153 research outputs found

    Does the quality of orthodontic studies influence their Altmetric Attention Score?

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    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to determine whether an association between study quality, other study characteristics, and Altmetric Attention Scores (AASs) existed in orthodontic studies. METHODS The Scopus database was searched to identify orthodontic studies published between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2019. Articles that satisfied the eligibility criteria were included in this study. Study characteristics, including study quality were extracted and entered into a pre-pilot data collection sheet. Descriptive statistics were calculated. On an exploratory basis, random forest and gradient boosting machine learning algorithms were used to examine the influence of article characteristics on AAS. RESULTS In total, 586 studies with an AAS were analyzed. Overall, the mean AAS of the samples was 5. Twitter was the most popular social media platform for publicizing studies, accounting for 53.7%. In terms of study quality, only 19.1% of the studies were rated as having a high level of quality, with 41.8% of the studies deemed moderate quality. The type of social media platform, number of citations, impact factor, and study type were among the most influential characteristics of AAS in both models. In contrast, study quality was one of the least influential characteristics on the AAS. CONCLUSIONS Social media platforms contributed the most to the AAS for orthodontic studies, whereas study quality had little impact on the AAS

    The quality and content of websites in the UK advertising aligner therapy: are standards being met?

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    Aims To evaluate the quality of information and compliance with General Dental Council (GDC) ethical advertising guidelines for English-language orthodontic websites providing orthodontic treatment with aligners in the United Kingdom (UK).Materials and methods The term 'orthodontic aligners or braces' was entered into the Google online search engine. The first 100 English language orthodontic websites (practice or company) were pooled. Both the quality (DISCERN instrument) and compliance with GDC ethical advertising guidelines were assessed. Frequency distributions and the overall summative DISCERN score for each website were calculated.Results The overall mean DISCERN score was 42.9 (SD = 9.4). The quality of information was only rated as good-excellent for 16% of websites and only 11% of websites showed full compliance with GDC guidelines on ethical advertising. A link to the GDC/authority website (75%), the date when the website was last updated (72%), and the practice complaints policy (66%) were not commonly provided. The country of qualification, a statement of whether practices provide NHS or private treatment or a combination of both, and the date when the website was last updated, were significant predictors for the overall quality based on DISCERN score.Conclusions The quality of information provided on websites providing aligner therapy and their compliance with GDC guidelines on ethical advertising was suboptimal. An improvement in both areas is required

    Clinical evaluation of marketed and non-marketed orthodontic products: are researchers now ahead of the times? A meta-epidemiological study.

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    BACKGROUND The advertisement and adoption of untested orthodontic products is common. This study aimed to provide an update regarding the prevalence of clinical trials in orthodontics evaluating commercially marketed products. Associations between marketed/non-marketed products and study characteristics such as direction of effect, declaration of conflict of interest and industry sponsorship were evaluated. In addition, within the marketed products associations between direction of effect and study characteristics were explored. MATERIAL AND METHODS Electronic searching of a single database (Medline via PubMed) was undertaken to identify Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published over a 5-year period (1st January 2017 to 31st December 2021). Descriptive statistics and associations between trial characteristics were explored. RESULTS 196 RCTs were analysed. RCTs were frequently published in Angle Orthodontist (18.4%), American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (14.8%) and European Journal of Orthodontics (13.3%). 65.3% (128/196) of trials assessed marketed products after their introduction. The majority of trials assessed interventions to improve treatment efficiency (33.7%). Growth modification appliances were typically analysed in non-marketed compared to marketed products. An association between the type of product (marketed vs non-marketed) and both the declaration of conflict of interest and industry sponsorship was detected. For individual RCTs assessing marketed products either a positive effect (45.3%) or equivalence between interventions or between intervention and untreated control (47.7%) was evident. In 27% of these trials either no conflict of interest or industry funding was not clearly declared. Within the marketed products, no association between the direction of the effect and conflict of interest or funding was detected. CONCLUSIONS The analysis of marketed orthodontic products after their introduction is still common practice. To reduce research waste, collaboration prior to the licensing and marketing of orthodontic products between researchers, industry and manufacturers is recommended

    Salivary peptidome analysis and protease prediction during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances

