31 research outputs found

    Large magnetoelectric resistance in the topological Dirac semimetal α-Sn.

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    The spin-momentum locking of surface states in topological materials can produce a resistance that scales linearly with magnetic and electric fields. Such a bilinear magnetoelectric resistance (BMER) effect offers a new approach for information reading and field sensing applications, but the effects demonstrated so far are too weak or for low temperatures. This article reports the first observation of BMER effects in topological Dirac semimetals; the BMER responses were measured at room temperature and were substantially stronger than those reported previously. The experiments used topological Dirac semimetal α-Sn thin films grown on silicon substrates. The films showed BMER responses that are 106 times larger than previously measured at room temperature and are also larger than those previously obtained at low temperatures. These results represent a major advance toward realistic BMER applications. Significantly, the data also yield the first characterization of three-dimensional Fermi-level spin texture of topological surface states in α-Sn

    Record thermopower found in an IrMn-based spintronic stack

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    The Seebeck effect converts thermal gradients into electricity. As an approach to power technologies in the current Internet-of-Things era, on-chip energy harvesting is highly attractive, and to be effective, demands thin film materials with large Seebeck coefficients. In spintronics, the antiferromagnetic metal IrMn has been used as the pinning layer in magnetic tunnel junctions that form building blocks for magnetic random access memories and magnetic sensors. Spin pumping experiments revealed that IrMn Neel temperature is thickness-dependent and approaches room temperature when the layer is thin. Here, we report that the Seebeck coefficient is maximum at the Neel temperature of IrMn of 0.6 to 4.0nm in thickness in IrMn-based half magnetic tunnel junctions. We obtain a record Seebeck coefficient 390 (10) mu V K-1 at room temperature. Our results demonstrate that IrMn-based magnetic devices could harvest the heat dissipation for magnetic sensors, thus contributing to the Power-of-Things paradigm. Antiferromagnetic materials are potentially useful for spintronic applications. Here, the authors report high thermoelectric power value of 390 mu V/K Seebeck coefficient in IrMn-based half magnetic tunnel junctions at room temperature

    Nonreciprocal coherent coupling of nanomagnets by exchange spin waves

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    Nanomagnets are widely used to store information in non-volatile spintronic devices. Spin waves can transfer information with low-power consumption as their propagations are independent of charge transport. However, to dynamically couple two distant nanomagnets via spin waves remains a major challenge for magnonics. Here we experimentally demonstrate coherent coupling of two distant Co nanowires by fast propagating spin waves in an yttrium iron garnet thin film with sub-50 nm wavelengths. Magnons in two nanomagnets are unidirectionally phase-locked with phase shifts controlled by magnon spin torque and spin-wave propagation. The coupled system is finally formulated by an analytical theory in terms of an effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. Our results are attractive for analog neuromorphic computing that requires unidirectional information transmission. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]</p

    Nonreciprocal coherent coupling of nanomagnets by exchange spin waves

    No full text
    Nanomagnets are widely used to store information in non-volatile spintronic devices. Spin waves can transfer information with low-power consumption as their propagations are independent of charge transport. However, to dynamically couple two distant nanomagnets via spin waves remains a major challenge for magnonics. Here we experimentally demonstrate coherent coupling of two distant Co nanowires by fast propagating spin waves in an yttrium iron garnet thin film with sub-50 nm wavelengths. Magnons in two nanomagnets are unidirectionally phase-locked with phase shifts controlled by magnon spin torque and spin-wave propagation. The coupled system is finally formulated by an analytical theory in terms of an effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. Our results are attractive for analog neuromorphic computing that requires unidirectional information transmission. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]Accepted Author ManuscriptQN/Bauer Grou

    Record thermopower found in an IrMn-based spintronic stack

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    The Seebeck effect converts thermal gradients into electricity. As an approach to power technologies in the current Internet-of-Things era, on-chip energy harvesting is highly attractive, and to be effective, demands thin film materials with large Seebeck coefficients. In spintronics, the antiferromagnetic metal IrMn has been used as the pinning layer in magnetic tunnel junctions that form building blocks for magnetic random access memories and magnetic sensors. Spin pumping experiments revealed that IrMn Néel temperature is thickness-dependent and approaches room temperature when the layer is thin. Here, we report that the Seebeck coefficient is maximum at the Néel temperature of IrMn of 0.6 to 4.0 nm in thickness in IrMn-based half magnetic tunnel junctions. We obtain a record Seebeck coefficient 390 (±10) μV K-1 at room temperature. Our results demonstrate that IrMn-based magnetic devices could harvest the heat dissipation for magnetic sensors, thus contributing to the Power-of-Things paradigm

    Record thermopower found in an IrMn-based spintronic stack

    No full text
    The Seebeck effect converts thermal gradients into electricity. As an approach to power technologies in the current Internet-of-Things era, on-chip energy harvesting is highly attractive, and to be effective, demands thin film materials with large Seebeck coefficients. In spintronics, the antiferromagnetic metal IrMn has been used as the pinning layer in magnetic tunnel junctions that form building blocks for magnetic random access memories and magnetic sensors. Spin pumping experiments revealed that IrMn Néel temperature is thickness-dependent and approaches room temperature when the layer is thin. Here, we report that the Seebeck coefficient is maximum at the Néel temperature of IrMn of 0.6 to 4.0 nm in thickness in IrMn-based half magnetic tunnel junctions. We obtain a record Seebeck coefficient 390 (±10) μV K−1 at room temperature. Our results demonstrate that IrMn-based magnetic devices could harvest the heat dissipation for magnetic sensors, thus contributing to the Power-of-Things paradigm
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