1,222 research outputs found

    Promoting students’ interest through culturally sensitive curricula in higher education

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    Previous studies have emphasized culturally sensitive curricula in the context of enhancing minoritized students’ education. We examined the relationship between second-year higher education students’ perceptions of the cultural sensitivity of their curriculum and both majoritized and minoritized students’ interest in their course. A total of 286 (228 F) students rated the cultural sensitivity of their curriculum on six scales using a revised version of the Culturally Sensitive Curricula Scales (CSCS-R), the perceived quality of their relationships with teachers, and their interest. The CSCS-R widened the construct with two new scales and showed better reliability. Ethnic minority students (n = 99) perceived their curriculum as less culturally sensitive than White students (n = 182), corroborating previous findings. Black students perceived their curriculum as less culturally sensitive than Asian students. There were no significant differences between ethnic minority and White students on interest or perceived quality of relationships with teachers. Five dimensions of cultural sensitivity (Diversity Represented, Positive Depictions, Challenge Power, Inclusive Classroom Interactions, Culturally Sensitive Assessments) and perceived quality of relationships with teachers predicted interest. Ethnicity did not. Ensuring curricula and assessments represent diversity positively, challenge power and are inclusive may support students’ interest while reflecting an increasingly diverse society

    bii4africa dataset

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    The bii4africa dataset is presented in a multi-spreadsheet .xlsx file. The raw data spreadsheet (‘Scores_Raw’) includes 31,313 individual expert estimates of the impact of a sub-Saharan African land use on a species response group of terrestrial vertebrates or vascular plants. Estimates are reported as intactness scores - the remaining proportion of an ‘intact’ reference (pre-industrial or contemporary wilderness area) population of a species response group in a land use, on a scale from 0 (no individuals remain) through 0.5 (half the individuals remain), to 1 (same as the reference population) and, in limited cases, to 2 (two or more times the reference population). For species that thrive in human-modified landscapes, scores could be greater than 1 but not exceeding 2 to avoid extremely large scores biasing aggregation exercises. Expert comments are included alongside respective estimates

    Promoting students’ interest through culturally sensitive curricula in higher education

    Get PDF
    Previous studies have emphasized culturally sensitive curricula in the context of enhancing minoritized students’ education. We examined the relationship between second-year higher education students’ perceptions of the cultural sensitivity of their curriculum and both majoritized and minoritized students’ interest in their course. A total of 286 (228 F) students rated the cultural sensitivity of their curriculum on six scales using a revised version of the Culturally Sensitive Curricula Scales (CSCS-R), the perceived quality of their relationships with teachers, and their interest. The CSCS-R widened the construct with two new scales and showed better reliability. Ethnic minority students (n = 99) perceived their curriculum as less culturally sensitive than White students (n = 182), corroborating previous findings. Black students perceived their curriculum as less culturally sensitive than Asian students. There were no significant differences between ethnic minority and White students on interest or perceived quality of relationships with teachers. Five dimensions of cultural sensitivity (Diversity Represented, Positive Depictions, Challenge Power, Inclusive Classroom Interactions, Culturally Sensitive Assessments) and perceived quality of relationships with teachers predicted interest. Ethnicity did not. Ensuring curricula and assessments represent diversity positively, challenge power and are inclusive may support students’ interest while reflecting an increasingly diverse society

    bi4africa dataset - open source

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    The bii4africa dataset is presented in a multi-spreadsheet .ods file. The raw data spreadsheet (‘Scores_Raw’) includes 31,313 individual expert estimates of the impact of a sub-Saharan African land use on a species response group of terrestrial vertebrates or vascular plants. Estimates are reported as intactness scores - the remaining proportion of an ‘intact’ reference (pre-industrial or contemporary wilderness area) population of a species response group in a land use, on a scale from 0 (no individuals remain) through 0.5 (half the individuals remain), to 1 (same as the reference population) and, in limited cases, to 2 (two or more times the reference population). For species that thrive in human-modified landscapes, scores could be greater than 1 but not exceeding 2 to avoid extremely large scores biasing aggregation exercises. Expert comments are included alongside respective estimates

    Stakeholders’ perspectives on clinical trial acceptability and approach to consent within a limited timeframe: a mixed methods study

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    Objectives The Bronchiolitis Endotracheal Surfactant Study (BESS) is a randomised controlled trial to determine the efficacy of endo-tracheal surfactant therapy for critically ill infants with bronchiolitis. To explore acceptability of BESS, including approach to consent within a limited time frame, we explored parent and staff experiences of trial involvement in the first two bronchiolitis seasons to inform subsequent trial conduct.Design A mixed-method embedded study involving a site staff survey, questionnaires and interviews with parents approached about BESS.Setting Fourteen UK paediatric intensive care units.Participants Of the 179 parents of children approached to take part in BESS, 75 parents (of 69 children) took part in the embedded study. Of these, 55/69 (78%) completed a questionnaire, and 15/69 (21%) were interviewed. Thirty-eight staff completed a questionnaire.Results Parents and staff found the trial acceptable. All constructs of the Adapted Theoretical Framework of Acceptability were met. Parents viewed surfactant as being low risk and hoped their child’s participation would help others in the future. Although parents supported research without prior consent in studies of time critical interventions, they believed there was sufficient time to consider this trial. Parents recommended that prospective informed consent should continue to be sought for BESS. Many felt that the time between the consent process and intervention being administered took too long and should be ‘streamlined’ to avoid delays in administration of trial interventions. Staff described how the training and trial processes worked well, yet patients were missed due to lack of staff to deliver the intervention, particularly at weekends.Conclusion Parents and staff supported BESS trial and highlighted aspects of the protocol, which should be refined, including a streamlined informed consent process. Findings will be useful to inform proportionate approaches to consent in future paediatric trials where there is a short timeframe for consent discussions.Trial registration number ISRCTN11746266

