42 research outputs found

    A simple to implement and low-cost supervised walking programme in highly motivated individuals with or at risk for type 2 diabetes : An observational study with a pre-post design

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    This observational study with a pre-post design, conducted in two Dutch primary healthcare centres, aimed to evaluate the effect of a supervised walking programme in highly motivated individuals with or at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Those able and willing to walk at least 6 km, were invited for a 28-week walking programme (February to August 2017), in which participants walked in groups, once weekly under supervision of volunteer healthcare professionals. Changes in bodyweight, BMI, waist circumference, HbA1c, blood pressure, well-being, health status and patient activation were analysed using paired t-tests and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Fifty-six people were included (30 T2DM; 26 at risk), of whom 60.7% were female. Mean age was 60.6 years, median BMI 30.8 kg/m2 and mean systolic blood pressure 146.9 mm Hg. Participants with T2DM had median HbA1c of 50.0 mmol/mol. Post-challenge, BMI had decreased to 29.7 kg/m2, and waist circumference decreased 3.4 cm (95% CI 2.1–4.8), both p 53 mmol/mol at baseline (n = 8), had median decrease in HbA1c of 6.5 mmol/mol (p = 0.03). Well-being, but not health status and patient activation, improved significantly. In conclusion, in highly motivated individuals with or at risk for T2DM, this simple to implement and low-cost, but intensive, volunteer-based supervised walking programme is favourable, and therefore, can be seen as an option for clinical programs to implement to support highly motivated patients

    The effectiveness of an emotion-focused educational programme in reducing diabetes distress in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus at 12-month follow-up : a cluster randomized controlled trial

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    Background: Diabetes distress (DD) is an increasingly important part of clinical medicine, diabetes self-management and research topic in people with diabetes mellitus. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a value-based emotion-focused educational program in Malay adults with type 2 diabetes (VEMOFIT) at 12-month follow-up compared with a program with systematic attention to participants’ emotions (attention-control). Methods: VEMOFIT consisted of four biweekly group sessions and a booster session after 3 months; the attention-control program consisted of three sessions over the same period. Intention-to-treat analysis with multilevel mixed modelling was done to estimate the intervention effect. Results: Participants (n = 124) randomized to VEMOFIT (n = 53) or attention-control (n = 71). Mean (SD) age 55.7 (9.7) years, median diabetes duration 7.0 (8.0) years and mean HbA1c level 9.7% (82 mmol/mol). The mean DD (DDS-17 scale) level decreased in both groups (from 3.4 to 3.3 versus 3.1–2.5, respectively), significantly more in the attention-control group [adjusted difference −0.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) −1.1, −0.2]. The VEMOFIT group had a significant improvement in self-efficacy (DMSES, range 0–200; adjusted difference 16.4, 99.4% CI 1.9, 30.9). Other outcomes did not differ. Conclusions: Because the attention-control program resulted in a decreased DD 1 year later, its implementation on a larger scale seems justified. Trial registration: NCT02730078; NMRR-15-1144-24803

    Effectiveness of diabetes self-management education and support via a smartphone application in insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes : Results of a randomized controlled trial (TRIGGER study)

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    Objective: To investigate the effect of diabetes self-management education and support via a smartphone app in individuals with type 2 diabetes on insulin therapy. Research design and methods: Open two-arm multicenter parallel randomized controlled superiority trial. The intervention group (n=115) received theory and evidence-based self-management education and support via a smartphone app (optionally two or six times per week, once daily at different times). The control group (n=115) received care as usual. Primary outcome: HbA1c at 6 months. Other outcomes included HbA1c ≤53 mmol/mol (≤7%) without any hypoglycemic event, body mass index, glycemic variability, dietary habits and quality of life. We performed multiple imputation and regression models adjusted for baseline value, age, sex, diabetes duration and insulin dose. Results: Sixty-six general practices and five hospital outpatient clinics recruited 230 participants. Baseline HbA1c was comparable between groups (8.1% and 8.3%, respectively). At 6 months, the HbA1c was 63.8 mmol/mol (8.0%) in the intervention vs 66.2 mmol/mol (8.2%) in the control group; adjusted difference -0.93 mmol/mol (-0.08%), 95% CI -4.02 to 2.17 mmol/mol (-0.37% to 0.20%), p=0.557. The odds for achieving an HbA1c level ≤7% without any hypoglycemic event was lower in the intervention group: OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.33 to 2.35. There was no effect on secondary outcomes. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions: This smartphone app providing diabetes self-management education and support had small and clinically not relevant effects. Apps should be more personalized and target individuals who think the app will be useful for them

