133 research outputs found

    Evaluation of coronary artery abnormalities in Williams syndrome patients using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and CT angiography

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    Background: Sudden death risk in Williams syndrome (WS) patients has been shown to be 25–100 times higher than in the general population. This study aims to detect coronary artery anomalies and myocardial perfusion defects in WS patients using noninvasive diagnostic methods. Methods: This study features 38 patients diagnosed with WS. In addition to physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) angiography and rest/dipyridamole stress technetium-99m sestamibi (99mTc-sestamibi) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) were performed. Results: Twenty-one (55%) patients were male; 17 (45%) were female. The average patient age was 12 ± 5 years (2.5–26 years); the average follow-up period was 7.2 ± 4.2 years (6 months–18 years). Cardiovascular abnormalities were found in 89% of patients, the most common one being supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS). CT angiography revealed coronary anomalies in 10 (26%) patients, the most common ones being ectasia of the left main coronary artery and proximal right coronary artery as well as myocardial bridging. SVAS was present in 80% of patients with coronary artery anomalies. 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT MPS revealed findings possibly consistent with myocardial ischemia in 29% of patients, and ischemia in 7 out of 10 patients (70%) with coronary anomalies shown on CT angiography (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Coronary artery abnormalities are relatively common in WS patients and are often accompanied by SVAS. CT angiography and dipyridamole 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT MPS seem to be less invasive methods of detecting coronary artery anomalies and myocardial perfusion defects in WS patients

    Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) Deficiency Causes the Autosomal Recessive Form of the Hyper-IgM Syndrome (HIGM2)

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    AbstractThe activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) gene, specifically expressed in germinal center B cells in mice, is a member of the cytidine deaminase family. We herein report mutations in the human counterpart of AID in patients with the autosomal recessive form of hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM2). Three major abnormalities characterize AID deficiency: (1) the absence of immunoglobulin class switch recombination, (2) the lack of immunoglobulin somatic hypermutations, and (3) lymph node hyperplasia caused by the presence of giant germinal centers. The phenotype observed in HIGM2 patients (and in AID−/− mice) demonstrates the absolute requirement for AID in several crucial steps of B cell terminal differentiation necessary for efficient antibody responses

    CLP1 Founder Mutation Links tRNA Splicing and Maturation to Cerebellar Development and Neurodegeneration

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    SummaryNeurodegenerative diseases can occur so early as to affect neurodevelopment. From a cohort of more than 2,000 consanguineous families with childhood neurological disease, we identified a founder mutation in four independent pedigrees in cleavage and polyadenylation factor I subunit 1 (CLP1). CLP1 is a multifunctional kinase implicated in tRNA, mRNA, and siRNA maturation. Kinase activity of the CLP1 mutant protein was defective, and the tRNA endonuclease complex (TSEN) was destabilized, resulting in impaired pre-tRNA cleavage. Germline clp1 null zebrafish showed cerebellar neurodegeneration that was rescued by wild-type, but not mutant, human CLP1 expression. Patient-derived induced neurons displayed both depletion of mature tRNAs and accumulation of unspliced pre-tRNAs. Transfection of partially processed tRNA fragments into patient cells exacerbated an oxidative stress-induced reduction in cell survival. Our data link tRNA maturation to neuronal development and neurodegeneration through defective CLP1 function in humans

    European recommendations integrating genetic testing into multidisciplinary management of sudden cardiac death.

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    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) accounts for 10-20% of total mortality, i.e., one in five individuals will eventually die suddenly. Given the substantial genetic component of SCD in younger cases, postmortem genetic testing may be particularly useful in elucidating etiological factors in the cause of death in this subset. The identification of genes responsible for inherited cardiac diseases have led to the organization of cardiogenetic consultations in many countries worldwide. Expert recommendations are available, emphasizing the importance of genetic testing and appropriate information provision of affected individuals, as well as their relatives. However, the context of postmortem genetic testing raises some particular ethical, legal, and practical (including economic or financial) challenges. The Public and Professional Policy Committee of the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG), together with international experts, developed recommendations on management of SCD after a workshop sponsored by the Brocher Foundation and ESHG in November 2016. These recommendations have been endorsed by the ESHG Board, the European Council of Legal Medicine, the European Society of Cardiology working group on myocardial and pericardial diseases, the ERN GUARD-HEART, and the Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology. They emphasize the importance of increasing the proportion of both medical and medicolegal autopsies and educating the professionals. Multidisciplinary collaboration is of utmost importance. Public funding should be allocated to reach these goals and allow public health evaluation

    Characterization of greater middle eastern genetic variation for enhanced disease gene discovery

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    The Greater Middle East (GME) has been a central hub of human migration and population admixture. The tradition of consanguinity, variably practiced in the Persian Gulf region, North Africa, and Central Asia1-3, has resulted in an elevated burden of recessive disease4. Here we generated a whole-exome GME variome from 1,111 unrelated subjects. We detected substantial diversity and admixture in continental and subregional populations, corresponding to several ancient founder populations with little evidence of bottlenecks. Measured consanguinity rates were an order of magnitude above those in other sampled populations, and the GME population exhibited an increased burden of runs of homozygosity (ROHs) but showed no evidence for reduced burden of deleterious variation due to classically theorized ‘genetic purging’. Applying this database to unsolved recessive conditions in the GME population reduced the number of potential disease-causing variants by four- to sevenfold. These results show variegated genetic architecture in GME populations and support future human genetic discoveries in Mendelian and population genetics

    TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

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    Tiina Paunio on työryhmÀn UK10K jÀsen.The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions.Peer reviewe
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