7,839 research outputs found

    What Can Be Done About A Disruptive Physician? A Legal Analysis

    Get PDF
    House, a medical drama about an infectious disease specialist, entertained television audiences for years as the irascible and pill-popping physician solved medical mysteries with the zeal of a modern-day Sherlock Holmes while playing mind games with his coworkers. Uncanny intuition and eccentric thinking earned the physician great respect but his bullish behavior and antisocial tendencies were a distraction at the hospital. Not only did Dr. House clash with his fellow physicians but he also insulted patients, flouted hospital rules and caused great conflict with the hospital administrators. In fact, his actions often crossed the line into obnoxiousness and rage causing the hospital staff to tiptoe around his dysfunctional behavior. In the real world, Dr. House would be labeled a “disruptive physician” and would be subjected to disciplinary action including the loss of his hospital privileges. This article will explore the problems caused by being labeled a disruptive physician in a legal context with a focus on the peer review process and the relevant court cases

    A simple method for the determination of effective rain cell dimensions and orientation

    Get PDF
    A simple method is proposed for the determination of effective rain cell dimensions and orientation. Two rain cell models were considered: the circular cell and the elliptical cell. In both models it is assumed that the rain rate is constant throughout the cell, that all cell locations are equally likely, and that the cell dimensions depend upon the rain rate. It is then shown that the effective cell dimensions and orientation may be deduced from rain rate statistics accumulated at two or three closely spaced sites, depending upon the model chosen. The results of this study alone with previous estimates of rain cell dimension indicate that the rain rate measurement points should be spaced on the order of one-half kilometer apart. The proposed method is simple and relatively inexpensive; thus, this approach is readily suited to the study of the dependence of rain cell size and orientation upon climatic region. The resulting rain cell characteristics are of direct value in the prediction of millimeter wavelength attenuation statistics on both single-terminal and diversity earth-space propagation paths as well as point-to-point terrestrial links

    The effects of precipitation on radar target identification and imaging

    Get PDF
    The properties of precipitation which will influence radar system design are discussed. The spatial characteristics of rainfall and the sizes and shapes of raindrops are described. The dielectric behavior of water is combined with these characteristics to determine the effects of rain on electromagnetic waves. These effects include: absorption, scatter, noise emission, phase shift, and depolarization

    An improved empirical model for diversity gain on Earth-space propagation paths

    Get PDF
    An empirical model was generated to estimate diversity gain on Earth-space propagation paths as a function of Earth terminal separation distance, link frequency, elevation angle, and angle between the baseline and the path azimuth. The resulting model reproduces the entire experimental data set with an RMS error of 0.73 dB

    Millimeter wavelength propagation studies

    Get PDF
    The investigations conducted for the Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Studies during the period December, 1966, to June 1974 are reported. These efforts included the preparation for the ATS-5 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment and the subsequent data acquisition and data analysis. The emphasis of the OSU participation in this experiment was placed on the determination of reliability improvement resulting from the use of space diversity on a millimeter wavelength earth-space communication link. Related measurements included the determination of the correlation between radiometric temperature and attenuation along the earth-space propagation path. Along with this experimental effort a theoretical model was developed for the prediction of attenuation statistics on single and spatially separated earth space propagation paths. A High Resolution Radar/Radiometer System and Low Resolution Radar System were developed and implemented for the study of intense rain cells in preparation for the ATS-6 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment

    Millimeter wavelength propagation studies

    Get PDF
    Diversity data obtained using the ATS-5 satellite and available BTL data were compared with optimum diversity gain predictions. This comparison indicates that terminal spacings exceeding 8 km result in values of diversity gain within 1.5 dB of the optimum. The thunderstorm cell modeling technique for predicting attenuation and diversity gain statistics was extended to include ellipsoidal cell models. A three rain gage method for the measurement of cell size, ellipticity, and orientation was developed

    The importance of cost considerations in the systems engineering process

    Get PDF
    This paper examines the question of cost, from the birth of a program to its conclusion, particularly from the point of view of large multi-center programs, and suggests how to avoid some of the traps and pitfalls. Emphasis is given to cost in the systems engineering process, but there is an inevitable overlap with program management. (These terms, systems engineering and program management, have never been clearly defined.) In these days of vast Federal budget deficits and increasing overseas competition, it is imperative that we get more for each research and development dollar. This is the only way we will retain our leadership in high technology and, in the long run, our way of life

    A 15.3 GHz satellite-to-ground diversity experiment utilizing the ATS-5 satellite

    Get PDF
    During 1970 and 1971 the characteristics of a diversity satellite-to-ground communication link were measured using the ATS-5 15.3 GHz downlink. These data were gathered at two ground receiving terminals spaced 4 km apart during 1970 and 8 km apart during 1971 in the vicinity of Columbus, Ohio. These data have been subsequently analyzed to determine the improvement in link performance resulting from the use of space diversity. The results of this analysis have shown that substantial improvements in link performance may be gained through the use of space diversity on satellite-to-ground paths. For example, the durations of fades having depths exceeding 10 dB were reduced by more than two orders of magnitude for both the 4 and 8 km site separation distances

    Meteorological radar calibration

    Get PDF
    A meteorological radar calibration technique is developed. It is found that the integrated, range corrected, received power saturates under intense rain conditions in a manner analogous to that encountered for the radiometric path temperature. Furthermore, it is found that this saturation condition establishes a bound which may be used to determine an absolution radar calibration for the case of radars operating at attenuating wavelengths. In the case of less intense rainfall or for radars at nonattenuating wavelengths, the relationship for direct calibration in terms of an independent measurement of radiometric path temperature is developed. This approach offers the advantage that the calibration is in terms of an independent measurement of the rainfall through the same elevated region as that viewed by the radar

    ATS-6 millimeter wavelength propagation experiment

    Get PDF
    An empirical relation for path diversity gain as a function of terminal separation distance and single site fade depth is presented. This relation is based on existing 15.3 GHz ATS-5 attenuation data and 16.0 GHz radiometric temperature data for earth-space propagation paths. Preliminary 30 GHz ATS-6 diversity data are presented and are found to agree well with this empirical relation
    • …
    corecore