72 research outputs found

    The accuracy of baseline centiles to estimate refractive status at the age of 15 years in first-born twins <sup>*</sup>.

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    <p>The accuracy of baseline centiles to estimate refractive status at the age of 15 years in first-born twins <sup><a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0167642#t002fn001" target="_blank">*</a></sup>.</p

    The accuracy of baseline centiles to identify first-born twins with high myopia (SE ≤-6.0D) at the age of 15 years by sex.

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    <p>The accuracy of baseline centiles to identify first-born twins with high myopia (SE ≤-6.0D) at the age of 15 years by sex.</p

    Percentile curves for urban Chinese girls based on cross-sectional data.

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    <p>Percentile curves for urban Chinese girls based on cross-sectional data.</p

    Percentile curves for urban Chinese boys based on cross-sectional data.

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    <p>Percentile curves for urban Chinese boys based on cross-sectional data.</p

    Six-year changes in refraction and related ocular biometric factors in an adult Chinese population

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    <div><p>Purpose</p><p>To investigate longitudinal changes in refraction and biometry in Chinese adults.</p><p>Design</p><p>Population-based prospective cohort study.</p><p>Methods</p><p>1817 subjects aged ≥ 35 years were randomly recruited from Yuexiu district, Guangzhou, China in 2008. Of which 1595 (87.8%) were reexamined in 2010 and 1427 (78.5%) were reexamined in 2014. Non-cycloplegic automated refraction and visual acuity test were performed at baseline and the 6-year follow-up examination for all participants. In addition, 50% of the participants were randomly selected for axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD) and lens thickness (LT) measurements using non-contact partial coherence laser interferometry. Lens power (LP) was calculated with the Bennett’s equation.</p><p>Results</p><p>A total of 1300 participants were included in current analysis (2008 mean [SD] age, 51.4 [10.6] years; 54.5% women). Mean change in spherical equivalence (SE) was +0.24 (95% confidence interval [CI], +0.19 to +0.30), +0.51 (95% CI, +0.46 to +0.57), +0.26 (95% CI, +0.15 to +0.38) and -0.05 (95% CI, -0.21 to +0.10) diopters (D) for individuals in the age groups of 35 to 44, 45 to 54, 55 to 64 and 65+ years at baseline, respectively. Corneal power, AL and LT increased while ACD and LP decreased during the follow-up. Baseline SE and changes in biometric factors could explain 97.2% of the variance in longitudinal SE change while LP solely could explain 65.2%. Six-year mean change in cylinder power was -0.16 (95% CI, -0.19 to -0.13) D, the axis of astigmatism changed from “with-the-rule” to “against-the-rule” in 16.4% of the participants and to “oblique” in 0.9%.</p><p>Conclusions</p><p>This study confirms a hyperopic shift in the elderly before 65 years old and a myopic shift thereafter. Longitudinal refraction change could be well explained by corresponding biometry changes, especially LP. There is also a shift to “against-the-rule” astigmatism for the adult population.</p></div

    P-values from association tests of jointly analyzing CYL and SPH.

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    <p>The bold-face texts highlight where ATeMP tests may be superior to MultiPhen.</p

    Distribution of astigmatism types at each examination in different age groups.

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    <p>Distribution of astigmatism types at each examination in different age groups.</p

    Six-year changes of spherical equivalence and related biometric factors in the right eye.

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    <p>Six-year changes of spherical equivalence and related biometric factors in the right eye.</p
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