103 research outputs found

    The Fermi-LAT Light Curve Repository

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    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) light curve repository (LCR) is a publicly available, continually updated library of gamma-ray light curves of variable Fermi-LAT sources generated over multiple timescales. The Fermi-LAT LCR aims to provide publication-quality light curves binned on timescales of 3 days, 7 days, and 30 days for 1525 sources deemed variable in the source catalog of the first 10 years of Fermi-LAT observations. The repository consists of light curves generated through full likelihood analyses that model the sources and the surrounding region, providing fluxes and photon indices for each time bin. The LCR is intended as a resource for the time-domain and multi-messenger communities by allowing users to quickly search LAT data to identify correlated variability and flaring emission episodes from gamma-ray sources. We describe the sample selection and analysis employed by the LCR and provide an overview of the associated data access portal

    Fermi-GBM Discovery of GRB 221009A: An Extraordinarily Bright GRB from Onset to Afterglow

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    International audienceWe report the discovery of GRB 221009A, the highest flux gamma-ray burst ever observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). This GRB has continuous prompt emission lasting more than 600 seconds, afterglow visible in the \gbm energy range (8 keV--40 MeV), and total energetics higher than any other burst in the GBM sample. By using a variety of new and existing analysis techniques we probe the spectral and temporal evolution of GRB 221009A. We find no emission prior to the GBM trigger time (t0; 2022 October 9 at 13:16:59.99 UTC), indicating that this is the time of prompt emission onset. The triggering pulse exhibits distinct spectral and temporal properties suggestive of shock-breakout with significant emission up to ∌\sim15 MeV. We characterize the onset of external shock at \t0+600 s and find evidence of a plateau region in the early-afterglow phase which transitions to a slope consistent with \swift-XRT afterglow measurements. We place the total energetics of GRB 221009A in context with the rest of the GBM sample and find that this GRB has the highest total isotropic-equivalent energy (EÎł,iso=1.0×1055\textrm{E}_{\gamma,\textrm{iso}}=1.0\times10^{55} erg) and second highest isotropic-equivalent luminosity (LÎł,iso=9.9×1053\textrm{L}_{\gamma,\textrm{iso}}=9.9\times10^{53} erg/s) based on redshift of z = 0.151. These extreme energetics are what allowed GBMto observe the continuously emitting central engine from the beginning of the prompt emission phase through the onset of early afterglow

    The Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog of Gamma-ray Pulsars

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    International audienceWe present 294 pulsars found in GeV data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Another 33 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) discovered in deep radio searches of LAT sources will likely reveal pulsations once phase-connected rotation ephemerides are achieved. A further dozen optical and/or X-ray binary systems co-located with LAT sources also likely harbor gamma-ray MSPs. This catalog thus reports roughly 340 gamma-ray pulsars and candidates, 10% of all known pulsars, compared to ≀11\leq 11 known before Fermi. Half of the gamma-ray pulsars are young. Of these, the half that are undetected in radio have a broader Galactic latitude distribution than the young radio-loud pulsars. The others are MSPs, with 6 undetected in radio. Overall, >235 are bright enough above 50 MeV to fit the pulse profile, the energy spectrum, or both. For the common two-peaked profiles, the gamma-ray peak closest to the magnetic pole crossing generally has a softer spectrum. The spectral energy distributions tend to narrow as the spindown power E˙\dot E decreases to its observed minimum near 103310^{33} erg s−1^{-1}, approaching the shape for synchrotron radiation from monoenergetic electrons. We calculate gamma-ray luminosities when distances are available. Our all-sky gamma-ray sensitivity map is useful for population syntheses. The electronic catalog version provides gamma-ray pulsar ephemerides, properties and fit results to guide and be compared with modeling results

    The Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog of Gamma-ray Pulsars

    No full text
    International audienceWe present 294 pulsars found in GeV data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Another 33 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) discovered in deep radio searches of LAT sources will likely reveal pulsations once phase-connected rotation ephemerides are achieved. A further dozen optical and/or X-ray binary systems co-located with LAT sources also likely harbor gamma-ray MSPs. This catalog thus reports roughly 340 gamma-ray pulsars and candidates, 10% of all known pulsars, compared to ≀11\leq 11 known before Fermi. Half of the gamma-ray pulsars are young. Of these, the half that are undetected in radio have a broader Galactic latitude distribution than the young radio-loud pulsars. The others are MSPs, with 6 undetected in radio. Overall, >235 are bright enough above 50 MeV to fit the pulse profile, the energy spectrum, or both. For the common two-peaked profiles, the gamma-ray peak closest to the magnetic pole crossing generally has a softer spectrum. The spectral energy distributions tend to narrow as the spindown power E˙\dot E decreases to its observed minimum near 103310^{33} erg s−1^{-1}, approaching the shape for synchrotron radiation from monoenergetic electrons. We calculate gamma-ray luminosities when distances are available. Our all-sky gamma-ray sensitivity map is useful for population syntheses. The electronic catalog version provides gamma-ray pulsar ephemerides, properties and fit results to guide and be compared with modeling results

