1,224 research outputs found

    The LHCb upgrade I

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    International audienceThe LHCb upgrade represents a major change of the experiment. The detectors have been almost completely renewed to allow running at an instantaneous luminosity five times larger than that of the previous running periods. Readout of all detectors into an all-software trigger is central to the new design, facilitating the reconstruction of events at the maximum LHC interaction rate, and their selection in real time. The experiment's tracking system has been completely upgraded with a new pixel vertex detector, a silicon tracker upstream of the dipole magnet and three scintillating fibre tracking stations downstream of the magnet. The whole photon detection system of the RICH detectors has been renewed and the readout electronics of the calorimeter and muon systems have been fully overhauled. The first stage of the all-software trigger is implemented on a GPU farm. The output of the trigger provides a combination of totally reconstructed physics objects, such as tracks and vertices, ready for final analysis, and of entire events which need further offline reprocessing. This scheme required a complete revision of the computing model and rewriting of the experiment's software

    Estimating the coincidence rate between the optical and radio array of IceCube-Gen2

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    The IceCube-Gen2 Neutrino Observatory is proposed to extend the all-flavour energy range of IceCube beyond PeV energies. It will comprise two key components: I) An enlarged 8km3 in-ice optical Cherenkov array to measure the continuation of the IceCube astrophysical neutrino flux and improve IceCube\u27s point source sensitivity above ∌100TeV; and II) A very large in-ice radio array with a surface area of about 500km2. Radio waves propagate through ice with a kilometer-long attenuation length, hence a sparse radio array allows us to instrument a huge volume of ice to achieve a sufficient sensitivity to detect neutrinos with energies above tens of PeV. The different signal topologies for neutrino-induced events measured by the optical and in-ice radio detector - the radio detector is mostly sensitive to the cascades produced in the neutrino interaction, while the optical detector can detect long-ranging muon and tau leptons with high accuracy - yield highly complementary information. When detected in coincidence, these signals will allow us to reconstruct the neutrino energy and arrival direction with high fidelity. Furthermore, if events are detected in coincidence with a sufficient rate, they resemble the unique opportunity to study systematic uncertainties and to cross-calibrate both detector components

    The LHCb upgrade I

    No full text
    International audienceThe LHCb upgrade represents a major change of the experiment. The detectors have been almost completely renewed to allow running at an instantaneous luminosity five times larger than that of the previous running periods. Readout of all detectors into an all-software trigger is central to the new design, facilitating the reconstruction of events at the maximum LHC interaction rate, and their selection in real time. The experiment's tracking system has been completely upgraded with a new pixel vertex detector, a silicon tracker upstream of the dipole magnet and three scintillating fibre tracking stations downstream of the magnet. The whole photon detection system of the RICH detectors has been renewed and the readout electronics of the calorimeter and muon systems have been fully overhauled. The first stage of the all-software trigger is implemented on a GPU farm. The output of the trigger provides a combination of totally reconstructed physics objects, such as tracks and vertices, ready for final analysis, and of entire events which need further offline reprocessing. This scheme required a complete revision of the computing model and rewriting of the experiment's software

    Sensitivity of the IceCube-Gen2 Surface Array for Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy Studies

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    The energy of the transition from Galactic to extra-galactic origin of cosmic rays is one of the major unresolved issues of cosmic-ray physics. However, strong constraints can be obtained from studying the anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays. The sensitivity to cosmic-ray anisotropy is, in particular, a matter of statistics. Recently, the cosmic ray anisotropy measurements in the TeV to PeV energy range were updated from IceCube using 11 years of data. The IceCube-Gen2 surface array will cover an area about 8 times larger than the existing IceTop surface array with a corresponding increase in statistics and capability to investigate cosmic-ray anisotropy with higher sensitivity. In this contribution, we present details on the performed simulation studies and sensitivity to the cosmic-ray anisotropy signal for the IceCube-Gen2 surface array

    The LHCb upgrade I