25 research outputs found

    Study protocol: development and randomized controlled trial of a preventive blended care parenting intervention for parents with PTSD

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    BACKGROUND: Children of parents with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at increased risk of adverse psychological outcomes. An important risk mechanism is impaired parental functioning, including negative parenting behavior, perceived incompetence, and lack of social support. Several parenting interventions for trauma-exposed parents and parents with psychiatric disorders exist, but none have specifically targeted parents with PTSD. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a blended care preventive parenting intervention for parents with PTSD. METHODS: The intervention was adapted from an existing online intervention, KopOpOuders Self-Help. In co-creation with parents with PTSD and partners, the intervention was adapted into KopOpOuders-PTSD, by adding PTSD-specific content and three in-person-sessions with a mental health prevention professional. Effectiveness will be tested in a randomized controlled trial among N = 142 parents being treated for PTSD at Arkin Mental Health Care (control condition: treatment as usual, n = 71; intervention condition: treatment as usual + intervention, n = 71). Online questionnaires at pretest, posttest, and three-month follow-up and ecological momentary assessment at pretest and posttest will be used. Intervention effects on primary (parenting behavior) and secondary outcomes (perceived parenting competence, parental social support, parenting stress, child overall psychological problems and PTSD symptoms) will be analyzed using generalized linear mixed modeling. We will also analyze possible moderation effects of parental PTSD symptoms at pretest on primary and secondary outcomes. DISCUSSION: This study protocol describes the randomized controlled trial of KopOpOuders-PTSD, a blended care preventive parenting intervention for parents with PTSD. Findings can contribute to understanding of the effectiveness of parenting support in clinical practice for PTSD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This protocol (Version 1) was registered on 11-02-2022 at ClinicalTrials.gov under identification number NCT05237999

    Comparing a ses-sensitive and an all-ses implementation strategy to improve participation rates of patients with a lower socioeconomic background in a web-based intervention for depressive complaints: A cluster randomised trial in primary care

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    Background Depression is a major public health concern, which is most pronounced in population segments with a lower social-economic status (SES). E-health interventions for depressive complaints are proven to be effective, but their reach needs to be improved, especially among people with a lower socioeconomic status (SES). Implementing e-health interventions in the primary care setting with SES-sensitive guidance from General Practice nurses (GP nurses) may be a useful strategy to increase the reach of e-health in lower SES groups. We implemented an evidence-based online intervention that targets depressive complaints in primary care. Methods A pragmatic cluster-randomised trial was conducted in two parallel groups where a SES sensitive (SES-sens) implementation strategy with additional face-to-face guidance by GP nurses was compared to an all-SES implementation strategy. The primary outcome was the percentage of lower SES participants in either condition. Participation was defined as completing at least 1 face-to-face session and 2 online exercises. Participation rates were evaluated using logistic mixed modelling. Results In both conditions, the participation rates of lower SES participants were quite high, but were notably lower in the SES-sens implementation condition (44%) than in the all-SES implementation condition (58%). This unexpected outcome remained statistically significant even after adjusting for potential confounders between the conditions (Odds Ratio 0.43, 95%-CI 0.22 to 0.81). Less guidance was provided by the GP nurses in the SES-sens group, contrary to the implementation instructions. Conclusions From a public health point of view, it is good news that a substantial number of primary care patients with a lower SES level used the implemented e-health intervention. It is also positive that an all-SES implementation strategy performed well, and even outperformed a SES-sensitive strategy. However, this was an unexpected finding, warranting further research into tailoring implementation strategies of e-health interventions towards specific target groups in the primary care setting

    Comparing a ses-sensitive and an all-ses implementation strategy to improve participation rates of patients with a lower socioeconomic background in a web-based intervention for depressive complaints: a cluster randomised trial in primary care

