26 research outputs found

    Digital compliance: perspectives of key stakeholders : (D3.2.2 & D3.2.3 Analysis of workshops and interviews)

    Get PDF
    Different actors involved in organising agrifood chain transparency hold different views and expectations of farm data sharing and digital compliance in general and AgriPlace in particular. The findings are summarised into Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, and Threat (SWOT) matrices that enable the analysis of agreements and differences among different stakeholders. Reducing administrative burden alone provides limited value for farmers as the key users of the compliance platform. More value creation mechanisms should be explored, for example, by developing tools and methods for analysing compliance data and providing benchmarking information for improving farm performance. At the same time, concerns of privacy and data security should be adequately addressed. As a prototype compliance platform, the business case of Agriplace faces some uncertainties in the current phase of development. Proactive actions are recommended to establish alliance and align with key stakeholders in the value network in seeking collaborative value propositions. In particular, alignments with cooperatives, trade, retail and standards organisations (including compliance scheme owners) on data requirements and with other solution providers on data registration and re-use deserve top priority

    Triple helix networks matching knowledge demand and supply in seven Dutch horticulture Greenport regions

    Get PDF
    This paper investigates the triple helix (industry, knowledge workers and governments) cooperation on knowledge co-production and valorisation for innovation, which took place in seven horticultural regions in the Netherlands. It thus provides more empirical insight into the functioning of this form of cooperation. Based on a secondary multiple case study analysis, this paper sets out to ascertain what enabled triple helix cooperation in the seven regions with respect to the organisation, the formulation and support for goals and action on knowledge co-production and valorisation. The results indicate that in order to stimulate innovation through triple helix cooperation, the different partners fi rst need to build a proper working relationship and a common language. In order to accomplish this, primary aims for innovation should not be formulated too ambitiously (i.e. too far beyond the entrepreneurs’ daily practice, in particular SMEs). Knowledge workers and policy makers often want to stimulate knowledge co-production and valorisation more radically and quickly. Hence, they have to temper their ambitions. Procedures regarding the cooperation should be rather simple and fl exible. Once a steady working relationship and a common language are developed, then the triple helix collaboration can focus on taking the innovation ambition to a higher level in order to realise more valuable change. At first, entrepreneurs have to experience how they can profit from the cooperation and learn to incorporate knowledge co-production and valorisation step-by-step in their business strategy, including fi nancial investments

    Inclusion in responsible innovation: revisiting the desirability of opening up

    Get PDF
    We investigate opening up, a crucial aim of responsible innovation, in the situation of companies initiating sector-wide change in order to take societal responsibility. Two case studies in agriculture were conducted, using a framing perspective that enlightens how issues are (re-)defined and acquire meaning in conversations. For both industry-led innovation initiatives, this showed when and how the initiatives’ issue frames opened up and closed down. The results suggest that the inclusion of a

    Case studies of regional bioeconomy strategies across Europe

    Get PDF
    This report provides a summary of issues raised in four regional case studies of the bioeconomy: Scotland, South-West Netherlands, Saxony-Anhalt and Veneto. It examines the ways in which the bioeconomy has been defined in regional strategies and the ways in which those regional strategies have been initiated and implemented in the four regions

    Blind Spot for Pioneering Farmers? Reflections on Dutch Dairy Sustainability Transition

    No full text
    This study explores the questions of how to govern the transition towards sustainable farming in a responsible and inclusive manner by exploring the Dutch dairy case. Sustainability transition is about fundamental social–technical changes to address the grand challenges that society faces today. It includes breaking down and phasing out unsustainable practice as well as scaling up sustainable alternatives. Transition literature argues that governments should implement a mix of transition tasks to give direction, support the new and destabilase the unsustainable. In addition, market-based instruments (MBIs) and policy interventions rewarding sustainable farming stimulate transition. This study illustrates that strong and prolonged pressure of not meeting international environmental agreements triggered the implementation of stronger policy interventions that destabilize the unsustainable. However, less policy attention seems to be given to supporting the “new”, such as pioneering alternative farmers who develop sustainable alternatives to mainstream farming. To achieve more responsible and inclusive sustainability transitions, it is important to implement tailor-made policies that support pioneering alternative farmers who are already taking steps in developing sustainable farms which, in addition to food, provide ecological and other benefits to community

    Climate-smart policy : The need for a coherent approach at food systems level

    No full text
    corecore