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    Abstract Orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) occurs through proteolytic remodelling within the periodontium following the application of external force to the tooth. This study describes the first characterization of the salivary peptidome and protease profile during the alignment stage of fixed appliance orthodontic treatment. Unstimulated whole mouth saliva from 16 orthodontic patients (10 males, 6 females, mean (SD) age 15.2 (1.6) years) was collected prior to fixed appliance placement (T1), 1-h (T2), 1-week (T3) following fixed appliance placement and on completion of mandibular arch alignment (T4). Salivary peptides were extracted using filtration followed by mass spectrometry to identify amino acid sequences. Protease prediction was carried out in silico using Proteasix and validated with gelatin zymography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A total of 2852 naturally-occurring peptides were detected, originating from 436 different proteins. Both collagen and statherin-derived peptide levels were increased at T2. Proteasix predicted 73 proteases potentially involved in generating these peptides, including metalloproteinases, calpains and cathepsins. Changes in predicted activity of proteases over time were also observed, with most metalloproteinases showing increased predicted activity at T2‚ÄďT3. Increased gelatinolytic activity and MMP8/MMP9 levels were detected at T3. Collectively, multiple protein targets and changes in protease-predicted activity during OTM have been identified

    The prevalence of and factors influencing statistical testing of baseline characteristics in randomized controlled trials published in high-impact orthodontic journals.

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    INTRODUCTION When proper randomization has been undertaken, statistical testing of baseline characteristics between participants in trial arms in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is not required. This investigation aimed to assess the prevalence of statistical testing of baseline differences in orthodontic RCTs. Factors influencing the undertaking of this analysis were explored. METHODS Orthodontic RCTs published between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2021 in 5 orthodontic journals were identified. To determine if statistical testing of baseline differences had been undertaken, each article was reviewed in detail to identify the reporting of P values and the term "significant difference" in the table of characteristics, the table legends, and the results section of each included RCT. Trial characteristics at the RCT level were extracted. Frequency distributions were calculated for the included trial characteristics. Significant predictors from the univariate analysis were used to construct a multivariable Bayesian logistic regression model. RESULTS One hundred and thirty-two RCTs were analyzed. Significance testing of baseline characteristics was undertaken in 50% (66/132) of RCTs. At a journal level, significance testing at baseline was infrequently undertaken in RCTs published in the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO). Compared with 2017, RCTs published in 2018 (odds ratio [OR], 5.57; 95% credible interval [CrI], 1.33-25.69), 2019 (OR, 17.82; 95% CrI, 4.41-82.11), 2020 (OR, 6.48; 95% CrI, 1.72-27.12), and 2021 (OR, 3.24, 95% CrI, 0.81-14.01) had higher odds of significance testing at baseline. RCTs published in the European Journal of Orthodontics (OR, 5.31; 95% CrI, 1.79-17.04), Progress in Orthodontics (OR, 5.00; 95% CrI, 0.97-28.43), Orthodontics and Craniofacial Research (OR, 6.49; 95% CrI, 1.04-46.10), and Angle Orthodontist (OR, 12.30; 95% CrI, 3.27-51.44) had higher odds of significant testing at baseline testing compared with AJODO. CONCLUSIONS Statistical testing of baseline differences is common in orthodontic RCTs. Trials published in AJODO had the lowest incidence of statistical testing of baseline differences. RCTs published between 2018-2021 had higher odds of significance testing at baseline than in 2017. Per the consolidated standards of reporting trials guidelines, this practice should be discouraged as it can be misleading and unnecessary

    Duration of tooth alignment with fixed appliances: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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    INTRODUCTION A key goal of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances is alignment of the dentition, and this remains a commonly selected outcome in clinical studies investigating orthodontic tooth movement. This systematic review has evaluated treatment duration to achieve alignment of the mandibular dentition using fixed appliances. METHODS Systematic literature searches without restrictions were undertaken in 9 databases for randomized clinical trials (RCTs) assessing duration and rate of tooth alignment using fixed appliances with or without treatment adjuncts published up to January 2021. After duplicate study selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment according to Cochrane, random-effects meta-analyses of aggregate data, and individual patient data were conducted. RESULTS Thirty-five trials were included with 2258 participants (39% male; mean age 17.8 years), giving a pooled duration to achieve whole-arch alignment of the mandibular dentition of 263.0 days (4 trials; 95% confidence interval [CI], 186.7-339.4 days) and incisor alignment in the mandibular arch of 100.7 days (9 trials; 95% CI, 84.1-117.4 days). Surgical-assisted orthodontics was associated with reduced duration of incisor alignment: mean difference of 44.3 days less (4 trials; 95% CI, 20.0-68.9 days; P <0.001; high quality of evidence), whereas subgroup and meta-regression analyses indicated significant effects of baseline crowding and premolar extractions. Individual patient data analysis from 3 RCTs indicated that for each additional participant age year, whole-arch alignment of the mandibular dentition took 13.7 days longer (3 trials; 95% CI, 7.7-17.7 days; P <0.001) and for each additional mm of irregularity, 17.5 days more were needed (2 trials; 95% CI, 9.8-25.2 days; P <0.001). CONCLUSIONS Patient and treatment-related characteristics can significantly affect the duration of tooth alignment and should be taken into account both clinically and when designing trial outcomes. Future research studies investigating rates of orthodontic tooth alignment would benefit from adequate sample sizes and a more consistent methodology in outcome assessment. Data in this systematic review provides a basis for appropriate trial design for future RCTs investigating the rate of orthodontic tooth alignment with fixed appliances

