3 research outputs found

    EFFECT OF PULSED GALVANIC ELECTRO STIMULATION AND ULTRASUONBD ON BURN HEALING. A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIALS

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    The goal of this study is to evaluate the effect of pulsed galvanic electro stimulation of high voltage and ultrasound on the healing of induced burn applied on rats. 48 rats (Sprague Dawley), mass between 300g and 400g, age between 3 months and 4 months. These rats are putted and the same experimental conditions of alimentation and hygiene. Rats are divided into 3 groups of 16 rats each. Each rat was induced to a uniform burn of second degree by a specific device fabricated specially to this study. Group ES undergoes a treatment of electro stimulation by a pulsed galvanic current of high voltage for 10 min daily during 2 weeks. Group US undergoes a treatment of pulsed ultrasound of 1w/cm² for 2 minutes daily during 2 weeks Group control GC undergoes placebo treatment. Measure are done by digital camera, results are analyzed by specific program (AutoCad) on computer. Wound healing between the three groups are different and statistical tests ( T-tests and ANOVA) done between the two groups US and GC show no significant difference in the reduction of the surface of healing between them (α˃0.05), whereas the comparison between ES group and the two others group was significant (α˂0.05). At the end of the second week of treatment, the best healing was presented in ES group where the wound was healed by 61.4 % whereas the groups GC and US were 11.9 % and 14.9 % respectively. Therefore the ES group have the best results between than others groups (GC and US)

    VALIDITY OF PROPRIOCEPTIVE REHABILITATION FOR ANKLE INSTABILITY BASED ON FREEMAN BOARD TRAINING

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    Background: Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. Objective: up to date, many studies have reported the effects of Proprioception training on ankle joint stability. But fewer who studied the validity of dynamic Proprioception on ankle instability. The purpose of this pilot study was to conduct the effects of a 4-week dynamic neuromuscular training program in addition to the rehabilitation treatment for ankle instability Methods: 26 sportive men were exposed to a progressive 4-week dynamic neuromuscular training program which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric. The following criteria were considered: Number of shaking of leg in a minute standing on freeman board (one minute stand), Time of balance on freeman board ( balance), Maximal resistance for ankle dorsal flexion, plantar flexion, Inversion and eversion,Muscle reaction for ankle dorsal flexion, plantar flexion, Inversion and eversion. Measurements were rated within 3 trials for each criterion before and after each session for the affected leg. For the non-affected leg same criteria were measured before and after session without applying the rehabilitation protocol Results: a high significant (p=.000<0.05) a progress is noted during rehabilitation protocol,. Results show high correlation between one minute stands and balance; one minute stand and muscle reaction; balance and maximal resistance was significant. Results show non-significance of correlation between muscle reaction and maximal resistance for ankle dorsal flexion, plantar flexion, Inversion and eversion. Moreover, we can notice that training period has had a slight effect on the non-affected side. Conclusions: The 4-week dynamic neuromuscular training program improves the parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI

    VALIDITY OF PROPRIOCEPTIVE REHABILITATION FOR ANKLE INSTABILITY BASED ON FREEMAN BOARD TRAINING

    Get PDF
    Background: Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. Objective: up to date, many studies have reported the effects of Proprioception training on ankle joint stability. But fewer who studied the validity of dynamic Proprioception on ankle instability. The purpose of this pilot study was to conduct the effects of a 4-week dynamic neuromuscular training program in addition to the rehabilitation treatment for ankle instability Methods: 26 sportive men were exposed to a progressive 4-week dynamic neuromuscular training program which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric. The following criteria were considered: Number of shaking of leg in a minute standing on freeman board (one minute stand), Time of balance on freeman board ( balance), Maximal resistance for ankle dorsal flexion, plantar flexion, Inversion and eversion,Muscle reaction for ankle dorsal flexion, plantar flexion, Inversion and eversion. Measurements were rated within 3 trials for each criterion before and after each session for the affected leg. For the non-affected leg same criteria were measured before and after session without applying the rehabilitation protocol Results: a high significant (p=.000<0.05) a progress is noted during rehabilitation protocol,. Results show high correlation between one minute stands and balance; one minute stand and muscle reaction; balance and maximal resistance was significant. Results show non-significance of correlation between muscle reaction and maximal resistance for ankle dorsal flexion, plantar flexion, Inversion and eversion. Moreover, we can notice that training period has had a slight effect on the non-affected side. Conclusions: The 4-week dynamic neuromuscular training program improves the parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI
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