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    Background: Depression is a major public health concern, which is most pronounced in population segments with a lower social-economic status (SES). E-health interventions for depressive complaints are proven to be effective, but their reach needs to be improved, especially among people with a lower socioeconomic status (SES). Implementing e-health interventions in the primary care setting with SES-sensitive guidance from General Practice nurses (GP nurses) may be a useful strategy to increase the reach of e-health in lower SES groups. We implemented an evidence-based online intervention that targets depressive complaints in primary care. Methods: A pragmatic cluster-randomised trial was conducted in two parallel groups where a SES sensitive (SES-sens) implementation strategy with additional face-to-face guidance by GP nurses was compared to an all-SES implementation strategy. The primary outcome was the percentage of lower SES participants in either condition. Participation was defined as completing at least 1 face-to-face session and 2 online exercises. Participation rates were evaluated using logistic mixed modelling. Results: In both conditions, the participation rates of lower SES participants were quite high, but were notably lower in the SES-sens implementation condition (44%) than in the all-SES implementation condition (58%). This unexpected outcome remained statistically significant even after adjusting for potential confounders between the conditions (Odds Ratio 0.43, 95%-CI 0.22 to 0.81). Less guidance was provided by the GP nurses in the SES-sens group, contrary to the implementation instructions. Conclusions: From a public health point of view, it is good news that a substantial number of primary care patients with a lower SES level used the implemented e-health intervention. It is also positive that an all-SES implementation strategy performed well, and even outperformed a SES-sensitive strategy. However, this was an unexpected finding, warranting further research into tailoring implementation strategies of e-health interventions towards specific target groups in the primary care setting. Trial registration: Netherlands Trial Register, identifier: NL6595, registered on 12 November 2017

    Effectiveness and treatment moderators of internet interventions for adult problem drinking:An individual patient data meta-analysis of 19 randomised controlled trials

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    Face-to-face brief interventions for problem drinking are effective, but they have found limited implementation in routine care and the community. Internet-based interventions could overcome this treatment gap. We investigated effectiveness and moderators of treatment outcomes in internet-based interventions for adult problem drinking (iAIs). Systematic searches were performed in medical and psychological databases to 31 December 2016. A one-stage individual patient data meta-analysis (IPDMA) was conducted with a linear mixed model complete-case approach, using baseline and first follow-up data. The primary outcome measure was mean weekly alcohol consumption in standard units (SUs, 10 grams of ethanol). Secondary outcome was treatment response (TR), defined as less than 14/21 SUs for women/men weekly. Putative participant, intervention, and study moderators were included. Robustness was verified in three sensitivity analyses: a two-stage IPDMA, a one-stage IPDMA using multiple imputation, and a missing-not-at-random (MNAR) analysis. We obtained baseline data for 14,198 adult participants (19 randomised controlled trials [RCTs], mean age 40.7 [SD = 13.2], 47.6% women). Their baseline mean weekly alcohol consumption was 38.1 SUs (SD = 26.9). Most were regular problem drinkers (80.1%, SUs 44.7, SD = 26.4) and 19.9% (SUs 11.9, SD = 4.1) were binge-only drinkers. About one third were heavy drinkers, meaning that women/men consumed, respectively, more than 35/50 SUs of alcohol at baseline (34.2%, SUs 65.9, SD = 27.1). Post-intervention data were available for 8,095 participants. Compared with controls, iAI participants showed a greater mean weekly decrease at follow-up of 5.02 SUs (95% CI -7.57 to -2.48, p < 0.001) and a higher rate of TR (odds ratio [OR] 2.20, 95% CI 1.63-2.95, p < 0.001, number needed to treat [NNT] = 4.15, 95% CI 3.06-6.62). Persons above age 55 showed higher TR than their younger counterparts (OR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.21-2.27, p = 0.002). Drinking profiles were not significantly associated with treatment outcomes. Human-supported interventions were superior to fully automated ones on both outcome measures (comparative reduction: -6.78 SUs, 95% CI -12.11 to -1.45, p = 0.013; TR: OR = 2.23, 95% CI 1.22-4.08, p = 0.009). Participants treated in iAIs based on personalised normative feedback (PNF) alone were significantly less likely to sustain low-risk drinking at follow-up than those in iAIs based on integrated therapeutic principles (OR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.29-0.93, p = 0.029). The use of waitlist control in RCTs was associated with significantly better treatment outcomes than the use of other types of control (comparative reduction: -9.27 SUs, 95% CI -13.97 to -4.57, p < 0.001; TR: OR = 3.74, 95% CI 2.13-6.53, p < 0.001). The overall quality of the RCTs was high; a major limitation included high study dropout (43%). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of our primary analyses. To our knowledge, this is the first IPDMA on internet-based interventions that has shown them to be effective in curbing various patterns of adult problem drinking in both community and healthcare settings. Waitlist control may be conducive to inflation of treatment outcomes

