87 research outputs found

    Delay in Childbearing and the Evolution of Fertility Rates

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    We present a growth model whose novelty is to explicitly account for the direct, preference-related factors that reinforce the delay in the timing of childbearing. Given  the  strength  of  these  factors,  the  model  generates  the  empirically observed dynamics in completed cohort fertility. Furthermore, the quantitative analysis of our results verifies that our model provides a good fit for actual data of the rebound of the completed cohort fertility rates in Nordic countries. The fact that these countries are widely considered as the most progressive ones, in terms of their cultural norms and in terms of their family-oriented policies, offers credence to the hypothesis that our model advances. More generally, our framework  provides  a  platform  for  research  that  can  uncover  empirically relevant, but yet unexplored, mechanisms in the joint analysis of demographic change and economic growth.</p

    Cultural Persistence in Corruption, Economic Growth, and the Environment

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    Evidence that attributes current environmental outcomes to historical and cultural origins has gained momentum in recent years. In this study, I construct a model to demonstrate why the relation between economic growth and environmental quality hinges on the deeply rooted cultural traits that govern attitudes towards corruption. Specifically, I show that the cultural transmission of the traits that determine the corruptibility of public officials, who are entrusted with the inspection and reporting of firms’ emissions, leads to history-dependant outcomes. It sets in motion either a vicious circle of corruption, high pollution and low economic growth, or a virtuous circle where corruption does not infringe environmental policy, pollution is lower and economic growth is higher. These outcomes have major policy implications. </p

    The 6G Architecture Landscape:European Perspective

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    Efficient Online Scheduling of Electric Vehicle Charging Using a Service-Price Menu

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    Along with high penetration of Electric Vehicles (EVs), charging stations are required to service a large amount of charging requests while accounting for constraints on the station's peak electricity consumption. To this end, a charging station needs to make online charging scheduling decisions often under limited future information. An important challenge relates to the prioritization of EVs that have unknown valuations for different levels of charging services. In this paper, we take into consideration the inability of EV users to express these valuations explicitly. We consider a paradigm where a menu of possible charging schedules and corresponding prices is generated online. By letting the EV users pick their most preferable menu option, the proposed algorithm commits on each EV's charging completion time upon its arrival, achieves a near optimal total weighted charging completion time, and prevents the users from strategically misreporting their preferences, while offering a practical and implementable solution to the problem of EVs - charging station interaction

    Upstream Intergenerational Transfers in Economic Development: The Role of Family Ties and their Cultural Transmission

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    I construct a model where upstream income transfers, from adult children to their old parents, are driven by a culture of strong family ties. This evolves endogenously, through a process of intergenerational cultural transmission. The two-way causal link between economic and cultural change can be a strong enough force to offset cultural substitution, thus generating path-dependent outcomes. These outcomes show that economic development is negatively related with upstream intergenerational transfers, and with the strength of family ties. On the one hand, the economy may follow a convergence path towards a low level of economic development, where adherence to strong family ties is the dominant characteristic of a culturally homogeneous population, and where the overall flow of intergenerational transfers is substantial. On the other hand, the economy may follow a different path of convergence towards a relatively higher level of economic development, where the population is more diverse in terms of their attitudes on family ties, and where the overall flow of intergenerational transfers is lower by comparison

    Cultural Transmission, Education-Promoting Attitudes, and Economic Development

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    This study emphasises the interdependence between physical capital formation and the cultural transmission of human capital-promoting attitudes and values. It demonstrates how this interdependence establishes a powerful propagation mechanism that generates multiple, divergent paths of economic development. It also highlights the role of physical capital formation in expanding the conditions that are propitious to path-dependency in models of cultural transmission: Even in the absence of a cultural complementarity, the long-run equilibrium is sensitive to the initial distribution of cultural attitudes among the population, as long as the combined effects of physical capital formation and social segregation permeate the process of cultural transmission.</p

    Corruption and the Cultural Evolution of Family Ties

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    We study the relation between conjugal family ties and corruption, as well as the important role of this relation for the cultural transmission of preferences regarding the strength of family ties. We show that the impact of family ties on the level of corruption, which can be either positive or negative, feeds back into the very process through which preferences for family ties are diffused from the older to the younger generations. As a result, the relation between family ties and corruption sets in motion mechanisms that govern the dynamics of cultural transmission. These dynamics determine long-term outcomes in terms of the population’s cultural homogeneity or diversity with regard to their attitudes towards family ties

    Upward-Flowing Intergenerational Transfers in Economic Development: The Role of Family Ties and their Cultural Transmission

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    I construct a model where upward-flowing income transfers, from adult children to their old parents, are driven by a culture of strong family ties. This evolves intergenerationally, through a process of cultural transmission. The two-way causal link between economic and cultural change can be a strong enough force to offset cultural substitution, thus generating path-dependent outcomes. These outcomes are consistent with empirical evidence showing that economic development is negatively related with upward-flowing intergenerational transfers, and with the strength of family ties. On the one hand, the economy may follow a convergence path towards a low level of economic development, where adherence to strong family ties is the dominant characteristic of a culturally homogeneous population, and where the overall flow of intergenerational transfers is substantial. On the other hand, the economy may follow a different path of convergence towards a relatively higher level of economic development, where the population is more diverse in terms of their attitudes on family ties, and where the overall flow of intergenerational transfers is lower by comparison

    Family Ties and Corruption

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    We study the relation between conjugal family ties and corruption. Our theoretical model shows that the population share of people who have a desire to retain close ties with their families (i.e., the extensive margin) has an ambiguous effect on the level of corruption, due to the presence of conflicting mechanisms. However, the strength of this desire among people who want to retain close ties with their families (i.e., the intensive margin) has an unambiguously negative effect on corruption. The latter outcome finds support from our empirical analysis: Using micro-level data, we show that, in contrast to conventional wisdom and cross-country reflections, stronger family ties are negatively correlated with a broad set of activities that measure corruption
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