186 research outputs found

    Capturing case complexity:is clinician selected dose of vocational rehabilitation related to questionnaire results?

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    BACKGROUND: To establish an optimum dosage interdisciplinary vocational rehabilitation, it is important to be able to reliably and validly assess case complexity. Assessment of case complexity is currently clinician based because no validated means to assess case complexity is presently available. Indices assumed to associate with case complexity can contribute to the choice of dosage. The objective of this study was to explore the extent in which results of questionnaires were associated with the choice of treatment dosage in vocational rehabilitation. METHODS: Design: cross-sectional study of observational data. The study population consisted of workers on part-time or full-time sick leave due to chronic multifactorial problems. Thousand eighty-nine patients who were referred to a privately owned organization with outpatient vocational rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands between July 2016 and March 2017 were allocated to one of the three programs based on case complexity as determined by clinicians based on clinical interview and questionnaires. RESULTS: Questionnaires accounted for 13% of the variance in the total group, 13% in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (n = 662) and 29% in patients with chronic fatigue (n = 235). CONCLUSION: The results of the questionnaires contribute little in the assessment of case complexity and dose recommendation. Implications for Rehabilitation Assessment of case complexity of patients with chronic multifactorial complaints and disability is complex. The results of this study suggest that case complexity and choice of treatment dose is slightly explained by questionnaire results. It is largely determined on heuristics developed by knowledge and experience of clinicians. No reliable and validated means to assess case complexity is presently available in the field of rehabilitation and optimum treatment dose cannot be determined transparently. Routinely collected clinical data of baseline characteristics, process measures and results are a valuable source that can be used to answer research questions

    Knowledge and attitudes toward musculoskeletal pain neuroscience of manual therapy postgraduate students in the Netherlands

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    BACKGROUND: Health care practitioners' knowledge and attitudes influence patients' beliefs and health outcomes in musculoskeletal (MSK) pain. It is unclear to what extent physiotherapists undertaking a postgraduate master in manual therapy (MT students) possess the knowledge and attitudes toward pain neuroscience to be able to apply the biopsychosocial model in patients with MSK pain. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes toward pain neuroscience in MT students. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. METHOD: Self-reported knowledge and attitudes were measured among students (n = 662) at baseline and in all years of the MT postgraduate programs in the Netherlands. The Knowledge and Attitudes of Pain questionnaire (KNAP) was used as a primary measure. Difference in KNAP-scores between baseline (0), year 1, year 2 and year 3 was tested using a one-way ANOVA (hypothesis: 0 < 1<2 < 3). A two factor ANOVA was used to determine the interaction effect of focused pain education and year in the curriculum with KNAP. RESULTS: There was an overall significant difference of KNAP scores with a medium effect size (F(3, 218.18) = 13.56, p < .001, ω2 = 0.059). Differences between years ranged from small to medium. Interaction effect of knowledge and attitudes and focused pain education was significant with a small effect size (F(6) = 2.597, p = .017, ω2 = 0.012). Sensitivity analyses were consistent with the main results. CONCLUSIONS: Positive differences in knowledge and attitudes toward pain neuroscience in MT students occur between the progressing years of the curriculum. Differences may be related to the provision of focused pain education

    Pain Rehabilitation During Adolescence; Work in Adulthood? A Long-Term Follow-Up Study to Explore the Facilitators and Barriers for Work:A long-term follow-up study to explore the facilitators and barriers for work

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    Background Adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain face different impairments in daily life. After an inpatient pain rehabilitation program, adolescents function better on several domains. The aim of this study was to explore the long-term work participation of adults who followed inpatient pain rehabilitation during adolescence because of chronic musculoskeletal pain and to identify potential facilitators and barriers regarding work in later life. Methods A mixed-methods study with standardized questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The questionnaires measured pain, disability, work status, and the quality and quantity of the work. The interviews contained questions about work participation. Potential participants were all patients who had participated in an inpatient pain rehabilitation program 15 to 20 years previously. Analyses were performed by thematic analysis. Using the Sherbrooke model as guidance, themes were classified into 4 systems: healthcare, workplace, legislative/insurance, and personal. Results Fourteen patients consented to participate (12 females). Seventy-one percent of them had paid work. The mean self-reported quality of the work delivered was 9.6 (standard deviation = 0.5). Eighteen facilitators and 12 barriers regarding work participation later on in life were mentioned. The inpatient pain rehabilitation program was the most frequently mentioned facilitator (n = 5), while the personal system and coping-related factors were the most frequently mentioned barriers (n = 5). Conclusions Ten out of 14 participants are currently working, most of them despite experiencing pain. Several factors based on the 4 systems of the Sherbrooke model contribute as facilitators or barriers regarding current work participation. Pain rehabilitation is mostly regarded as a facilitator for work participation later on in life

    Assessing future health care practitioners’ knowledge and attitudes of musculoskeletal pain; development and measurement properties of a new questionnaire

