy system, three signalling system scenarios are designed and capacity consumption is considered as a performance indicator. The study was performed on the central section of Stockholm’s commuter train network with peak hour conditions from the 2020 timetable. The results show that ETCS L2 delivers lower capacity consumption in total compared to the ATC2 legacy system. ETCS Hybrid Level 3 with existing trackside train detection and partially shortened block sections delivers lower capacity consumption compared to ETCS L2 and ATC2. The implementation of hybrid solutions such as ETCS Hybrid Level 3 in addition to allowing for gradual upgrading of signalling systems to the next generation (moving block system) can improve capacity of high-density commuter lines.QC 20220627</p

    Challenges of replacing train drivers in driverless and unattended railway mainline systems—A Swedish case study on delay logs descriptions

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    Currently, the challenges of driverless or unattended train operation have not been described in detail and are often grouped into one category. This paper contributes to filling a knowledge gap regarding the roles of the train driver about the potential use of automatic train operation (ATO) on high grade of automation (GoA) levels. The results contribute to a better understanding of the challenges with driverless or unattended train operation to support strategies on how to utilize ATO on a wider range of trains than is presently the case. We use the Swedish railway network as a case study and delay logs written by train dispatchers for 2019. Our research quantifies how often unplanned events occur in which the train driver is needed, and the role of the train driver in solving these problems. In addition to this we elaborate on existing GoA levels definitions and propose a revised model that highlights more aspects of the train drivers’ roles. We have identified six categories in which an action by the driver is required: Detect, Report, Inspect, Adjust, Manage passengers, and Respond to train orders. The study illustrates some of the challenges with driverless or unattended train operation, and points to the need to develop strategies not only for the driving aspects of ATO but also for the more general technical operational management of rolling stock in high GoA levels
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