    Do we get better outcomes from early treatment of Class III discrepancies?

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    Early orthodontic treatment in the mixed dentition aims to simplify definitive treatment in the permanent dentition. In Class III cases, this can be an effective strategy for the management of a local anterior crossbite, using either a removable or simple fixed appliance. For more significant Class III malocclusions, the decision to intervene early is a more difficult one. Traditionally, orthodontists in the UK have been reluctant to embark on early treatment in the presence of a skeletal Class III relationship but there is now some evidence that in selected cases, the use of protraction headgear can be a successful method of avoiding the need for later surgery. Although growth prediction in Class III cases is notoriously difficult, in the presence of maxillary retrognathia, the general dental practitioner should consider early referral of Class III cases to a specialist orthodontist

    Reflections on the delivery of online postgraduate specialty membership examinations in orthodontics

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    Highlights the need for remote specialist examinations in orthodontics during the pandemic. Discusses the modifications required to the existing assessment for remote delivery. Candidate and examiner feedback metrics are presented

    Duration of canine retraction with fixed appliances: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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    INTRODUCTION Space closure is a challenging and time-consuming phase of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. This systematic review evaluated canine retraction duration using fixed appliances after maxillary first premolar extraction. METHODS Unrestricted systematic literature searches were conducted in 8 databases for randomized clinical trials, assessing the duration and rate of maxillary canine retraction using fixed appliances with or without treatment adjuncts published up to July 2021. Study selection, data extraction, and risk of bias evaluation were conducted independently and in duplicate. Random-effects meta-analyses of average rates or mean differences (MD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were conducted at őĪ¬†= 5%, followed by sensitivity and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation analysis. RESULTS Fifty randomized clinical trials (6 parallel and 44 split-mouth designs) covering 811 participants (mean age 19.9 years; 34% male) were included. The estimated average pooled duration to achieve complete canine retraction was 4.98 months (2 trials; 95% CI, -2.9 to 12.88 months). Pooled average canine retraction was 0.97 mm at months 0-1 (23 trials; 95% CI, 0.79-1.16), 1.83 mm at months 0-2 (20 trials; 95% CI, 1.52-2.14), 2.44 mm at months 0-3 (23 trials; 95% CI, 2.10-2.79), 3.49 mm at months 0-4 (6 trials; 95% CI, 1.81-5.17) and 4.25 mm at months 0-5 (2 trials; 95% CI, 0.36-8.14). Surgically-assisted orthodontics was associated with greater canine retraction at all time points: months 0-1 (10 trials; MD, 0.52 mm; P¬†= 0.004), months 0-2 (8 trials; MD, 0.53 mm; P¬†= 0.04), months 0-3 (8 trials; MD, 0.67 mm; P¬†= 0.01), and months 0-4 (3 trials; MD, 1.13 mm; P¬†= 0.01), whereas subgroup analyses indicated significant effects of anchorage reinforcement method and bracket slot size on canine retraction. CONCLUSIONS The average time to achieve complete retraction of the maxillary canine using fixed appliances was around 5.0 months. Most studies used split-mouth randomization to investigate canine retraction for around 1-3 months, with substantial heterogeneity across studies. At 3 months of treatment, high-quality evidence supported greater canine retraction with surgically-assisted orthodontics

    Should we recommend early overjet reduction to prevent dental trauma

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    There is an association between increased overjet and risk of trauma to the maxillary incisor teeth in children and adolescents. It would therefore seem sensible to recommend overjet reduction as early as possible to help reduce this risk. However, orthodontic outcomes are essentially the same whether you start treatment in the early or late mixed dentition, while early treatment carries a heavier burden on compliance - taking longer and involving more appointments. This article explores the complex association between early overjet reduction and dental trauma in the context of current best evidence. Careful case selection is advised when justifying early intervention for increased overjet based on reducing trauma risk
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