888 research outputs found

    CEPC Technical Design Report -- Accelerator

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    International audienceThe Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) is a large scientific project initiated and hosted by China, fostered through extensive collaboration with international partners. The complex comprises four accelerators: a 30 GeV Linac, a 1.1 GeV Damping Ring, a Booster capable of achieving energies up to 180 GeV, and a Collider operating at varying energy modes (Z, W, H, and ttbar). The Linac and Damping Ring are situated on the surface, while the Booster and Collider are housed in a 100 km circumference underground tunnel, strategically accommodating future expansion with provisions for a Super Proton Proton Collider (SPPC). The CEPC primarily serves as a Higgs factory. In its baseline design with synchrotron radiation (SR) power of 30 MW per beam, it can achieve a luminosity of 5e34 /cm^2/s^1, resulting in an integrated luminosity of 13 /ab for two interaction points over a decade, producing 2.6 million Higgs bosons. Increasing the SR power to 50 MW per beam expands the CEPC's capability to generate 4.3 million Higgs bosons, facilitating precise measurements of Higgs coupling at sub-percent levels, exceeding the precision expected from the HL-LHC by an order of magnitude. This Technical Design Report (TDR) follows the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (Pre-CDR, 2015) and the Conceptual Design Report (CDR, 2018), comprehensively detailing the machine's layout and performance, physical design and analysis, technical systems design, R&D and prototyping efforts, and associated civil engineering aspects. Additionally, it includes a cost estimate and a preliminary construction timeline, establishing a framework for forthcoming engineering design phase and site selection procedures. Construction is anticipated to begin around 2027-2028, pending government approval, with an estimated duration of 8 years. The commencement of experiments could potentially initiate in the mid-2030s

    CEPC Technical Design Report -- Accelerator

    No full text
    International audienceThe Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) is a large scientific project initiated and hosted by China, fostered through extensive collaboration with international partners. The complex comprises four accelerators: a 30 GeV Linac, a 1.1 GeV Damping Ring, a Booster capable of achieving energies up to 180 GeV, and a Collider operating at varying energy modes (Z, W, H, and ttbar). The Linac and Damping Ring are situated on the surface, while the Booster and Collider are housed in a 100 km circumference underground tunnel, strategically accommodating future expansion with provisions for a Super Proton Proton Collider (SPPC). The CEPC primarily serves as a Higgs factory. In its baseline design with synchrotron radiation (SR) power of 30 MW per beam, it can achieve a luminosity of 5e34 /cm^2/s^1, resulting in an integrated luminosity of 13 /ab for two interaction points over a decade, producing 2.6 million Higgs bosons. Increasing the SR power to 50 MW per beam expands the CEPC's capability to generate 4.3 million Higgs bosons, facilitating precise measurements of Higgs coupling at sub-percent levels, exceeding the precision expected from the HL-LHC by an order of magnitude. This Technical Design Report (TDR) follows the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (Pre-CDR, 2015) and the Conceptual Design Report (CDR, 2018), comprehensively detailing the machine's layout and performance, physical design and analysis, technical systems design, R&D and prototyping efforts, and associated civil engineering aspects. Additionally, it includes a cost estimate and a preliminary construction timeline, establishing a framework for forthcoming engineering design phase and site selection procedures. Construction is anticipated to begin around 2027-2028, pending government approval, with an estimated duration of 8 years. The commencement of experiments could potentially initiate in the mid-2030s

    CEPC Technical Design Report -- Accelerator

    No full text
    International audienceThe Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) is a large scientific project initiated and hosted by China, fostered through extensive collaboration with international partners. The complex comprises four accelerators: a 30 GeV Linac, a 1.1 GeV Damping Ring, a Booster capable of achieving energies up to 180 GeV, and a Collider operating at varying energy modes (Z, W, H, and ttbar). The Linac and Damping Ring are situated on the surface, while the Booster and Collider are housed in a 100 km circumference underground tunnel, strategically accommodating future expansion with provisions for a Super Proton Proton Collider (SPPC). The CEPC primarily serves as a Higgs factory. In its baseline design with synchrotron radiation (SR) power of 30 MW per beam, it can achieve a luminosity of 5e34 /cm^2/s^1, resulting in an integrated luminosity of 13 /ab for two interaction points over a decade, producing 2.6 million Higgs bosons. Increasing the SR power to 50 MW per beam expands the CEPC's capability to generate 4.3 million Higgs bosons, facilitating precise measurements of Higgs coupling at sub-percent levels, exceeding the precision expected from the HL-LHC by an order of magnitude. This Technical Design Report (TDR) follows the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (Pre-CDR, 2015) and the Conceptual Design Report (CDR, 2018), comprehensively detailing the machine's layout and performance, physical design and analysis, technical systems design, R&D and prototyping efforts, and associated civil engineering aspects. Additionally, it includes a cost estimate and a preliminary construction timeline, establishing a framework for forthcoming engineering design phase and site selection procedures. Construction is anticipated to begin around 2027-2028, pending government approval, with an estimated duration of 8 years. The commencement of experiments could potentially initiate in the mid-2030s

    An investigation on the impact of blue and green spatial pattern alterations on the urban thermal environment: A case study of Shanghai

