31 research outputs found

    The qualitative orientation in medical education research

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    The Influence of Aricept on stress and depression in caregivers

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    This study investigates the influence of Aricept (Donepezil Hydrochloride) on stress and depression in relatives (jV=T0) who identified themselves as the primary caregivers of a spouse or parent with Alzheimer's Disease. Measures were administered to carers at baseline and 8-12 weeks after their dependant's treatment with Aricept had commenced in order to assess improvement in levels of stress and depression. Data was also collected from a matched sample (A/=ll) to compare levels of stress and depression in carers whose relative was not receiving Aricept. The relationship of patient and carer variables (rated by caregivers) to carer stress and depression was also investigated to see if these improve following pharmacological treatment for dementia. Measures include the Relative's Stress Scale (RSS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Behaviour and Mood Disturbance Scale (BMDS) and Gilleard et al. 's (1984) Problem Checklist. Quantitative and qualitative results are reported. Results are compared to previous findings and recommendations for future research are discussed

    Disembodied, dehumanised but safe and feasible : the social-spatial flow of a pandemic OSCE

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    Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank all those who took part in the OSCE under study and who contributed their time to be interviewed.Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    Won' t you stay just a little bit longer? A discrete choice experiment of UK doctors’ preferences for delaying retirement

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    Funding Information: The survey instrument and all available data can be obtained by contacting the corresponding author (JC). Our thanks to those friends and colleagues whose discussions about retirement, lifetime allowances and pensions ceilings were the motivation for this study. Thanks to all those who participated in qualitative interviews and in developing, piloting and completing the survey. Thanks also go to BMA Scotland for the distribution of invitations. This study was funded by a grant from the University of Aberdeen Development Trust (UOA Ref: RG14022), and the qualitative data collection (reported separately) was supported by funding from BMA Scotland (UOA Ref: RG14434).Peer reviewedPostprin

    ATLAS Run 1 searches for direct pair production of third-generation squarks at the Large Hadron Collider

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    Asthma and psychological dysfunction

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    Despite effective treatment, asthma outcomes remain suboptimal. Anxiety and depression occur more commonly in people with asthma than expected, and are associated with poor asthma outcomes. The direction of the relationship and the mechanisms underlying it are uncertain. Whether screening for and treating co-morbid anxiety and depression can improve asthma outcomes is unclear from the current evidence. Primary care clinicians treating asthma should be aware of the possibility of psychological dysfunction in asthmatics, particularly those with poor control. Further research is required to assess the importance of detecting and treating these conditions in community asthma car

    Interprofessional collaboration (or lack thereof) between faculty and learning technologists in the creation of digital learning

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    Abstract Background As digital learning becomes more prevalent and important in health professions education, learning technologists play increasingly central roles in designing and delivering learning materials. However, little is understood about the process by which learning technologists have integrated into the existing teaching and learning ecosystem, and it seems that they remain marginal and undervalued. Our aim in this paper was therefore to examine the process of interprofessional co-development of course materials as experienced by educators and learning technologists. Methods Our approach was qualitative, using individual semi-structured interviews (conducted between July 2021 to May 2022) to explore the working relationship between faculty and learning technologists. Transcripts were analysed abductively. Results We found that the attitudes of both faculty and learning technologists towards collaborating to drive digital adoption in health professions education fell into two main themes: “embrace” and “replace” – and “conflict”, which we present as a third theme. Our results revealed that faculty did not take an active and agentic role in developing their digital practices in respect of education delivery. Learning technologists positioned themselves as a resource to support faculty’s knowledge and skill gap in digital competence. There was an obvious power differential between the two groups: learning technologists lacked agency and seemed in the position of servants to faculty masters. This created barriers to effective collaboration. Conclusions By examining the process of co-development of course materials by faculty and learning technologists, we open up a space to examine the social, relational and organisational complexities associated with interprofessional collaboration in digital health professions education. Our study also has important implications for guiding educational policy to better position learning technologists to effectively collaborate with faculty and realise the potential of digital health professions education
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