    The Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog of Gamma-ray Pulsars

    No full text
    International audienceWe present 294 pulsars found in GeV data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Another 33 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) discovered in deep radio searches of LAT sources will likely reveal pulsations once phase-connected rotation ephemerides are achieved. A further dozen optical and/or X-ray binary systems co-located with LAT sources also likely harbor gamma-ray MSPs. This catalog thus reports roughly 340 gamma-ray pulsars and candidates, 10% of all known pulsars, compared to ≀11\leq 11 known before Fermi. Half of the gamma-ray pulsars are young. Of these, the half that are undetected in radio have a broader Galactic latitude distribution than the young radio-loud pulsars. The others are MSPs, with 6 undetected in radio. Overall, >235 are bright enough above 50 MeV to fit the pulse profile, the energy spectrum, or both. For the common two-peaked profiles, the gamma-ray peak closest to the magnetic pole crossing generally has a softer spectrum. The spectral energy distributions tend to narrow as the spindown power E˙\dot E decreases to its observed minimum near 103310^{33} erg s−1^{-1}, approaching the shape for synchrotron radiation from monoenergetic electrons. We calculate gamma-ray luminosities when distances are available. Our all-sky gamma-ray sensitivity map is useful for population syntheses. The electronic catalog version provides gamma-ray pulsar ephemerides, properties and fit results to guide and be compared with modeling results

    Fermi-GBM Discovery of GRB 221009A: An Extraordinarily Bright GRB from Onset to Afterglow

    No full text
    International audienceWe report the discovery of GRB 221009A, the highest flux gamma-ray burst ever observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). This GRB has continuous prompt emission lasting more than 600 seconds, afterglow visible in the \gbm energy range (8 keV--40 MeV), and total energetics higher than any other burst in the GBM sample. By using a variety of new and existing analysis techniques we probe the spectral and temporal evolution of GRB 221009A. We find no emission prior to the GBM trigger time (t0; 2022 October 9 at 13:16:59.99 UTC), indicating that this is the time of prompt emission onset. The triggering pulse exhibits distinct spectral and temporal properties suggestive of shock-breakout with significant emission up to ∌\sim15 MeV. We characterize the onset of external shock at \t0+600 s and find evidence of a plateau region in the early-afterglow phase which transitions to a slope consistent with \swift-XRT afterglow measurements. We place the total energetics of GRB 221009A in context with the rest of the GBM sample and find that this GRB has the highest total isotropic-equivalent energy (EÎł,iso=1.0×1055\textrm{E}_{\gamma,\textrm{iso}}=1.0\times10^{55} erg) and second highest isotropic-equivalent luminosity (LÎł,iso=9.9×1053\textrm{L}_{\gamma,\textrm{iso}}=9.9\times10^{53} erg/s) based on redshift of z = 0.151. These extreme energetics are what allowed GBMto observe the continuously emitting central engine from the beginning of the prompt emission phase through the onset of early afterglow

    The Fourth Catalog of Active Galactic Nuclei Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope -- Data Release 3

    No full text
    An incremental version of the fourth catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope is presented. This version (4LAC-DR3) derives from the third data release of the 4FGL catalog based on 12 years of E>50 MeV gamma-ray data, where the spectral parameters, spectral energy distributions (SEDs), yearly light curves, and associations have been updated for all sources. The new reported AGNs include 587 blazar candidates and four radio galaxies. We describe the properties of the new sample and outline changes affecting the previously published one. We also introduce two new parameters in this release, namely the peak energy of the SED high-energy component and the corresponding flux. These parameters allow an assessment of the Compton dominance, the ratio of the Inverse-Compton to the synchrotron peak luminosities, without relying on X-ray data

    The Fourth Catalog of Active Galactic Nuclei Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope -- Data Release 3

    No full text
    An incremental version of the fourth catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope is presented. This version (4LAC-DR3) derives from the third data release of the 4FGL catalog based on 12 years of E>50 MeV gamma-ray data, where the spectral parameters, spectral energy distributions (SEDs), yearly light curves, and associations have been updated for all sources. The new reported AGNs include 587 blazar candidates and four radio galaxies. We describe the properties of the new sample and outline changes affecting the previously published one. We also introduce two new parameters in this release, namely the peak energy of the SED high-energy component and the corresponding flux. These parameters allow an assessment of the Compton dominance, the ratio of the Inverse-Compton to the synchrotron peak luminosities, without relying on X-ray data

    The Fourth Catalog of Active Galactic Nuclei Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope -- Data Release 3

    No full text
    International audienceAn incremental version of the fourth catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope is presented. This version (4LAC-DR3) derives from the third data release of the 4FGL catalog based on 12 years of E>50 MeV gamma-ray data, where the spectral parameters, spectral energy distributions (SEDs), yearly light curves, and associations have been updated for all sources. The new reported AGNs include 587 blazar candidates and four radio galaxies. We describe the properties of the new sample and outline changes affecting the previously published one. We also introduce two new parameters in this release, namely the peak energy of the SED high-energy component and the corresponding flux. These parameters allow an assessment of the Compton dominance, the ratio of the Inverse-Compton to the synchrotron peak luminosities, without relying on X-ray data

    The Fourth Catalog of Active Galactic Nuclei Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope -- Data Release 3

    No full text
    An incremental version of the fourth catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope is presented. This version (4LAC-DR3) derives from the third data release of the 4FGL catalog based on 12 years of E>50 MeV gamma-ray data, where the spectral parameters, spectral energy distributions (SEDs), yearly light curves, and associations have been updated for all sources. The new reported AGNs include 587 blazar candidates and four radio galaxies. We describe the properties of the new sample and outline changes affecting the previously published one. We also introduce two new parameters in this release, namely the peak energy of the SED high-energy component and the corresponding flux. These parameters allow an assessment of the Compton dominance, the ratio of the Inverse-Compton to the synchrotron peak luminosities, without relying on X-ray data
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