    A simple to implement and low-cost supervised walking programme in highly motivated individuals with or at risk for type 2 diabetes : An observational study with a pre-post design

    No full text
    This observational study with a pre-post design, conducted in two Dutch primary healthcare centres, aimed to evaluate the effect of a supervised walking programme in highly motivated individuals with or at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Those able and willing to walk at least 6 km, were invited for a 28-week walking programme (February to August 2017), in which participants walked in groups, once weekly under supervision of volunteer healthcare professionals. Changes in bodyweight, BMI, waist circumference, HbA1c, blood pressure, well-being, health status and patient activation were analysed using paired t-tests and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Fifty-six people were included (30 T2DM; 26 at risk), of whom 60.7% were female. Mean age was 60.6 years, median BMI 30.8 kg/m2 and mean systolic blood pressure 146.9 mm Hg. Participants with T2DM had median HbA1c of 50.0 mmol/mol. Post-challenge, BMI had decreased to 29.7 kg/m2, and waist circumference decreased 3.4 cm (95% CI 2.1–4.8), both p 53 mmol/mol at baseline (n = 8), had median decrease in HbA1c of 6.5 mmol/mol (p = 0.03). Well-being, but not health status and patient activation, improved significantly. In conclusion, in highly motivated individuals with or at risk for T2DM, this simple to implement and low-cost, but intensive, volunteer-based supervised walking programme is favourable, and therefore, can be seen as an option for clinical programs to implement to support highly motivated patients

    Patient activation in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus : Associated factors and the role of insulin

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    Aim: This study explored the relationship between insulin use and patient activation (a person’s internal readiness and capabilities to undertake health-promoting actions) in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus and aimed to identify demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors involved in patient activation. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, baseline data from a Dutch nationwide study were analyzed. Patient activation was assessed with the Patient Activation Measure 13. A linear mixed model was used to take clustering into account. Results: In total, 1,189 persons were included (310 of whom were on insulin), enrolled via 47 general practices and six hospitals. Their mean Patient Activation Measure 13 score was 59±12. We found no association between insulin therapy and patient activation. In the multivariable analysis, individuals with a better health status, very good or very poor social support (vs good social support), individuals who felt they had greater control over their illness and those with a better subjective understanding of their illness showed higher patient activation. Individuals with a lower educational level and those who expected their illness to continue showed a lower activation level. Conclusion: Patient activation does not differ between individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus on insulin therapy and those on other therapies

    People with type 2 diabetes and screen-detected cognitive impairment use acute health care services more often : Observations from the COG-ID study

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    Background: Patients with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of cognitive impairment which can lead to impaired diabetes self-management and an increased risk of diabetes-related complications. Routine screening for cognitive impairment in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes is therefore increasingly advocated. The aim of this study is to investigate whether people with type 2 diabetes and screen-detected cognitive impairment use acute health care services more often than patients not suspected of cognitive impairment. Methods: People with type 2 diabetes ≥ 70 years were screened for cognitive impairment in primary care. Diagnoses in screen positives were established at a memory clinic. Information about acute health care use was collected for 2 years prior to and 2 years after screening and compared to screen negatives. Results: 154 participants (38% female, mean age 76.7 ± 5.2 years, diabetes duration 8.7 ± 8.2 years) were included, 37 patients with cognitive impairment, 117 screen negatives. A higher percentage of participants with cognitive impairment compared to screen negative patients used acute health care services; this difference was significant for general practitioner's out of hours services (56% versus 34% used this service over 4 years, p = 0.02). The mean number of acute health care visits was also higher in those with cognitive impairment than in screen negatives (2.2 ± 2.8 versus 1.4 ± 2.2 visits in 4 years, p < 0.05; 1.4 ± 2.2 versus 0.7 ± 1.5 visits in 2 years after screening, p = 0.03). Factors that could have played a role in this increased risk of acute health care services use were a low educational level, the presence of depressive symptoms (CES-D score ≥ 16), self-reported problems in self-care and self-reported problems in usual activities. Conclusions: People with type 2 diabetes and screen-detected cognitive impairment use acute health care services more often