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    BACKGROUND: Healthcare practitioner beliefs influence patients' beliefs and health outcomes in musculoskeletal (MSK) pain. A validated questionnaire based on modern pain neuroscience assessing Knowledge and Attitudes of Pain (KNAP) was unavailable. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to develop and test measurement properties of KNAP. DESIGN: Phase 1; Development of KNAP reflecting modern pain neuroscience and expert opinion. Phase 2; a cross-sectional and longitudinal study among Dutch physiotherapy students. METHOD: In the cross-sectional study (n = 424), internal consistency, structural validity, hypotheses testing, and Rasch analysis were examined. Longitudinal designs were applied to analyse test-retest reliability (n = 156), responsiveness, and interpretability (n = 76). RESULTS: A 30-item KNAP was developed in 4 stages. Test-retest reliability: ICC (2,1) 0.80. Internal consistency: Cronbach's α 0.80. Smallest Detectable Difference 90%: 4.99 (4.31; 5.75). Structural validity: exploratory factor analysis showed 2 factors. Hypotheses testing: associations with the Pain Attitudes and Beliefs Scale for Physiotherapists biopsychosocial subscale r = 0.60, with biomedical subscale r = -0.58, with the Neurophysiology of Pain Questionnaire r = 0.52. Responsiveness: 93% improved on KNAP after studying pain education. Minimal Important Change: 4.84 (95%CI: 2.77; 6.91). CONCLUSIONS: The KNAP has adequate measurement properties. This new questionnaire could be useful to evaluate physiotherapy students' knowledge and attitudes of modern pain neuroscience that could help to create awareness and evaluate physiotherapy education programs, and ultimately provide better pain management

    Process Evaluation of a Workers' Health Surveillance Program for Meat Processing Workers

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    Objective To evaluate the implementation process of a workers' health surveillance (WHS) program in a Dutch meat processing company. Methods Workers from five plants were eligible to participate in the WHS program. The program consisted of four evaluative components and an intervention component. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to evaluate seven process aspects. Data were gathered by interviews with stakeholders, participant questionnaires, and from registries of the company and occupational health service. Results Two recruitment strategies were used: open invitation or automatic participation. Of the 986 eligible workers, 305 participated in the program. Average reach was 53 %. Two out of five program components could not be assessed on dose delivered, dose received and fidelity. If components were assessable, 85-100 % of the components was delivered, 66-100 % of the components was received by participants, and fidelity was 100 %. Participants were satisfied with the WHS program (mean score 7.6). Contextual factors that facilitated implementation were among others societal developments and management support. Factors that formed barriers were program novelty and delayed follow-up. Conclusion The WHS program was well received by participants. Not all participants were offered the same number of program components, and not all components were performed according to protocol. Deviation from protocol is an indication of program failure and may affect program effectiveness.</p

    Measurement Properties of the Full and Brief Version of the Work Rehabilitation Questionnaire in Persons with Physical Disabilities

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    Purpose The Work Rehabilitation Questionnaire (WORQ) is a self-report vocational rehabilitation assessment. A comprehensive (WORQ-FULL) and a brief version (WORQ-BRIEF) are available. The purpose of this study was to investigate measurement properties of both versions in persons with physical disabilities. Methods Cross sectional and test-retest design. Adults with physical disabilities in vocational rehabilitation were included. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha), test-retest reliability (intra-class correlation; ICC), agreement between sessions (Bland-Altman Plots), criterion validity (ICC and agreement with Bland-Altman Plots between WORQ-FULL and WORQ-BRIEF) and convergent validity with the Work Ability Index -Single item (WAS) and the EuroQOL 5D-5L were analyzed. Results Out of the 91 individuals who agreed to participate, 74 (81%) returned questionnaire T1 and 49 (54%) participants returned questionnaire T2 within the maximum time interval (= 27 days). At T2, 28 (57%) participants reported no medical changes compared to T1. Median age was 49 (IQR 40-60), 57% were male, 47% had experienced a stroke and 27% a spinal cord injury (n = 49). Internal consistency was good: 0.95/0.95/0.94 for the WORQ-FULL and 0.88/0.89/0.85 for the WORQ-BRIEF (n = 74/n = 48/n = 28, respectively). Test-retest reliabilitywas good: ICC = 0.86/0.85 for the WORQ-FULL and ICC = 0.87/0.86 for the WORQ-BRIEF (n = 49/ n = 28). Bland Altman plots suggested a higher score at T1. As for criterion validity of the WORQ-FULL versus the WORQ-BRIEF, ICC was good (ICC = 0.84; n = 74), however Bland Altman plots indicated potential bias. Correlations with the WAS/EuroQOL 5D-5L were variable: r = -0.24/r = -0.57 (WORQ-FULL) and r = -0.28/-0.65 (WORQ-BRIEF). Conclusions The WORQ showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Agreement demonstrated large score differences are needed to indicate change beyond random chance at individual level, whereas small changes are sufficient at group level. Criterion validity of the WORQ-FULL versus the WORQ-BRIEF was supported, however, agreement demonstrated moderate to large score differences are needed to indicate change beyond random chance at individual level, whereas small changes are sufficient at group level. This indicates the WORQ-FULL and WORQ-BRIEF are better not used interchangeably. Correlation analyses provided better insight in the validity of the WORQ. Convergent validity was supported for the WORQ-BRIEF with the EuroQoL 5D-5L (r = -0.65)

