18 research outputs found

    Portal Vein Embolization is Associated with Reduced Liver Failure and Mortality in High-Risk Resections for Perihilar Cholangiocarcinoma

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    Background: Preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) is frequently used to improve future liver remnant volume (FLRV) and to reduce the risk of liver failure after major liver resection. Objective: This paper aimed to assess postoperative outcomes after PVE and resection for suspected perihilar cholangiocarcinoma (PHC) in an international, multicentric cohort. Methods: Patients undergoing resection for suspected PHC across 20 centers worldwide, from the year 2000, were included. Liver failure, biliary leakage, and hemorrhage were classified according to the respective International Study Group of Liver Surgery criteria. Using propensity scoring, two equal cohorts were generated using matching parameters, i.e. age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, jaundice, type of biliary drainage, baseline FLRV, resection type, and portal vein resection. Results: A total of 1667 patients were treated for suspected PHC during the study period. In 298 patients who underwent preoperative PVE, the overall incidence of liver failure and 90-day mortality was 27% and 18%, respectively, as opposed to 14% and 12%, respectively, in patients without PVE (p < 0.001 and p = 0.005). After propensity score matching, 98 patients were enrolled in each cohort, resulting in similar baseline and operative characteristics. Liver failure was lower in the PVE group (8% vs. 36%, p < 0.001), as was biliary leakage (10% vs. 35%, p < 0.01), intra-abdominal abscesses (19% vs. 34%, p = 0.01), and 90-day mortality (7% vs. 18%, p = 0.03). Conclusion: PVE before major liver resection for PHC is associated with a lower incidence of liver failure, biliary leakage, abscess formation, and mortality. These results demonstrate the importance of PVE as an integral component in the surgical treatment of PHC

    Critical care usage after major gastrointestinal and liver surgery: a prospective, multicentre observational study

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    Background Patient selection for critical care admission must balance patient safety with optimal resource allocation. This study aimed to determine the relationship between critical care admission, and postoperative mortality after abdominal surgery. Methods This prespecified secondary analysis of a multicentre, prospective, observational study included consecutive patients enrolled in the DISCOVER study from UK and Republic of Ireland undergoing major gastrointestinal and liver surgery between October and December 2014. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Multivariate logistic regression was used to explore associations between critical care admission (planned and unplanned) and mortality, and inter-centre variation in critical care admission after emergency laparotomy. Results Of 4529 patients included, 37.8% (n=1713) underwent planned critical care admissions from theatre. Some 3.1% (n=86/2816) admitted to ward-level care subsequently underwent unplanned critical care admission. Overall 30-day mortality was 2.9% (n=133/4519), and the risk-adjusted association between 30-day mortality and critical care admission was higher in unplanned [odds ratio (OR): 8.65, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.51–19.97) than planned admissions (OR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.43–3.85). Some 26.7% of patients (n=1210/4529) underwent emergency laparotomies. After adjustment, 49.3% (95% CI: 46.8–51.9%, P<0.001) were predicted to have planned critical care admissions, with 7% (n=10/145) of centres outside the 95% CI. Conclusions After risk adjustment, no 30-day survival benefit was identified for either planned or unplanned postoperative admissions to critical care within this cohort. This likely represents appropriate admission of the highest-risk patients. Planned admissions in selected, intermediate-risk patients may present a strategy to mitigate the risk of unplanned admission. Substantial inter-centre variation exists in planned critical care admissions after emergency laparotomies

    Cetuximab therapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: The future frontier?

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    AbstractBackgroundTo review the outcomes following cetuximab therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.MethodsRelevant articles were reviewed from the published literature using the Medline database. The search was performed using the keywords “colorectal cancer”, “cetuximab”, “liver metastases”, “liver resection” and “hepatectomy”.ResultsCetuximab was first used in the palliative setting and an increase in response rates were seen, however with no improvement in overall survival. Published data have observed that cetuximab may be beneficial as part of a down-staging programme. The addition of cetuximab to chemotherapy regimens in patients with KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer has been shown to increase the response rates and the number of patients being down-staged and offered potentially curative resection. The OPUS and CRYSTAL trials observed good response rates following the addition of cetuximab but low resection rates. The CELIM and POCHER studies reported higher resection rates due to better patient selection and study design. However, the majority of published studies tend to report minimal surgical data and lack short- and long-term outcomes.ConclusionThe use of cetuximab to conventional chemotherapy regimens may improve the efficacy of down-staging programmes, leading to more patients being offered potentially curative resection

    Surgeon's awareness of the synchronous liver metastases during colorectal cancer resection may affect outcome

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    Aim: there is conflicting evidence about the importance of synchronous metastases upon tumor outcome. The aim of this study is to identify the effect of finding synchronous colorectal liver metastases on the performance of the surgeon whilst operating on primary colorectal cancer.Methods: patients with completed colorectal cancer data who underwent liver resection for colorectal metastases between 1993 and 2001 were included. Two hundred seventy patients were categorised according to the site of the primary tumour (colon or rectum) and knowledge of the presence of liver metastases by the colorectal surgeon (SA = surgeon aware, n = 112, SNA = surgeon not aware, n = 158). The number of retrieved lymph nodes and colorectal resection margin involvement were used as surgical performance indicators. Survival and local recurrence rate were monitored.Results: the SA group had a higher rate of colorectal circumferential resection margin involvement, the local and intra-abdominal recurrence rate was also significantly higher in this group (p &lt; 0.001).Conclusions: awareness of the presence of liver metastases by the operating surgeon is an independent predictor of intra abdominal extra hepatic recurrence of colorectal cancer following potentially curative hepatic resection. This is related to an increased rate of primary colorectal resection margin involvemen

    Critical care usage after major gastrointestinal and liver surgery: a prospective, multicentre observational study

    No full text
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