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    Consistent urbanization and global warming escalates the summer temperatures of the urban, significantly impacting daily lives and endangering well-being. It is difficult to balance urban construction and increasing the blue-green space. Hence, understanding the impact of changes in the blue-green spatial patterns in different spaces on the urban thermal environment is beneficial to the rational layout of urban patterns. Drawing from the case study of Shanghai, by employing bivariate spatial autocorrelation and multiscale geographically weighted regression, the spatial interplay between changes in the blue-green spatial distribution and modifications in land surface temperature grades is scrutinized, thus unraveling the underlying mechanisms of their mutual influence. The findings reveal the following: (1) The transformation of the blue-green spatial pattern exhibited substantial discrepancies between the northern and southern sectors. (2) The alteration of the thermal environment in Shanghai varies significantly spatially and is characterized by a decrease in temperature grade in the southwestern suburbs, an increase in the east, and almost no change in the central urban region. (3) Furthermore, the correlation between the extent of the change in the blue-green spatial pattern and the change in land surface temperature manifested spatial unevenness. (4) Finally, the mechanism underlying the changes of alterations in the blue-green spatial pattern on the thermal environment of the city emanates primarily from the influence of heat exchange areas. The spatial instability of the influence of blue-green spatial pattern on land surface temperature can provide implications for urban planners

    Data_Sheet_1_Effects of coffee pericarp and litter mulsching on soil microbiomes diversity and functions in a tropical coffee plantation, South China.docx

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    In recent decades, ecological cyclic cultivation models have attracted increasing attention, primarily because the decomposition of crop residues and litter enhances soil organic matter content, thereby altering the soil microenvironment and regulating the diversity and functions of soil microbial communities. However, the effects of different coffee waste mulching on the diversity of soil microbial communities and their functions are still unclear. Therefore, this study set up four kinds of covering treatments: uncovered coffee waste (C), covered coffee litter (L), covered coffee pericarp (P), and both covered coffee litter and pericarp (PL). The results showed that compared to the control, coffee pericarp mulching significantly increased the soil available potassium (SAK) content by 18.45% and alkali hydrolyzed N (SAN) content by 17.29%. Furthermore, coffee pericarp mulching significantly increased bacterial richness and diversity by 7.75 and 2.79%, respectively, while litter mulching had little effect on bacterial abundance and diversity was smaller. The pericarp mulching significantly increased the abundance of Proteus by 22.35% and the abundance of Chlamydomonas by 80.04%, but significantly decreased the abundance of Cyanobacteria by 68.38%, while the coffee litter mulching significantly increased the abundance of Chlamydomonas by 48.28%, but significantly decreased the abundance of Cyanobacteria by 73.98%. The increase in soil SAK promoted bacterial Anoxygenic_photoautotrophy, Nitrogen_respiration, Nitrate_respiration, Nitrite_respiration, and Denitrification functions. The above results indicate that the increase in available soil potassium and alkali hydrolyzed N content under coffee pericarp cover is the main reason for promoting the diversity and richness of bacterial community and promoting the changes in bacterial community structure and function. The use of coffee pericarps in coffee plantations for ecological recycling helps to improve the diversity of the soil microbial community and maintain the relative stability of the microbial community structure and function, promoting soil health conservation and the sustainable development of related industries.</p

    Effect of the Ni/Co ratio on the structural and initial oxidation properties of NiCo-based superalloys revealed by in situ microscopy

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    Oxidation is one of the main failure modes of superalloys, and the initial oxidation of a superalloy provides clues for its failure analysis. NiCo-based superalloys exhibit superior mechanical properties, but their oxidation behaviour is still debatable, especially in terms of the ratio of Ni/Co. Here, we show the effect of the Ni/Co ratio on the initial oxidation behaviour at the nanoscale by in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), which provides the initial microstructural changes in the γ/γ′ structure-based alloy. The results indicate that Ni-rich alloys exhibit better structural stability at high temperatures than Ni-deficient alloys. A high content of Ni promotes the formation of a dense oxide layer, inhibits the oxidation rate, and improves the oxidation resistance. This result will help to elucidate the basic process of oxide formation in NiCo-based single-crystal superalloys and provide ideas for improving their oxidation resistance for alloy design

    Identification of the communal pathogenesis and immune landscape between viral myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy

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    Abstract Aims Studies have confirmed that viral myocarditis (VMC) is one of the risk factors for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The molecular mechanisms underlying the progression from VMC to DCM remain unclear and require further investigation. Methods and results The mRNA microarray datasets GSE57338 (DCM) and GSE1145 (VMC) were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The candidate key genes were further screened using weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA), protein–protein interaction and external dataset validation, and the correlation between the candidate key genes and immune cells and the signalling pathways of the candidate key genes were observed by enrichment analysis and immune infiltration analysis. The expression of key genes was validated in the external dataset GSE35182. The crosstalk genes between DCM and VMC were mainly enriched in ‘transcriptional misregulation in cancer’, ‘FoxO signalling pathway’, ‘AGE‐RAGE signalling pathway in diabetic complications’, ‘thyroid hormone signalling pathway’, ‘AMPK signalling pathway’, and other signalling pathways. The immune infiltration analysis indicated that VMC was mainly associated with resting dendritic cells and M0 macrophages, while DCM was mainly associated with monocytes, M0 macrophages, CD8+ T cells, resting CD4 memory T cells, naive CD4+ T cells, and resting mast cells. In DCM‐related dataset GSE57338 and VMC‐related dataset GSE1145, a total of 18 candidate key genes were differentially expressed. BLC6, FOXO1, and UBE2M were identified as the key genes that lead to the progression from VMC to DCM by GSE35182. Conclusions Three key genes (BLC6, FOXO1, and UBE2M) were identified and provided new insights into the diagnosis and treatment of VMC with DCM

    CEPC Technical Design Report -- Accelerator