16 research outputs found

    Self-Perceived Job Performance as a Mediator of the Effects of Academic Satisfaction and Quality on Loyalty

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    Globally, there is increased customer mobility and competition within the higher education sector. As such, university management and administration practices should consider academic satisfaction, quality and loyalty as important factors to infl uence graduate job performance. The study was conducted to see if self-perceived job performance had a role in mediating the effect of academic satisfaction and perceived academic quality on academic loyalty. Data was collected from 714 respondents using a cross-sectional survey. The covariance-based structural equation modelling was used to test the hypotheses. According to the study results, self-perceived job performance partially mediates the eff ect of both academic satisfaction and academic quality on academic loyalty. The study fi ndings emphasise the importance of graduate quality and satisfaction in influencing loyalty. Thus, the higher education sector should take cognisance of self-perceived job performance as this also infl uences academic loyalty

    Consumer ethnocentrism in developing countries: Application of a model in Zimbabwe

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    Orientation: The study focused on the application of a model of consumer ethnocentrism in Zimbabwe, a developing country. Research purpose: The study sought to determine the effect of consumer ethnocentrism on consumer attitude, to determine the effect of consumer attitude on purchase intention and to establish the moderating effects of gender, age, education, income, ethnic grouping and city of residence on the effect of consumer ethnocentrism on consumer attitude. Motivation for the study: Research on consumer ethnocentrism in developing countries is still in its infancy. There is a need to conduct more research on consumer ethnocentrism in developing countries in order to enhance an understanding of this important construct in international marketing. Research design, approach and method: The study uses a cross section of 289 consumers from Harare and Bulawayo, the two largest cities in Zimbabwe. Structural equation modeling and moderated regression analysis were conducted to test the research hypotheses. Main findings: The study found that consumer ethnocentrism has a negative effect on consumer attitude, and consumer attitude has a positive effect on purchase intention. None of the demographic variables was found to significantly moderate the effect of consumer ethnocentrism on consumer attitude. Practical and managerial implications: Marketers who intend to expand into developing markets such as Zimbabwe are advised to consider consumer ethnocentrism and attitudes towards foreign poultry products. Firms targeting foreign markets where consumers are ethnocentric, such as in Zimbabwe, are advised to set up manufacturing facilities in such countries instead of exporting. Contribution and value-add: The study enhances our understanding of consumer ethnocentrism in developing countries where research on consumer ethnocentrism is still in its infancy

    Are all customers really the same? Comparing service quality and satisfaction between residential and business telecommunications customers

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    Orientation: The study focused on the moderating role of the type of customer on the relationship between service quality and customer satisfaction. Research purpose: The study sought to examine differences in the relationship between service quality and customer satisfaction because of the type of customer. Motivation for the study: Previous studies have not examined the relationship between service quality and customer satisfaction between residential and business customers. Research design, approach and method: The study used a cross-section of 203 customers (108 residential and 95 business) in the fixed-line telecommunications sector in Zimbabwe. Moderated regression analysis was performed to test the research hypotheses. Main findings: It was established that the customer category (residential versus business) does not moderate the effect of service quality on customer satisfaction. Practical/managerial implications are, generally, that it is not necessary to segment customers by customer category (residential versus business) when managing service quality to achieve customer satisfaction. Contribution/value add: The main theoretical contribution of the study is the comparison of the effect of servic

    Are all customers really the same? Comparing service quality and satisfaction between residential and business telecommunications customers

    No full text
    Orientation: The study focused on the moderating role of the type of customer on the relationship between service quality and customer satisfaction. Research purpose: The study sought to examine differences in the relationship between service quality and customer satisfaction because of the type of customer. Motivation for the study: Previous studies have not examined the relationship between service quality and customer satisfaction between residential and business customers. Research design, approach and method: The study used a cross-section of 203 customers (108 residential and 95 business) in the fixed-line telecommunications sector in Zimbabwe. Moderated regression analysis was performed to test the research hypotheses. Main findings: It was established that the customer category (residential versus business) does not moderate the effect of service quality on customer satisfaction. Practical/managerial implications are, generally, that it is not necessary to segment customers by customer category (residential versus business) when managing service quality to achieve customer satisfaction. Contribution/value add: The main theoretical contribution of the study is the comparison of the effect of service quality on customer satisfaction between residential and business customers

    ICT Usage and its Effect on Export Performance: Empirical Evidence from Small and Medium Enterprises in the Manufacturing Sector in Zimbabwe

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    Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Zimbabwe have been considered as the future driver of economic development. And yet they are not spared from global competition that threatens their existence. Adoption of information and communication technology (ICT) has been regarded as one of the strategies for survival in this global competitive environment. However, there is a paucity of empirical evidence on the effect of ICT usage on export performance of SMEs. This study was, therefore, undertaken to examine the effect of ICT usage on the export performance of SMEs in the manufacturing sector in Zimbabwe. A cross-sectional survey of 243 SMEs was conducted in Harare, the capital city of Zimbabwe. Results show that overall ICT usage positively predicts the export performance of manufacturing SMEs. However, the ICT’s prediction of the export performance is dimension-specific. Of the three dimensions of ICT usage, only relationship building capabilities significantly predicts export performance while market intelligence and marketing capabilities do not significantly predict export performance. The paper recommends that the use of ICT should be aligned with the goals of the firms

    Examining the measurement and dimensionality of the construct of consumer awareness in a developing and transition economy

