77 research outputs found

    Expanding the Spectrum of BAF-Related Disorders: De Novo Variants in SMARCC2 Cause a Syndrome with Intellectual Disability and Developmental Delay

    No full text

    Hyaluronic acid

    No full text
    In recent times, the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has considerably increased the extent of therapeutic strategies for clinical application in orthopedics. However, TERM approaches have its rules and requirements, in the respect of the biologic response of each tissue and bioactive agents which need to be considered, respected, and subject of ongoing studies. Different medical devices/products have been prematurely available on the market and used in clinics with limited success. However, other therapeutics, when used in a serious and evidence-based approach, have achieved considerable success, considering the respect for(undefined)info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersio

    Hand osteoarthritis: clinical phenotypes, molecular mechanisms and disease management

    Get PDF
    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a highly prevalent condition and the hand is the most commonly affected site. Patients with hand OA frequently report symptoms of pain, functional limitations, and frustration in undertaking everyday activities. The condition presents clinically with changes to the bone, ligaments, cartilage and synovial tissue, which can be observed using radiography, ultrasonography or MRI. Hand OA is a heterogeneous disorder and is considered to be multifactorial in aetiology. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, presentation and burden of hand OA, including an update on hand OA imaging (including the development of novel techniques), disease mechanisms and management. In particular, areas for which new evidence has substantially changed the way we understand, consider and treat hand OA are highlighted. For example, genetic studies, clinical trials and careful prospective imaging studies from the past 5 years are beginning to provide insights into the pathogenesis of hand OA that might uncover new therapeutic targets in disease

    Applications of glycosaminoglycans in the medical, veterinary, pharmaceutical and cosmetic fields

    No full text
    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are complex polysaccharides ubiquitously present in the extracellular matrix of mammalian tissues, where they constitute the gelatinous material responsible of maintaining the cells together, in an intimate association with a variety of proteins. Although their structures are not strictly regular, they are composed of a repeating unit of a hexosamine-containing disaccharide. Most of them possess uronic acid residues and, with the exception of hyaluronic acid, they also carry sulfate groups. As a consequence of their high negative charge, they have an extraordinary capacity to absorb water. GAGs participate in many relevant biological processes by interaction with a plethora of proteins, and thus, a large number of applications in different fields have been conceived for GAGs and their derivatives.Fil: Kovensky, Jose Eduardo. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Centro de Investigaciones en Hidratos de Carbono. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Centro de Investigaciones en Hidratos de Carbono; Argentina. Université de Picardie Jules Verne; Francia. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique; FranciaFil: Grand, Eric. Université de Picardie Jules Verne; Francia. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique; FranciaFil: Uhrig, Maria Laura. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Centro de Investigaciones en Hidratos de Carbono. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Centro de Investigaciones en Hidratos de Carbono; Argentin

    Additive QTLs on three chromosomes control flowering time in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.)

    Get PDF
    Flowering time is an important trait that affects survival, reproduction and yield in both wild and cultivated plants. Therefore, many studies have focused on the identification of flowering time quantitative trait locus (QTLs) in different crops, and molecular control of this trait has been extensively investigated in model species. Here we report the mapping of QTLs for flowering time and vegetative traits in a large woodland strawberry mapping population that was phenotyped both under field conditions and in a greenhouse after flower induction in the field. The greenhouse experiment revealed additive QTLs in three linkage groups (LG), two on both LG4 and LG7, and one on LG6 that explain about half of the flowering time variance in the population. Three of the QTLs were newly identified in this study, and one co-localized with the previously characterized FvTFL1 gene. An additional strong QTL corresponding to previously mapped PFRU was detected in both field and greenhouse experiments indicating that gene(s) in this locus can control the timing of flowering in different environments in addition to the duration of flowering and axillary bud differentiation to runners and branch crowns. Several putative flowering time genes were identified in these QTL regions that await functional validation. Our results indicate that a few major QTLs may control flowering time and axillary bud differentiation in strawberries. We suggest that the identification of causal genes in the diploid strawberry may enable fine tuning of flowering time and vegetative growth in the closely related octoploid cultivated strawberry.Peer reviewe

    Ten principles of heterochromatin formation and function

    Get PDF

    Validation of a Fecal Glucocorticoid Assay to Assess Adrenocortical Activity in Meerkats Using Physiological and Biological Stimuli

    Get PDF
    In mammals, glucocorticoid (i.e. GC) levels have been associated with specific life-history stages and transitions, reproductive strategies, and a plethora of behaviors. Assessment of adrenocortical activity via measurement of glucocorticoid metabolites in feces (FGCM) has greatly facilitated data collection from wild animals, due to its non-invasive nature, and thus has become an established tool in behavioral ecology and conservation biology. The aim of our study was to validate a fecal glucocorticoid assay for assessing adrenocortical activity in meerkats (Suricata suricatta), by comparing the suitability of three GC enzyme immunoassays (corticosterone, 11ő≤-hydroxyetiocholanolone and 11oxo-etiocholanolone) in detecting FGCM increases in adult males and females following a pharmacological challenge with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and biological stimuli. In addition, we investigated the time course characterizing FGCM excretion, the effect of age, sex and time of day on FGCM levels and assessed the potential effects of soil contamination (sand) on FGCM patterns. Our results show that the group specific 11ő≤-hydroxyetiocholanolone assay was most sensitive to FGCM alterations, detecting significant and most distinctive elevations in FGCM levels around 25 h after ACTH administration. We found no age and sex differences in basal FGCM or on peak response levels to ACTH, but a marked diurnal pattern, with FGCM levels being substantially higher in the morning than later during the day. Soil contamination did not significantly affect FGCM patterns. Our results emphasize the importance of conducting assay validations to characterize species-specific endocrine excretion patterns, a crucial step to all animal endocrinology studies using a non-invasive approach.peerReviewe

    ESICM LIVES 2016: part two : Milan, Italy. 1-5 October 2016.

    Get PDF
    Meeting abstrac
    • ‚Ķ
    corecore