3,453 research outputs found

    Design and Simulation of a Transmon Qubit Chip for Axion Detection

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    Quantum Sensing is a rapidly expanding research field that finds one of its applications in Fundamental Physics, as the search for Dark Matter. Devices based on superconducting qubits have already been successfully applied in detecting few-GHz single photons via Quantum Non-Demolition measurement (QND). This technique allows us to perform repeatable measurements, bringing remarkable sensitivity improvements and dark count rate suppression in experiments based on high-precision microwave photon detection, such as for Axions and Dark Photons search. In this context, the INFN Qub-IT project goal is to realize an itinerant single-photon counter based on superconducting qubits that will exploit QND for enhancing Axion search experiments. In this study, we present Qub-IT's status towards the realization of its first superconducting qubit device, illustrating design and simulation procedures and the characterization of fabricated Coplanar Waveguide Resonators (CPWs) for readout. We match target qubit parameters and assess a few-percent level agreement between lumped and distributed element simulation models. We reach a maximum internal quality factor of 9.2×105 for -92 dBm on-chip readout power

    GWTC-2.1: Deep extended catalog of compact binary coalescences observed by LIGO and Virgo during the first half of the third observing run

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    International audienceThe second Gravitational-Wave Transient Catalog, GWTC-2, reported on 39 compact binary coalescences observed by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors between 1 April 2019 15∶00 UTC and 1 October 2019 15∶00 UTC. Here, we present GWTC-2.1, which reports on a deeper list of candidate events observed over the same period. We analyze the final version of the strain data over this period with improved calibration and better subtraction of excess noise, which has been publicly released. We employ three matched-filter search pipelines for candidate identification, and estimate the probability of astrophysical origin for each candidate event. While GWTC-2 used a false alarm rate threshold of 2 per year, we include in GWTC-2.1, 1201 candidates that pass a false alarm rate threshold of 2 per day. We calculate the source properties of a subset of 44 high-significance candidates that have a probability of astrophysical origin greater than 0.5. Of these candidates, 36 have been reported in GWTC-2. We also calculate updated source properties for all binary black hole events previously reported in GWTC-1. If the eight additional high-significance candidates presented here are astrophysical, the mass range of events that are unambiguously identified as binary black holes (both objects ≄3M⊙) is increased compared to GWTC-2, with total masses from ∌14M⊙ for GW190924_021846 to ∌182M⊙ for GW190426_190642. Source properties calculated using our default prior suggest that the primary components of two new candidate events (GW190403_051519 and GW190426_190642) fall in the mass gap predicted by pair-instability supernova theory. We also expand the population of binaries with significantly asymmetric mass ratios reported in GWTC-2 by an additional two events (the mass ratio is less than 0.65 and 0.44 at 90% probability for GW190403_051519 and GW190917_114630 respectively), and find that two of the eight new events have effective inspiral spins χeff>0 (at 90% credibility), while no binary is consistent with χeff<0 at the same significance. We provide updated estimates for rates of binary black hole and binary neutron star coalescence in the local Universe

    GWTC-2.1: Deep extended catalog of compact binary coalescences observed by LIGO and Virgo during the first half of the third observing run

    No full text
    International audienceThe second Gravitational-Wave Transient Catalog, GWTC-2, reported on 39 compact binary coalescences observed by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors between 1 April 2019 15∶00 UTC and 1 October 2019 15∶00 UTC. Here, we present GWTC-2.1, which reports on a deeper list of candidate events observed over the same period. We analyze the final version of the strain data over this period with improved calibration and better subtraction of excess noise, which has been publicly released. We employ three matched-filter search pipelines for candidate identification, and estimate the probability of astrophysical origin for each candidate event. While GWTC-2 used a false alarm rate threshold of 2 per year, we include in GWTC-2.1, 1201 candidates that pass a false alarm rate threshold of 2 per day. We calculate the source properties of a subset of 44 high-significance candidates that have a probability of astrophysical origin greater than 0.5. Of these candidates, 36 have been reported in GWTC-2. We also calculate updated source properties for all binary black hole events previously reported in GWTC-1. If the eight additional high-significance candidates presented here are astrophysical, the mass range of events that are unambiguously identified as binary black holes (both objects ≄3M⊙) is increased compared to GWTC-2, with total masses from ∌14M⊙ for GW190924_021846 to ∌182M⊙ for GW190426_190642. Source properties calculated using our default prior suggest that the primary components of two new candidate events (GW190403_051519 and GW190426_190642) fall in the mass gap predicted by pair-instability supernova theory. We also expand the population of binaries with significantly asymmetric mass ratios reported in GWTC-2 by an additional two events (the mass ratio is less than 0.65 and 0.44 at 90% probability for GW190403_051519 and GW190917_114630 respectively), and find that two of the eight new events have effective inspiral spins χeff>0 (at 90% credibility), while no binary is consistent with χeff<0 at the same significance. We provide updated estimates for rates of binary black hole and binary neutron star coalescence in the local Universe

    Search for Eccentric Black Hole Coalescences during the Third Observing Run of LIGO and Virgo