    Pirnilu Nintipungkupayi (Everyone Is a Teacher): Keeping Old People's Spirit Healthy Through Education

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    In the Ngaanyatjarra Lands of desert Western Australia, older people are being encouraged to participate meaningfully in student education. This initiative is being led by two of the authors of this article, senior Ngaanyatjarra women, both of whom work with the Ngaanyatjarra Lands School with its campuses in eight remote communities spread over hundreds of kilometres. Elderly men and women, some of whom are residents in the Ngaanyatjarra Aged Care home (Ngaanyatjarra Health Service, 2021), are eagerly participating in the planning of bush trips, gathering their traditional resources, seeds, grinding stones, bush resins, recalling stories, songs, and dances - as they prepare for the bush camps with students. During the camps the schoolteachers step back and the elderly lead in what is known as two‐way science. At first glance, this work may look like it is simply focused on the educational needs of students with senior Yarnangu acting in a supporting role. However, this article will demonstrate the continuous connections and responsibilities, laid out in the Tjukurrpa (the Dreaming), between the old and the young, to their ancestral lands. It sets out how according to "Tjukurrpa thinking," the principal way to provide good care is by helping senior people remain on country with family, pass on their knowledge to younger people, and thus keep strong languages and kurrunpa (people's spirit) alive

    Insights into the Synergistic Antibacterial Activity of Silver Nitrate with Potassium Tellurite against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    ABSTRACT The constant, ever-increasing antibiotic resistance crisis leads to the announcement of “urgent, novel antibiotics needed” by the World Health Organization. Our previous works showed a promising synergistic antibacterial activity of silver nitrate with potassium tellurite out of thousands of other metal/metalloid-based antibacterial combinations. The silver-tellurite combined treatment not only is more effective than common antibiotics but also prevents bacterial recovery, decreases the risk of future resistance chance, and decreases the effective concentrations. We demonstrate that the silver-tellurite combination is effective against clinical isolates. Further, this study was conducted to address knowledge gaps in the available data on the antibacterial mechanism of both silver and tellurite, as well as to give insight into how the mixture provides synergism as a combination. Here, we defined the differentially expressed gene profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa under silver, tellurite, and silver-tellurite combination stress using an RNA sequencing approach to examine the global transcriptional changes in the challenged cultures grown in simulated wound fluid. The study was complemented with metabolomics and biochemistry assays. Both metal ions mainly affected four cellular processes, including sulfur homeostasis, reactive oxygen species response, energy pathways, and the bacterial cell membrane (for silver). Using a Caenorhabditis elegans animal model we showed silver-tellurite has reduced toxicity over individual metal/metalloid salts and provides increased antioxidant properties to the host. This work demonstrates that the addition of tellurite would improve the efficacy of silver in biomedical applications. IMPORTANCE Metals and/or metalloids could represent antimicrobial alternatives for industrial and clinical applications (e.g., surface coatings, livestock, and topical infection control) because of their great properties, such as good stability and long half-life. Silver is the most common antimicrobial metal, but resistance prevalence is high, and it can be toxic to the host above a certain concentration. We found that a silver-tellurite composition has antibacterial synergistic effect and that the combination is beneficial to the host. So, the efficacy and application of silver could increase by adding tellurite in the recommended concentration(s). We used different methods to evaluate the mechanism for how this combination can be so incredibly synergistic, leading to efficacy against antibiotic- and silver-resistant isolates. Our two main findings are that (i) both silver and tellurite mostly target the same pathways and (ii) the coapplication of silver with tellurite tends not to target new pathways but targets the same pathways with an amplified change

    Variable disruption of epithelial monolayers by Neisseria meningitidis carriage isolates of the hypervirulent MenW cc11 and MenY cc23 lineages

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    Colonisation of mucosal tissues by Neisseria meningitidis requires adhesion mediated by the Type IV pilus and multiple outer membrane proteins. Penetration of the mucosa and invasion of epithelial cells are thought to contribute to host persistence and invasive disease. Using Calu-3 cell monolayers grown at an liquid-air interface, we examined adhesion, invasion and monolayer disruption by carriage isolates of two clonal complexes of N. meningitidis. Carriage isolates of both the serogroup Y cc23 and the hypervirulent serogroup W cc11 lineages exhibited high levels of cellular adhesion, and a variable disruption phenotype across independent isolates. Inactivation of the gene encoding the main pilus sub-unit in multiple cc11 isolates abrogated both adhesive capacity and ability to disrupt epithelial monolayers. Contrastingly, inactivation of the phase-variable opa or nadA genes reduced adhesion and invasion, but not disruption of monolayer integrity. Adherence of tissue-disruptive meningococci correlated with loss of staining for the tight junction protein, occludin. Intriguingly, in a pilus-negative strain background, we observed compensatory ON switching of opa genes which facilitated continued adhesion. We conclude that disruption of epithelial monolayers occurs in multiple meningococcal lineages but can vary during carriage and is intimately linked to pilus-mediated adhesion
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