    Association between person and disease related factors and the planned diabetes care in people who receive person-centered type 2 diabetes care : An implementation study

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    AIMS: To assess the planned diabetes care for the coming year and its associated factors in patients with Type 2 diabetes who have a person-centered annual consultation. METHODS: Implementation study of a new consultation model in 47 general practices (primary care) and 6 outpatient clinics (secondary care); 1200 patients from primary and 166 from secondary care participated. Data collection took place between November 2015 and February 2017. Outcomes: preferred monitoring frequency; referral to other health care provider(s); medication change. One measurement at the end of the consultation. We performed logistic regression analyses. Differences between primary and secondary care were analyzed. RESULTS: Many patients arranged a monitoring frequency <4 times per year (general practices 19.5%, outpatient clinics 40%, p < .001). Type of provider (physician/nurse, OR 3.83, p < .001), baseline HbA1c (OR 1.02, p = .017), glucose lowering medication; and setting treatment goals (OR .65, p = .048) were associated with the chosen frequency. Independently associated with a referral were age (OR .99, p = .039), baseline glucose lowering medication and patients' goal setting (OR 1.52, p = .016). Medication change was associated with type of provider, baseline HbA1c, blood glucose lowering medication, quality of life (OR .80, p = .037) and setting treatment goals (OR 2.64, p = .001). CONCLUSIONS: Not only disease but also person related factors, especially setting treatment goals, are independently associated with planned care use in person-centered diabetes care

    Cluster randomised trial on the effectiveness of a computerised prompt to refer (back) patients with type 2 diabetes

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    Aims Information and communications technology (ICT) could support care organisations to cope with the increasing number of patients with diabetes mellitus. We aimed to aid diabetes care providers in allocating patients to the preferred treatment setting (hospital outpatient clinic or primary care practice), by using the Electronic Medical Record (EMR). Methods A cluster randomised controlled trial. Physicians in primary and secondary care practices of the intervention group received an advisory message in the EMR during diabetes consultations if patients were treated in the ‘incorrect’ setting according to national management guidelines. Primary outcome: the proportion of patients that shifted to the correct treatment setting at one year follow-up. Results 47 (38 primary care and 9 internist) practices and 2778 patients were included. At baseline, 1197 (43.1%) patients were in the correct treatment setting (intervention 599; control 598). Advice most often (68.4%) regarded a consultation with the internist. After one year 12.4% of the patients in the intervention and 10.6% in the control group (p = 0.30) had shifted to the correct setting. Main reasons for not following advice were: 1. physician’s preference to consider other treatment options; 2. patients’ preferences. Conclusions We could not find evidence that using the EMR to send consultation-linked advice to physicians resulted in a shift in patients. Physicians will not follow the advice, at least partly due to patients’ preferences

    Diabetes care providers' opinions and working methods after four years of experience with a diabetes patient web portal; A survey among health care providers in general practices and an outpatient clinic

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    Background: To gain insight into the opinions and working methods of diabetes care providers after using a diabetes web portal for 4 years in order to understand the role of the provider in patients' web portal use. Methods: Survey among physicians and nurses from general practices and an outpatient clinic, correlated with data from the common web portal. Results: One hundred twenty-eight questionnaires were analysed (response rate 56.6%). Responders' mean age was 46.2 ± 9.8 years and 43.8% were physicians. The majority was of opinion that the portal improves patients' diabetes knowledge (90.6%) and quality of care (72.7%). Although uploading glucose diary (93.6%) and patient access to laboratory and clinical notes (91.2 and 71.0%) were considered important, these features were recommended to patients in only 71.8 and 19.5% respectively. 64.8% declared they informed their patients about the portal and 45.3% handed-out the information leaflet and website address. The portal was especially recommended to type 1 diabetes patients (78.3%); those on insulin (84.3%) and patients aged< 65 years (72.4%). Few found it timesaving (21.9%). Diabetes care providers' opinions were not associated with patients' portal use. Conclusions: Providers are positive about patients web portals but still not recommend or encourage the use to all patients. There seems room for improvement in their working methods

    Person-centred type 2 diabetes care : Time for a paradigm shift

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