628 research outputs found

    Design and performance of the ENUBET monitored neutrino beam

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    The ENUBET project is aimed at designing and experimentally demonstrating the concept of monitored neutrino beams. These novel beams are enhanced by an instrumented decay tunnel, whose detectors reconstruct large-angle charged leptons produced in the tunnel and give a direct estimate of the neutrino flux at the source. These facilities are thus the ideal tool for high-precision neutrino cross-section measurements at the GeV scale because they offer superior control of beam systematics with respect to existing facilities. In this paper, we present the first end-to-end design of a monitored neutrino beam capable of monitoring lepton production at the single particle level. This goal is achieved by a new focusing system without magnetic horns, a 20 m normal-conducting transfer line for charge and momentum selection, and a 40 m tunnel instrumented with cost-effective particle detectors. Employing such a design, we show that percent precision in cross-section measurements can be achieved at the CERN SPS complex with existing neutrino detectors

    Post-LS3 Experimental Options in ECN3

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    International audienceThe Experimental Cavern North 3 (ECN3) is an underground experimental cavern on the CERN Prévessin site. ECN3 currently hosts the NA62 experiment, with a physics programme devoted to rare kaon decays and searches of hidden particles approved until Long Shutdown 3 (LS3). Several options are proposed on the longer term in order to make best use of the worldwide unique potential of the high-intensity/high-energy proton beam extracted from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in ECN3. The current status of their study by the CERN Physics Beyond Colliders (PBC) Study Group is presented, including considerations on beam requirements and upgrades, detector R&D and construction, schedules and cost, as well as physics potential within the CERN and worldwide landscape

    Towards a muon collider

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    A muon collider would enable the big jump ahead in energy reach that is needed for a fruitful exploration of fundamental interactions. The challenges of producing muon collisions at high luminosity and 10 TeV centre of mass energy are being investigated by the recently-formed International Muon Collider Collaboration. This Review summarises the status and the recent advances on muon colliders design, physics and detector studies. The aim is to provide a global perspective of the field and to outline directions for future work

    Post-LS3 Experimental Options in ECN3

    No full text
    International audienceThe Experimental Cavern North 3 (ECN3) is an underground experimental cavern on the CERN Prévessin site. ECN3 currently hosts the NA62 experiment, with a physics programme devoted to rare kaon decays and searches of hidden particles approved until Long Shutdown 3 (LS3). Several options are proposed on the longer term in order to make best use of the worldwide unique potential of the high-intensity/high-energy proton beam extracted from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in ECN3. The current status of their study by the CERN Physics Beyond Colliders (PBC) Study Group is presented, including considerations on beam requirements and upgrades, detector R&D and construction, schedules and cost, as well as physics potential within the CERN and worldwide landscape

    New detection systems for an enhanced sensitivity in key stellar (n,ő≥) measurements

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    Neutron capture cross-section measurements are fundamental in the study of astrophysical phenomena, such as the slow neutron capture (s-) process of nucleosynthesis operating in red-giant and massive stars. However, neutron capture measurements via the time-of-flight (TOF) technique on key s-process nuclei are often challenging. Difficulties arise from the limited mass (‚ąľmg) available and the high sample-related background in the case of the unstable s-process branching points. Measurements on neutron magic nuclei, that act as s-process bottlenecks, are affected by low (n,ő≥) cross sections and a dominant neutron scattering background. Overcoming these experimental challenges requires the combination of facilities with high instantaneous flux, such as n_TOFEAR2, with detection systems with an enhanced detection sensitivity and high counting rate capabilities. This contribution reviews some of the latest detector developments in detection systems for (n,ő≥) measurements at n_TOF, such as i-TED, an innovative detection system which exploits the Compton imaging technique to reduce the dominant neutron scattering background and s-TED, a highly segmented total energy detector intended for high flux facilities. The discussion will be illustrated with results of the first measurement of key the s-process branching-point reaction 79Se(n,ő≥).Title in Web of Science: New detection systems for an enhanced sensitivity in key stellar (n,gamma) measurements</p

    Monitored neutrino beams and the next generation of high precision cross section experiments

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    The main source of systematic uncertainty on neutrino cross section measurements at the GeV scale originates from the poor knowledge of the initial flux. The reduction of this uncertainty to 1% can be achieved through the monitoring of charged leptons produced in association with neutrinos. The goal of the ENUBET ERC project is to prove the feasibility of such a monitored neutrino beam. In this contribution, the final results of the ERC project, together with the complete assessment of the feasibility of its concept, are presented. An overview of the detector technology for a next generation of high precision neutrino-nucleus cross section measurements, to be performed with the ENUBET neutrino beam, is also given

    High resolution

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    Neutron capture cross section measurements of isotopes close to s-process branching-points are of fundamental importance for the understanding of this nucleosynthesis mechanism through which about 50% of the elements heavier than iron are produced. We present in this contribution the results corresponding to the high resolution measurement, for first time ever, of the 80Se(n, ő≥) cross section, in which 98 resonances never measured before have been reported. As a consequence, ten times more precise values for the MACS have been obtained compared to previous accepted value adopted in the astrophysical KADoNiS data base

    Measurement of the 77Se(n,ő≥)^{77}Se ( n , ő≥ ) cross section up to 200 keV at the n_TOF facility at CERN

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    The 77Se(n,ő≥)^{77}Se ( n , ő≥ ) reaction is of importance for 77Se^{77}Se abundance during the slow neutron capture process in massive stars. We have performed a new measurement of the 77Se^{77}Se radiative neutron capture cross section at the Neutron Time-of-Flight facility at CERN. Resonance capture kernels were derived up to 51 keV and cross sections up to 200 keV. Maxwellian-averaged cross sections were calculated for stellar temperatures between kT=5¬†keVkT=5 \space keV and kT=100¬†keVkT=100\space keV, with uncertainties between 4.2% and 5.7%. Our results lead to substantial decreases of 14% and 19% in 77Se^{77}Se abundances produced through the slow neutron capture process in selected stellar models of 15M‚äô15M‚äô and 2M‚äô2M‚äô, respectively, compared to using previous recommendation of the cross section
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