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    Orientation: Literature suggests that major political and socio-economic transformations may influence the measurement and dimensionality of consumer awareness. Research purpose: The study examined the measurement and dimensionality of the construct of consumer awareness after transformation in the political and socio-economic environments in Zimbabwe. Motivation for the study: There is a dearth of research to validate whether or not the measurement and dimensionality of the construct of consumer awareness changes as the environment changes. Research design, approach and method: Data were collected from a cross-section of 305 consumers using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Consumers were intercepted at shopping malls. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse data. Main findings: The study confirmed that consumer awareness comprises five dimensions, namely product knowledge, bargain hunting, general consumer knowledge, price consciousness and information search. However, the study found that only 16 items, instead of the proposed 25, were relevant in measuring consumer awareness. Product knowledge, bargain hunting and information search were each measured by four items, whilst general consumer knowledge and price consciousness were each measured by two items. The other nine items were shown to be of no value. Practical/managerial implications: The study recommends that marketers and policymakers in developing and transition economies, such as Zimbabwe, consider these five dimensions when conducting consumer awareness research or when planning consumer awareness programmes. Contribution/value-add: The study provided evidence that the dimensionality of the construct of consumer awareness does not change as the socio-economic and political environments change. However, items used to measure the dimensions need to be updated from time to time

    An Assessment of Reliability and Validity of the Attitudinal and Behavioural Typology of Customer Loyalty in a Developing Country: Evidence from Zimbabwe

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    Considerable attention has been given to the construct of customer loyalty in marketing practice and research. However, this construct remains relatively unexplored. Its measurement has generated substantial debate and confusion. The introduction of the attitudinal and behavioural approach to the measurement of customer loyalty has managed to bring marketing minds together. And yet, there is a dearth of empirical evidence on the reliability and validity of this approach. This study, therefore, sought to assess the reliability and validity of the attitudinal and behavioural typology of customer loyalty in Zimbabwe, a developing country. The study took a cross-section of 400 consumers in two major cities (Harare and Bulawayo) in Zimbabwe. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Consumers were randomly intercepted while shopping in major supermarkets. A measurement model was developed and validated using structural equation modelling in AMOS 21. The study established that the attitudinal and behavioural typology is a reliable and valid measure of customer loyalty. Thus, the attitudinal and behavioural typology of customer loyalty is applicable in developing countries such as Zimbabwe. Marketing practitioners and researchers in developing countries are, therefore, recommended to consider both attitudinal and behavioural components when planning customer loyalty programmes and conducting consumer research

    Consumer Awareness, Ethnocentrism and Loyalty: An Intergative Model

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    This article examines the relationships among consumer awareness, ethnocentrism, and loyalty toward imported poultry meat products. Four hundred consumers were randomly intercepted while shopping in major supermarkets using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. The structural equation modeling technique was used to test the integrative model. The results show that consumer awareness positively influences consumer ethnocentrism, while consumer awareness does not influence consumer loyalty. The results also reveal that consumer ethnocentrism negatively influences consumer loyalty. It is recommended that marketers consider consumer awareness, ethnocentrism, and loyalty when designing marketing programs in developing countries such as Zimbabwe. Poultry marketers are advised to offer quality products accompanied by aggressive promotions to improve their image. Foreign poultry marketers should also consider setting up manufacturing facilities in developing countries such as Zimbabwe so that their products may be viewed as appropriate and contributing to the development of these economies

    Examining the measurement and dimensionality of the construct of consumer awareness in a developing and transition economy

    No full text
    Orientation: Literature suggests that major political and socio-economic transformations may influence the measurement and dimensionality of consumer awareness. Research purpose: The study examined the measurement and dimensionality of the construct of consumer awareness after transformation in the political and socio-economic environments in Zimbabwe. Motivation for the study: There is a dearth of research to validate whether or not the measurement and dimensionality of the construct of consumer awareness changes as the environment changes. Research design, approach and method: Data were collected from a cross-section of 305 consumers using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Consumers were intercepted at shopping malls. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse data. Main findings: The study confirmed that consumer awareness comprises five dimensions, namely product knowledge, bargain hunting, general consumer knowledge, price consciousness and information search. However, the study found that only 16 items, instead of the proposed 25, were relevant in measuring consumer awareness. Product knowledge, bargain hunting and information search were each measured by four items, whilst general consumer knowledge and price consciousness were each measured by two items. The other nine items were shown to be of no value. Practical/managerial implications: The study recommends that marketers and policymakers in developing and transition economies, such as Zimbabwe, consider these five dimensions when conducting consumer awareness research or when planning consumer awareness programmes. Contribution/value-add: The study provided evidence that the dimensionality of the construct of consumer awareness does not change as the socio-economic and political environments change. However, items used to measure the dimensions need to be updated from time to time

    An Assessment of Reliability and Validity of the Attitudinal and Behavioural Typology of Customer Loyalty in a Developing Country: Evidence from Zimbabwe

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    Considerable attention has been given to the construct of customer loyalty in marketing practice and research. However, this construct remains relatively unexplored. Its measurement has generated substantial debate and confusion. The introduction of the attitudinal and behavioural approach to the measurement of customer loyalty has managed to bring marketing minds together. And yet, there is a dearth of empirical evidence on the reliability and validity of this approach. This study, therefore, sought to assess the reliability and validity of the attitudinal and behavioural typology of customer loyalty in Zimbabwe, a developing country. The study took a cross-section of 400 consumers in two major cities (Harare and Bulawayo) in Zimbabwe. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Consumers were randomly intercepted while shopping in major supermarkets. A measurement model was developed and validated using structural equation modelling in AMOS 21. The study established that the attitudinal and behavioural typology is a reliable and valid measure of customer loyalty. Thus, the attitudinal and behavioural typology of customer loyalty is applicable in developing countries such as Zimbabwe. Marketing practitioners and researchers in developing countries are, therefore, recommended to consider both attitudinal and behavioural components when planning customer loyalty programmes and conducting consumer research. DOI: 10.5901/mjss.2015.v6n1s1p31
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