16 research outputs found

    Broad Street, East of Main Street, New Castle, Indiana

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    New Castle, known as "The Rose City" in the early 1900s, was the major grower of the American Beauty Rose. Damage from the 1917 tornado, competition, and export decline during WWI combined to destroy the city's rose industry.View of one side of Broad Street in New Castle, Indiana. The large building on the far left is "Burr's Block." Interurban tracks run down the middle of the street and the wires are seen overhead

    Women doing gymnastic exercises on a Swedish window ladder apparatus, Barbour Gymnasium, 1910

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    John Scott & Company, architecture firm. Barbour Gymnasium (for women) was attached to the north side of the Waterman Gymnasium. Built during 1895 and 1896. Demolished in 1977 to make room for the expansion of the Chemistry Building

    Women's gymnastics, 1910 (Two women climbing ladders)

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    On verso: Gymnastics-3 dupl. (1910

    Lionel Hampton with Billy Ward

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    10 x 8 inch photograph. Lionel Hampton with Billy Ward300 dpi compressed jpg is displayed. Epson Expression 1640 XL Scanner, Epson TWAIN Pro, Adobe Photoshop 7.0, Archival Master file is a TIFF

    Students in Old Law Library, Haven Hall (photo by Gibson Studio)

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    Jordan & Anderson, architecture firm. The Law Building was built in 1863 on the corner of State Street and North University Avenue. In 1863 it was occupied by the Law School, the University Chapel (until 1873) and the General Library (until 1883). Renovated and enlarged in 1893 and then again in 1898 by architects Spier and Rohn of Detroit, Michigan who removed the tower and added a new south wing. Renamed Haven Hall in 1933 when the Law School moved to Hutchins Hall in the Law Quadrangle. Haven Hall then became one of the major buildings of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, with space given to the Departments of History, Sociology, Journalism, and the Bureau of Government and its library collection. Extension Division also had offices in Haven Hall. The building was destroyed by fire in 1950

    Foyer of Intramural Sports Building

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    Smith, Hinchman & Grylls Associates, architecture firm. Inspired by Fielding H. Yost's enthusiasm and support of athletics for all, this building opened in October 1928 and was the first university-owned structure in the nation devoted primarily to intramural sports (Encyclopedic Survey, p. 1988)

    Empty interior (gymnasium) of Intramural Sports Building

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    Smith, Hinchman & Grylls Associates, architecture firm. Inspired by Fielding H. Yost's enthusiasm and support of athletics for all, this building opened in October 1928 and was the first university-owned structure in the nation devoted primarily to intramural sports (Encyclopedic Survey, p. 1988)

    Victor C. Vaughan, ca. 1893

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    South side entrance to Intramural Sports Building

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    Smith, Hinchman & Grylls Associates, architecture firm. Inspired by Fielding H. Yost's enthusiasm and support of athletics for all, this building opened in October 1928 and was the first university-owned structure in the nation devoted primarily to intramural sports (Encyclopedic Survey, p. 1988)

    Native American men with British flag and Victrola

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