1,408 research outputs found

    Pattern matching and pattern discovery algorithms for protein topologies

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    We describe algorithms for pattern matching and pattern learning in TOPS diagrams (formal descriptions of protein topologies). These problems can be reduced to checking for subgraph isomorphism and finding maximal common subgraphs in a restricted class of ordered graphs. We have developed a subgraph isomorphism algorithm for ordered graphs, which performs well on the given set of data. The maximal common subgraph problem then is solved by repeated subgraph extension and checking for isomorphisms. Despite the apparent inefficiency such approach gives an algorithm with time complexity proportional to the number of graphs in the input set and is still practical on the given set of data. As a result we obtain fast methods which can be used for building a database of protein topological motifs, and for the comparison of a given protein of known secondary structure against a motif database

    Spinal epidural abscess: a rare complication of olecranon bursitis

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    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal condition if left untreated. We report the case of a 67-year old man who presented to the Accident and Emergency department complaining of acute onset of inter-scapular back pain, left leg weakness and loss of sensation in the left foot. On examination he was found to be pyrexial with long tract signs in the left lower leg. In addition he had a left sided olecranon bursitis of three weeks duration. Blood tests revealed raised inflammatory markers and a staphylococcal bacteremia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and he subsequently underwent a three level laminectomy with good resolution of his back pain and neurological symptoms. He has made a complete recovery with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics

    The suitability of the IEC 61400-2 wind model for small wind turbines operating in the built environment

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    This paper investigates the applicability of the assumed wind fields in International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard 61400 Part 2, the design standard for small wind turbines, for a turbine operating in the built environment, and the effects these wind fields have on the predicted performance of a 5 kW Aerogenesis turbine using detailed aeroelastic models developed in Fatigue Aerodynamics Structures and Turbulence (FAST). Detailed wind measurements were acquired at two built environment sites: from the rooftop of a Bunnings Ltd. warehouse at Port Kennedy (PK) (Perth, Australia) and from the small wind turbine site at the University of Newcastle at Callaghan (Newcastle, Australia). For both sites, IEC 61400-2 underestimates the turbulence intensity for the majority of the measured wind speeds. A detailed aeroelastic model was built in FAST using the assumed wind field from IEC 61400-2 and the measured wind fields from PK and Callaghan as an input to predict key turbine performance parameters. The results of this analysis show a modest increase in the predicted mean power for the higher turbulence regimes of PK and Callaghan as well as higher variation in output power. Predicted mean rotor thrust and blade flapwise loading showed a minor increase due to higher turbulence, with mean predicted torque almost identical but with increased variations due to higher turbulence. Damage equivalent loading for the blade flapwise moment was predicted to be 58% and 11% higher for a turbine operating at Callaghan and PK respectively, when compared with IEC 61400-2 wind field. Time series plots for blade flapwise moments and power spectral density plots in the frequency domain show consistently higher blade flapwise bending moments for the Callaghan site with both the sites showing a once-per-revolution response

    Enabled Negatively Regulates Diaphanous-Driven Actin Dynamics In Vitro and In Vivo

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    Actin regulators facilitate cell migration by controlling cell protrusion architecture and dynamics. As the behavior of individual actin regulators becomes clear, we must address why cells require multiple regulators with similar functions and how they cooperate to create diverse protrusions. We characterized Diaphanous (Dia) and Enabled (Ena) as a model, using complementary approaches: cell culture, biophysical analysis, and Drosophila morphogenesis. We found that Dia and Ena have distinct biochemical properties that contribute to the different protrusion morphologies each induces. Dia is a more processive, faster elongator, paralleling the long, stable filopodia it induces in vivo, while Ena promotes filopodia with more dynamic changes in number, length, and lifetime. Acting together, Ena and Dia induce protrusions distinct from those induced by either alone, with Ena reducing Dia-driven protrusion length and number. Consistent with this, EnaEVH1 binds Dia directly and inhibits DiaFH1FH2-mediated nucleation in vitro. Finally, Ena rescues hemocyte migration defects caused by activated Dia

    Genomic and transcriptional analysis of protein heterogeneity of the honeybee venom allergen Api m 6

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    Several components of honeybee venom are known to cause allergenic responses in humans and other vertebrates. One such component, the minor allergen Api m 6, has been known to show amino acid variation but the genetic mechanism for this variation is unknown. Here we show that Api m 6 is derived from a single locus, and that substantial protein-level variation has a simple genome-level cause, without the need to invoke multiple loci or alternatively spliced exons. Api m 6 sits near a misassembled section of the honeybee genome sequence, and we propose that a substantial number of indels at and near Api m 6 might be the root cause of this misassembly. We suggest that genes such as Api m 6 with coding-region or untranslated region indels might have had a strong effect on the assembly of this draft of the honeybee genome

    Multi-layered Ruthenium-modified Bond Coats for Thermal Barrier Coatings

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    Diffusional approaches for fabrication of multi-layered Ru-modified bond coats for thermal barrier coatings have been developed via low activity chemical vapor deposition and high activity pack aluminization. Both processes yield bond coats comprising two distinct B2 layers, based on NiAl and RuAl, however, the position of these layers relative to the bond coat surface is reversed when switching processes. The structural evolution of each coating at various stages of the fabrication process has been and subsequent cyclic oxidation is presented, and the relevant interdiffusion and phase equilibria issues in are discussed. Evaluation of the oxidation behavior of these Ru-modified bond coat structures reveals that each B2 interlayer arrangement leads to the formation of α-Al 2 O 3 TGO at 1100°C, but the durability of the TGO is somewhat different and in need of further improvement in both cases

    Defining Physical Literacy for Application in Australia: A Modified Delphi Method

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    Purpose. The development of a physical literacy definition and standards framework suitable for implementation in Australia. Method. Modified Delphi methodology. Results . Consensus was established on four defining statements: Core – Physical literacy is lifelong holistic learning acquired and applied in movement and physical activity contexts; Composition – Physical literacy reflects ongoing changes integrating physical, psychological, cognitive and social capabilities; Importance – Physical literacy is vital in helping us lead healthy and fulfilling lives through movement and physical activity; Aspiration – A physically literate person is able to draw on their integrated physical, psychological, cognitive, and social capacities to support health promoting and fulfilling movement and physical activity, relative to their situation and context, throughout the lifespan. The standards framework addressed four learning domains (physical, psychological, cognitive, and social), spanning five learning configurations/levels. Conclusion. The development of a bespoke program for a new context has important implications for both existing and future program

    Solar Cell Degradation due to Proton Belt Enhancements During Electric Orbit Raising to GEO

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    The recent introduction of all‐electric propulsion on geosynchronous satellites enables lower‐cost access to space by replacing chemical propellant. However, the time period required to initially raise the satellite to geostationary orbit (GEO) is around 200 days. During this time the satellite can be exposed to dynamic increases in trapped flux which are challenging to model. To understand the potential penalty of this new technique in terms of radiation exposure, the influence of several key parameters on solar cell degradation during the electric orbit raising period has been investigated. This is achieved by calculating the accumulation of non‐ionising dose through time for a range of approaches. We demonstrate the changes in degradation caused by launching during a long‐lived (100s of days) enhancement in MeV trapped proton flux for three different electric orbit raising scenarios and three different thicknesses of coverglass. Results show that launching in an active environment can increase solar cell degradation due to trapped protons by ~5% before start of service compared with a quiet environment. The crucial energy range for such enhancements in proton flux is 3‐10MeV (depending on shielding). Further changes of a few percent can occur between different trajectories, or when a 50μm change in coverglass thickness is applied
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