12,744 research outputs found

    sj-docx-1-yas-10.1177_0044118X241229733 – Supplemental material for Contributions of Violence Exposure and Traumatic Stress Symptoms to Physical Health Outcomes in Incarcerated Adolescents

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    Supplemental material, sj-docx-1-yas-10.1177_0044118X241229733 for Contributions of Violence Exposure and Traumatic Stress Symptoms to Physical Health Outcomes in Incarcerated Adolescents by Suzanne Perkins, Rebecca M. Ametrano, Marisa Leach, John P. Kobrossi, Joanne Smith-Darden and Sandra A. Graham-Bermann in Youth & Society</p

    Shocks, recovery processes and cultivating urban plasticity:a neuroplasticity-informed perspective on urban resilience

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    By drawing together two previously disparate literatures – urban resilience and neuroplasticity – a new integrated urban plasticity approach is outlined. Urban plasticity is a fresh perspective through which to ask questions about the city and also, importantly, the people, places and people-place connections that form a city’s identity and which contribute to urban recovery capabilities. Instead of presenting a ‘correct’ approach to recovery, the chapter suggests that attending to the qualities of a particular context is conducive to developing a richer improvisational ability to guide systems of people and structures through crises and subsequent recoveries

    Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus in Person Living with HIV, Connecticut, USA, 2021

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    Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is an underreported cause of miscarriage and neurologic disease. Surveillance remains challenging because of nonspecific symptomatology, inconsistent case reporting, and difficulties with diagnostic testing. We describe a case of acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus disease in a person living with HIV in Connecticut, USA, identified by using quantitative reverse transcription PCR

    Continuous observations of the surface energy budget and meteorology over the Arctic sea ice during MOSAiC

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    The Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (MOSAiC) was a yearlong expedition supported by the icebreaker R/V Polarstern, following the Transpolar Drift from October 2019 to October 2020. The campaign documented an annual cycle of physical, biological, and chemical processes impacting the atmosphere-ice-ocean system. Of central importance were measurements of the thermodynamic and dynamic evolution of the sea ice. A multi-agency international team led by the University of Colorado/CIRES and NOAA-PSL observed meteorology and surface-atmosphere energy exchanges, including radiation; turbulent momentum flux; turbulent latent and sensible heat flux; and snow conductive flux. There were four stations on the ice, a 10 m micrometeorological tower paired with a 23/30 m mast and radiation station and three autonomous Atmospheric Surface Flux Stations. Collectively, the four stations acquired ~928 days of data. This manuscript documents the acquisition and post-processing of those measurements and provides a guide for researchers to access and use the data products

    Prospective evaluation of echocardiographic parameters and cardiac biomarkers in healthy dogs eating four custom-formulated diets

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    IntroductionDiet-associated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) has been suspected in breeds that have not been previously noted to have a predisposition to the DCM phenotype. This study hypothesized that over 210 days, dogs fed diets with varying amounts of animal-sourced protein and carbohydrate sources would not be negatively impacted in terms of their cardiac parameters and function.MethodsThirty-two purebred beagles and 33 mixed-breed hounds were randomized into four diet groups and studied for 210 days. The diet groups were as follows: the high-animal-protein grain-free (HAGF) group, the low-animal-protein grain-free (LAGF) group, the high-animal-protein grain-inclusive (HAGI), and the low-animal-protein grain-inclusive (LAGI) group. Cardiac-specific biomarkers, endomyocardial biopsies, and linear and volumetric echocardiographic parameters were evaluated.ResultsThere was a treatment-by-day-by-breed effect observed for the normalized left ventricular internal diameter at end-diastole (p = 0.0387) and for the normalized left ventricular internal diameter at end-systole (p = 0.0178). On day 210, mixed-breed hounds fed the LAGI diet had a smaller normalized left ventricular internal diameter at end-diastole than on day 90. On day 210, beagles fed the LAGF diet had a larger normalized left ventricular internal diameter at end-systole than those fed the LAGI diet. Fractional shortening for beagles in the LAGF group was significantly lower (p = 0.007) than for those in the HAGI and LAGI groups. Cardiac-specific biomarkers and endomyocardial biopsies were not significantly different between breeds, diets, and various time points.DiscussionThis study did not detect the development of cardiac dysfunction throughout the study period through the echocardiographic parameters measured, select cardiac biomarkers, or endomyocardial biopsies. There were noted interactions of treatment, breed, and time; therefore, isolating a diet association was not possible. Future research should further investigate the other factors that may help to identify the variable(s) and possible mechanisms underlying suspected diet-associated DCM in dogs

    sj-docx-9-hss-10.1177_15563316231183380 – Supplemental material for Principles of Photography and Videography: Lessons From Orthoplastic Sarcoma Surgery

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    Supplemental material, sj-docx-9-hss-10.1177_15563316231183380 for Principles of Photography and Videography: Lessons From Orthoplastic Sarcoma Surgery by Jessica D. Blum, Robert C. Clark, Alexander N. Berk, Garrison Leach, Riley A. Dean, Dillan F. Villavisanis, Frank E. Chiarappa and Chris M. Reid in HSS Journal®</p

    sj-docx-6-hss-10.1177_15563316231183380 – Supplemental material for Principles of Photography and Videography: Lessons From Orthoplastic Sarcoma Surgery

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    Supplemental material, sj-docx-6-hss-10.1177_15563316231183380 for Principles of Photography and Videography: Lessons From Orthoplastic Sarcoma Surgery by Jessica D. Blum, Robert C. Clark, Alexander N. Berk, Garrison Leach, Riley A. Dean, Dillan F. Villavisanis, Frank E. Chiarappa and Chris M. Reid in HSS Journal®</p

    Standardization of flow cytometry and cell sorting to enable a transcriptomic analysis in a multi-site sarcoidosis study

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    The contribution and regulation of various CD4+ T cell lineages that occur with remitting vs progressive courses in sarcoidosis are poorly understood. We developed a multiparameter flow cytometry panel to sort these CD4+ T cell lineages followed by measurement of their functional potential using RNA-sequencing analysis at six-month intervals across multiple study sites. To obtain good quality RNA for sequencing, we relied on chemokine receptor expression to identify and sort lineages. To minimize gene expression changes induced by perturbations of T cells and avoid protein denaturation caused by freeze/thaw cycles, we optimized our protocols using freshly isolated samples at each study site. To accomplish this study, we had to overcome significant standardization challenges across multiple sites. Here, we detail standardization considerations for cell processing, flow staining, data acquisition, sorting parameters, and RNA quality control analysis that were performed as part of the NIH-sponsored, multi-center study, BRonchoscopy at Initial sarcoidosis diagnosis Targeting longitudinal Endpoints (BRITE). After several rounds of iterative optimization, we identified the following aspects as critical for successful standardization: 1) alignment of PMT voltages across sites using CS&T/rainbow bead technology; 2) a single template created in the cytometer program that was used by all sites to gate cell populations during data acquisition and cell sorting; 3) use of standardized lyophilized flow cytometry staining cocktails to reduce technical error during processing; 4) development and implementation of a standardized Manual of Procedures. After standardization of cell sorting, we were able to determine the minimum number of sorted cells necessary for next generation sequencing through analysis of RNA quality and quantity from sorted T cell populations. Overall, we found that implementing a multi-parameter cell sorting with RNA-seq analysis clinical study across multiple study sites requires iteratively tested standardized procedures to ensure comparable and high-quality results
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