    Effectiveness and Cost-benefit Evaluation of a Comprehensive Workers' Health Surveillance Program for Sustainable Employability of Meat Processing Workers

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    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive workers' health surveillance (WHS) program on aspects of sustainable employability and cost-benefit. Methods A cluster randomized stepped wedge trial was performed in a Dutch meat processing company from february 2012 until march 2015. In total 305 workers participated in the trial. Outcomes were retrieved during a WHS program, by multiple questionnaires, and from company registries. Primary outcomes were sickness absence, work ability, and productivity. Secondary outcomes were health, vitality, and psychosocial workload. Data were analyzed with linear and logistic multilevel models. Cost-benefit analyses from the employer's perspective were performed as well. Results Primary outcomes sickness absence (OR = 1.40), work ability (B = -0.63) and productivity (OR = 0.71) were better in the control condition. Secondary outcomes did not or minimally differ between conditions. Of the 12 secondary outcomes, the only outcome that scored better in the experimental condition was meaning of work (B = 0.18). Controlling for confounders did not or minimally change the results. However, our stepped wedge design did not enable adjustment for confounding in the last two periods of the trial. The WHS program resulted in higher costs for the employer on the short and middle term. Conclusions Primary outcomes did not improve after program implementation and secondary outcomes remained equal after implementation. The program was not cost-beneficial after 1-3 year follow-up. Main limitation that may have contributed to absence of positive effects may be program failure, because interventions were not deployed as intended

    State anxiety improves prediction of pain and pain-related disability after 12 weeks in patients with acute low back pain:a cohort study

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    Question: Do measures of state anxiety and trait anxiety in people with acute low back pain (ALBP) improve prediction of chronic low back pain (CLBP), defined as pain or pain-related disability at 12 weeks? Design: Observational multi-centre prospective cohort study in primary physiotherapy care with measurements at baseline and at 12 weeks of state and trait anxiety, as well as other established prognostic factors for CLBP. Participants: People with nonspecific ALBP, aged 18 to 60 years, who had been pain free for ≥ 3 months before their current ALBP, and who were being treated according the Dutch clinical guidelines. Outcome measures and analysis: CLBP was defined as a pain score ≥ 3/10 on the Numerical Pain Rating Scale (primary outcome), and as a pain-related disability score ≥ 19/70 on the Pain Disability Inventory. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses estimated how the risk of CLBP differed with state and trait anxiety and other established prognostic factors. Results: Most (204 of 225) participants completed both assessments. State anxiety was an independent predictor of CLBP, whether defined as pain or pain-related disability at 12 weeks, in contrast to trait anxiety. State anxiety improved the predictive performance of the model, with area under the curve (AUC) increasing from 0.64 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.71) to 0.75 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.82) and Nagelkerke's R2 increasing from 0.08 to 0.24 for the primary outcome measure, pain. For the secondary outcome measure, pain-related disability: AUC 0.63 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.72) improved to 0.73 (95% CI 0.65 to 0.82) and Nagelkerke's R2 increased from 0.05 to 0.16. Adding trait anxiety to the prognostic model for pain improved the AUC from 0.64 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.71) to 0.70 (95% CI 0.62 to 0.77) and Nagelkerke's R2 from 0.08 to 0.15. Conclusion: State anxiety in patients with ALBP improved prediction of CLBP, defined as pain and pain-related disability at 12 weeks

    Variation in occupational exposure associated with musculoskeletal complaints:a cross-sectional study among professional bassists

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    Variation in occupational exposure is assumed to have a protective effect against the development of musculoskeletal complaints (MSC), but this common assumption is not strongly supported by the literature. Among musicians, who have a high prevalence of MSC, many play more than one type of instrument (multi-instrumentalism) for many hours a day. Since multi-instrumentalism implies greater variation in ergonomic load of specific musculoskeletal areas than mono-instrumentalism, musicians are a suitable study population to test whether the above assumption is true. To investigate in a sample of professional bass players whether multi-instrumentalists are less likely to have MSC than mono-instrumentalists. Participants were 141 professional and professional student double bassists and bass guitarists. Demographic, MSC and exposure characteristics were collected online with self-constructed and existing questionnaires. Logistic regression analysis was used to test the association between multi- versus mono-instrumentalism and MSC, adjusted for confounders. The prevalence of having MSC in the neck, back, right shoulder area and both wrist areas did not differ significantly between the two groups. Further analysis revealed that the likelihood of having MSC in the left shoulder area was higher in multi-instrumentalists compared to mono-instrumentalists (Odds ratio 0.30, 95% CI 0.119-0.753, p = 0.010). In this sample of professional bass players, no protective effect of multi-instrumentalism against MSC was found. Multi-instrumentalism was associated with a higher prevalence of MSC in the left shoulder. This result challenges theoretical and clinical assumptions in occupational and pain medicine
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