    An Internet-Based Guided Self-Help Intervention for Panic Symptoms: Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Background: Internet-based guided self-help is efficacious for panic disorder, but it is not known whether such treatment is effective for milder panic symptoms as well. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Don't Panic Online, an Internet-based self-help course for mild panic symptoms, which is based on cognitive behavioral principles and includes guidance by email. Methods: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial was conducted. Participants (N=126) were recruited from the general population and randomized to either the intervention group or to a waiting-list control group. Inclusion criteria were a Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report (PDSS-SR) score between 5-15 and no suicide risk. Panic symptom severity was the primary outcome measure; secondary outcome measures were anxiety and depressive symptom severity. Measurements were conducted online and took place at baseline and 12 weeks after baseline (T1). At baseline, diagnoses were obtained by telephone interviews. Results: Analyses of covariance (intention-to-treat) showed no significant differences in panic symptom reduction between groups. Completers-only analyses revealed a moderate effect size in favor of the intervention group (Cohen's d=0.73, P=.01). Only 27% of the intervention group finished lesson 4 or more (out of 6). Nonresponse at T1 was high for the total sample (42.1%). Diagnostic interviews showed that many participants suffered from comorbid depression and anxiety disorders. Conclusions: The Internet-based guided self-help course appears to be ineffective for individuals with panic symptoms. However, intervention completers did derive clinical benefits from the intervention

    Effectiveness of an online group course for adolescents and young adults with depressive symptoms: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    <p>Abstract</p> <p>Background</p> <p>Depression is a common condition whose first onset is usually in late adolescence or early adulthood. Internet-based interventions are an effective treatment approach to depression. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of a Dutch online cognitive-behavioural group course known as Master Your Mood (<it>Grip op Je Dip</it>) for young people reporting depressive symptoms. Secondary research questions involve maintenance of effect at 6 months, mediators, and predictors of better outcomes.</p> <p>Methods</p> <p>We will conduct a randomised controlled trial (RCT) in which 244 young people aged 16-25 are randomly allocated to the Grip op Je Dip (GOJD) online group course or to a waiting list control group. The participants will be recruited from the general population. The primary outcome measure will be the severity of depressive symptoms according to the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Other outcomes will include anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, HADS) and mastery (Mastery Scale). Assessments will take place in both groups at baseline and three months later. Effect maintenance will be studied in the GOJD group six months after baseline, with missing data imputed using the expectation-maximisation method. Mediators and predictors of better outcomes will also be identified.</p> <p>Discussion</p> <p>The trial should add to the body of knowledge on the effectiveness of Internet-based interventions for depression. To our knowledge, this will be the first RCT on an online group intervention in this field.</p> <p>Trial registration</p> <p><a href="http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=NTR1694">NTR1694</a></p

    Effectiveness of E-Self-help Interventions for Curbing Adult Problem Drinking: A Meta-analysis

