1,180 research outputs found

    "...And all the men knew the colors of the sea..." : historical and archaeological investigation of the SS Commodore, Ponce Inlet, Florida

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    This study focuses on a single question: Are the wreck site remains held under joint title by the Ponce Inlet Lighthouse Association and Norman Serbousek those of the SS Commodore, sunk on January 1, 1897? The answer to this question lies in the documentation, survey, and historical study of a shipwreck lying twelve miles off Daytona Beach, Florida, in seventy feet of seawater. The remains at the site represent a significant late nineteenth century wooden-hulled steam vessel located in a dynamic marine environment off Ponce Inlet, Florida. The research presented here stems from the hypothesis that the vessel's identity can be determined by an examination of the historical and archaeological records. Discovered in 1985 by Norman (Don) Serbousek, the vessel remains are primarily sitting on a sand and shell hash bottom. The engine, shaft, propeller, donkey boiler, small anchor, and windlass are the dominant site features. Buried under a thin layer of sediment are at least two cases of bullets, large pieces of boilerplate, and some hull structure. Serbousek and the Anchor Chasers Dive Club recovered over 180 artifacts in the 1980s and early 1990s. The collection contains rifles, bullets, coal, ceramics, and steam machinery. It is housed at Ponce Inlet Lighthouse, where it awaits conservation. Research was facilitated by the existence of extensive archival materials, a relatively "untouched" archaeological wreck site, and the ability to examine previously recovered artifacts. Each of the sources above were examined to test Ponce Inlet Lighthouse Association's (PILHA) and Serbousek's assertions that the wreckage is that of the SS Commodore. Underwater investigations of the site were made using standard archaeological practices. The site was mapped to scale, and a video documentary record made of the site. All previously recovered artifacts were examined, identified, drawn, photographed, tagged, and assessed for future conservation. Documents from a variety of sources were studied and used in testing the site's identity. The incorporation of data from all three sources, the site, the artifacts, and the documents lead the author to conclude that the wreck lying twelve miles from Daytona Beach, Florida, represents the remains of SS Commodore

    The Human Affectome

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    Over the last decades, the interdisciplinary field of the affective sciences has seen proliferation rather than integration of theoretical perspectives. This is due to differences in metaphysical and mechanistic assumptions about human affective phenomena (what they are and how they work) which, shaped by academic motivations and values, have determined the affective constructs and operationalizations. An assumption on the purpose of affective phenomena can be used as a teleological principle to guide the construction of a common set of metaphysical and mechanistic assumptions—a framework for human affective research. In this capstone paper for the special issue “Towards an Integrated Understanding of the Human Affectome”, we gather the tiered purpose of human affective phenomena to synthesize assumptions that account for human affective phenomena collectively. This teleologically-grounded framework offers a principled agenda and launchpad for both organizing existing perspectives and generating new ones. Ultimately, we hope Human Affectome brings us a step closer to not only an integrated understanding of human affective phenomena, but an integrated field for affective research

    The Human Affectome

    No full text
    Over the last decades, the interdisciplinary field of the affective sciences has seen proliferation rather than integration of theoretical perspectives. This is due to differences in metaphysical and mechanistic assumptions about human affective phenomena (what they are and how they work) which, shaped by academic motivations and values, have determined the affective constructs and operationalizations. An assumption on the purpose of affective phenomena can be used as a teleological principle to guide the construction of a common set of metaphysical and mechanistic assumptions—a framework for human affective research. In this capstone paper for the special issue “Towards an Integrated Understanding of the Human Affectome”, we gather the tiered purpose of human affective phenomena to synthesize assumptions that account for human affective phenomena collectively. This teleologically-grounded framework offers a principled agenda and launchpad for both organizing existing perspectives and generating new ones. Ultimately, we hope Human Affectome brings us a step closer to not only an integrated understanding of human affective phenomena, but an integrated field for affective research

    Project #65: Reducing Door to Balloon Time in STEMI: Celebrating the EMS, ED and Cardiology QI Collaboration

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    Project Aim: To employ a multidisciplinary approach, engaging local emergency medical services (EMS), emergency department (ED), and cardiology teams to assure that STEMI patients in our community receive prompt, equitable, consistent, safe, and high-quality revascularization of their coronary arteries; and to deploy a variety of educational, operational and feedback tools to initiatve early prehospital EKG transmission and Cath lab activation for patients in our community suffering from ST segment elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI).https://scholarlycommons.henryford.com/qualityexpo2023/1002/thumbnail.jp

    Predictors of Cognitive Change in Parkinson Disease: A 2-year Follow-up Study

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    BACKGROUND: Mild cognitive impairment is common in Parkinson disease (PD-MCI). However, instability in this clinical diagnosis and variability in rates of progression to dementia raises questions regarding its utility for longitudinal tracking and prediction of cognitive change in PD. We examined baseline neuropsychological test and cognitive diagnosis predictors of cognitive change in PD. METHODS: Persons with PD, without dementia PD (N=138) underwent comprehensive neuropsychological assessment at baseline and were followed up to 2 years. Level II Movement Disorder Society criteria for PD-MCI and PD dementia (PDD) were applied annually. Composite global and domain cognitive z -scores were calculated based on a 10-test neuropsychological battery. RESULTS: Baseline diagnosis of PD-MCI was not associated with a change in global cognitive z -scores. Lower baseline attention and higher executive domain z -scores were associated with greater global cognitive z -score worsening regardless of cognitive diagnosis. Worse baseline domain z -scores in the attention and language domains were associated with progression to MCI or PDD, whereas higher baseline scores in all cognitive domains except executive function were associated with clinical and psychometric reversion to normal cognition. CONCLUSIONS: Lower scores on cognitive tests of attention were predictive of worse global cognition over 2 years of follow-up in PD, and lower baseline attention and language scores were associated with progression to MCI or PDD. However, PD-MCI diagnosis per se was not predictive of cognitive decline over 2 years. The association between higher executive domain z -scores and greater global cognitive worsening is probably a spurious result
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