20 research outputs found

    Urban unemployment in Papua New Guinea - it's criminal

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    Much has been said about the enormous unemployment problem in Papua New Guinea?s urban centres and the terrible crime situation which it has generated. The gravity of these problems is profound yet little is really known about the extent of unemployment and crime. This article reports on a survey carried out in 1995 on unemployment and crime in Papua New Guinea. Over 32,000 people in urban centres depend on crime as their main source of income, representing 14.8 per cent of the urban workforce. Prostitution accounts for 13.6 per cent of the female urban workforce. The survey found that the earnings of criminals do not differ significantly from the relatively high wages of unskilled labour in the formal sector. With this in mind the remedy to the crime problem is not so much job creation, but an attack on the incentives for crime

    The urban labour market in Papua New Guinea, post-deregulation

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    This paper documents the sequence of interventions followed by deregulation of Papua New Guinea?s urban labour market. Intervention began in 1972 and was mainly in the form of a heavily distorting minimum wage for unskilled workers. 1992 saw the dismantling of these minimum wage restrictions amidst fears of a dramatic deterioration of workers? conditions. A survey of private urban employers was undertaken in 1995 to determine the shape of the urban formal labour market. Given the opportunity for wholesale adjustments to nominal wages, there has been only minimal change. Nevertheless, real wage reductions have been substantial for both unskilled and skilled labour. The survey provides other insights into the characteristics of the formal labour market and this paper gives an overview and interpretation of these results

    Tourism in Papua New Guinea: a comparative perspective

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    Papua New Guinea is a nation of immense natural beauty and incredible cultural diversity, yet it is completely shunned as a tourist destination despite being so close to the enormous East Asian market. This paradox is almost completely due to the law and order situation, which United Nations data shows to be as bad as anywhere in the world. The tourism industry provides a golden opportunity for economic development, but the law and order problem will need to be addressed first

    A general equilibrium model of Papua New Guinea

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    This paper outlines the most recent version of a computable general equilibrium model of Papua New Guinea operated by the National Centre for Development Studies. The purpose is to give a complete overview of the structure of the model. In general the model follows the ORANI framework, but with crime being so prevalent in Papua New Guinea, particular attention is paid to its adaptation in the mode. An important feature of this model is its ability to derive an equivalent variation measure of the change in welfare, disaggregated across various components. Part I of the paper discusses the model’s variables, Part II contains definitions and equations

    Book Review: Tourism, ethnicity and the state in Asian and Pacific societies

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    Oil price vulnerability in the Pacific

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    The Papua New Guinea gas project: fuel for economic development?

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    If the Papua New Guinea gas project proceeds, it will provide a major boost to the economy which will be sustained for at least the next two decades. This will help to offset the effects of declining exports of oil due to depletion of reserves. But the main domestic beneficiary of the gas project will be the government; so the extent to which the people of Papua New Guinea benefit, and how equitably those benefits are distributed, will depend critically on how wisely the government utilises the revenues

    Taking a piece of the pie: Papua New Guinea's log exports and optimal taxation

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    With economic turmoil in East Asia causing a collapse in Papua New Guinea's export market for logs, there has been an announcement of yet another change in the export tax regime. The wisdom of the large reduction in rates is examined in the context of what would be optimal given the various constraints and complexities in the market. Logging contractors are predominantly foreign owned and the use of domestic factors is limited, so in the absence of an appropriate revenue system, resource rents will be lost to Papua New Guinea and transferred abroad. But at the same time, a constraint to designing a revenue system is the need to avoid distorting production. It is considered that an ideal system is likely to be too costly to implement and an export tax regime represents a good second-best alternative

    Recent economic events in Papua New Guinea: a continuing drought in development

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    Papua New Guinea continues to fall short of its potential in terms of economic and social development. It has extraordinary wealth in mineral, forestry and fishing resources and an enormous comparative advantage in tourism, yet social indicators place it amongst the poorest nations in the world and economic growth since independence has barely kept pace with population growth. The devastating drought was a major setback for the economy. While a full recovery from the drought is expected from the second half of 1998, the enormous frustration of the people will continue as there appears little prospect of a change in policy direction to secure Papua New Guinea?s great potential for prosperity
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