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    Background: Self-help interventions without professional contact to curb adult problem drinking in the community are increasingly being delivered via the Internet. Objective: The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the overall effectiveness of these eHealth interventions. Methods: In all, 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), all from high-income countries, with 9 comparison conditions and a total of 1553 participants, were identified, and their combined effectiveness in reducing alcohol consumption was evaluated by means of a meta-analysis. Results: An overall medium effect size (g = 0.44, 95% CI 0.17-0.71, random effect model) was found for the 9 studies, all of which compared no-contact interventions to control conditions. The medium effect was maintained (g = 0.39; 95% CI 0.23-0.57, random effect model) after exclusion of two outliers. Type of control group, treatment location, type of analysis, and sample size did not have differential impacts on treatment outcome. A significant difference (P = .04) emerged between single-session personalized normative feedback interventions (g = 0.27, 95% CI 0.11-0.43) and more extended e- self-help (g = 0.61, 95% CI 0.33-0.90). Conclusion: E-self-help interventions without professional contact are effective in curbing adult problem drinking in high-income countries. In view of the easy scalability and low dissemination costs of such interventions, we recommend exploration of whether these could broaden the scope of effective public health interventions in low- and middle-income countries as well

    The effects of an Internet based self-help course for reducing panic symptoms - Don't Panic Online: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    <p>Abstract</p> <p>Background</p> <p>Internet based self-help for panic disorder (PD) has proven to be effective. However, studies so far have focussed on treating a full-blown disorder. Panic symptoms that do not meet DSM-IV criteria are more prevalent than the full-blown disorder and patients with sub-clinical panic symptoms are at risk of developing PD. This study is a randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate an Internet based self-help intervention for sub-clinical and mild PD compared to a waiting list control group.</p> <p>Methods</p> <p>Participants with mild or sub-clinical PD (N = 128) will be recruited in the general population. Severity of panic and anxiety symptoms are the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcomes include depressive symptoms, quality of life, loss of production and health care consumption. Assessments will take place on the Internet at baseline and three months after baseline.</p> <p>Discussion</p> <p>Results will indicate the effectiveness of Internet based self-help for sub-clinical and mild PD. Strengths of this design are the external validity and the fact that it is almost completely conducted online.</p> <p>Trial registration</p> <p>Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): <a href="http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=1639">NTR1639</a> The Netherlands Trial Register is part of the Dutch Cochrane Centre.</p

    The effects of integrative reminiscence on depressive symptomatology and mastery of older adults.

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    A quasi-experimental (non-randomized) study was conducted to study the effects of a new intervention The story of your life that combines integrative reminiscence with narrative therapy. The program consists of seven sessions of two hours and one follow-up session after 8 weeks. It is directed at community-dwelling people of 55 years and older with mild to moderate depressive symptoms. After the intervention the participants showed significantly less depressive symptoms and higher mastery, also in comparison with a waiting-list control group. Demographic factors and initial levels of depressive symptomatology and mastery were not found to moderate the effects. The effects were maintained at 3 months after completion of the intervention. Although the new program was positively evaluated by the majority of the participants there is room for improvement. Adaptations should be made, and evaluated in a randomised controlled trial

    Effectiveness of a web-based self-help smoking cessation intervention: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

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    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for many chronic and fatal illnesses. Stopping smoking directly reduces those risks. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of a web-based interactive self-help programme for smoking cessation, known as the StopSite, by comparing it to an online self-help guide. Both interventions were based on cognitive-behavioural and self-control principles, but the former provided exercises, feedback and interactive features such as one-to-one chatrooms and a user forum, which facilitated mutual support and experience sharing. METHODS AND DESIGN: We conducted a randomised controlled trial to compare the interactive intervention with the self-help guide. The primary outcome measure was prolonged abstinence from smoking. Secondary outcomes were point-prevalence abstinence, number of cigarettes smoked, and incidence of quit attempts reported at follow-up assessments. Follow-up assessments took place three and six months after a one-month grace period for starting the intervention after baseline. Analyses were based on intention-to-treat principles using a conservative imputation method for missing data, whereby non-responders were classified as smokers. DISCUSSION: The trial should add to the body of knowledge on the effectiveness of web-based self-help smoking cessation interventions. Effective web-based programmes can potentially help large numbers of smokers to quit, thus having a major public health impact. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN7442376
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