193 research outputs found

    Effective or expedient: Market devices and philanthropic techniques

    No full text
    Advocates of philanthropy often frame its worth through efficacy. Critical voices counter such narratives by exposing the social construction of these ideas by hegemonic forces. But they do not interrogate concepts of efficacy through close attention to the process of doing philanthropy. To address this gap, this article engages with philanthropy through the anthropology of techniques. Based on three months of participant observation among high-net-worth donors and organizations that work with them in the City of London, I argue that attention to expedience (here referring to maximizing funding rather than effects) invigorates critical reflection on “effective philanthropy.” Furthermore, I suggest that my ethnographically informed distinction between expedience and efficacy provides me with a new way to engage with philanthropists: demonstrating the relevance of anthropological theory to their practices and concerns rather than simply criticizing them

    Addressing the Humanitarian and Environmental Consequences of Atmospheric Nuclear Weapon Tests: A Case Study of UK and US Test Programs at Kiritimati (Christmas) and Malden Islands, Republic of Kiribati

    No full text
    Between 1957 and 1962, the UK and USA conducted 33 atmospheric nuclear weapons test detonations at or close to Malden and Kiritimati (Christmas) Islands (total yield 31 megatons), formerly British colonial territories in the central Pacific region, now part of the Republic of Kiribati. Some 40,000 British, Fijian, New Zealand and US civilian and military personnel participated in the test program and 500 i-Kiribati civilians lived on Kiritimati at the time. This article reviews humanitarian and environmental consequences of the UK and US nuclear weapons testing programs in Kiribati, as well as the policy measures that have addressed them. The authors contend that policy interventions to date have not adequately addressed the needs and rights of test survivors, nor ongoing environmental concerns. They argue that the victim assistance and environmental remediation obligations in the 2017 Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons offer an important new opportunity for addressing the consequences of nuclear detonations in Kiribati, by focusing policy attention and constituting a new field of development assistance

    Revisiting UK Marine Protected Areas governance: A case study of a collaborative approach to management of an English MPA

    No full text
    This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Wiley via the DOI in this recordCase studies of Marine Protected Area (MPA) upscaling were solicited from participants of a workshop at the International Marine Protected Areas Conference held in Autumn 2013 in Marseille. One such case study was Solandt, Jones, Duval‐Diop, Kleiven, and Frangoudes (2014; Governance challenges in scaling up from individual MPAs to MPA networks. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 24, 145–152) which illustrated the role of science, non‐governmental organizations, government and local regulators in applying systemic management measures for local MPAs based on risk, highlighting the importance of balancing top‐down and bottom‐up drivers. Here we follow up on the UK example, illustrating the incentives and actors involved in developing centralized and subsequent fisheries management measures in UK waters. Forty local laws were created to protect features in 143 inshore MPAs between 2013 and 2019. We illustrate best practice in delivering management, focusing on multiple practitioner involvement in a single MPA and the monitoring put in place after trawling and dredging were banned. We reflect on how the governance mechanisms in place in English inshore waters can be used as a template to allow for progressive MPA management in other coastal states.Marine Conservation SocietyPigShed TrustPrincess Yacht

    A modern guide to quantitative spectroscopy of massive OB stars

    Full text link
    Quantitative spectroscopy is a powerful technique from which we can extract information about the physical properties and surface chemical composition of stars. In this chapter, I guide the reader through the main ideas required to get initiated in the learning process to become an expert in the application of state-of-the-art quantitative spectroscopic techniques to the study of massive OB stars. NB: This chapter is intended to serve to young students as a first approach to a field which has attracted my attention during the last 20 years. I should note that, despite its importance, at present, the number of real experts in the field around the world is limited to less than 50 people, and about one third of them are close to retirement. Hence, I consider that this is a good moment to write a summary text on the subject to serve as guideline for the next generations of students interested in joining the massive star crew. If you are one of them, please, use this chapter as a first working notebook. Do not stop here. Dig also, for further details, into the literature I quote along the text. And, once there, dig even deeper to find all the original sources explaining in more detail the physical and technical concepts that are presently incorporated into our modern (almost) automatized tools.Comment: Accepted for publication in the book "Reviews in Frontiers of Modern Astrophysics: From Space Debris to Cosmology" (eds Kabath, Jones and Skarka; publisher Springer Nature) funded by the European Union Erasmus+ Strategic Partnership grant "Per Aspera Ad Astra Simul" 2017-1-CZ01-KA203-03556

    Unsettled Care: Temporality, Subjectivity, and the Uneasy Ethics of Care

    No full text
    In this introduction, and indeed this special section, we explore care as a morally ambiguous and relationally unstable set of practices. By exploring care over longer temporal frames and across shifting subjectivities and intersubjectivities, we show how enactments of care are often unsettled by the transforming dynamics of relationships across time and often entail a multiplicity of competing affects and aspirations, such as hope and failure, love and resentment, pragmatism and utopianism, and connection and disconnection. We thus suggest an analytic approach to care that questions care as either morally suspect or morally virtuous and instead allows for the compromised, shifting, and ambiguous dimensions of care practices to take center stage. [care, anthropology, temporality, subjectivity

    The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey

    No full text
    The Tarantula Survey is an ambitious ESO Large Programme that has obtained multi-epoch spectroscopy of over 1,000 massive stars in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Here we introduce the scientific motivations of the survey and give an overview of the observational sample. Ultimately, quantitative analysis of every star, paying particular attention to the effects of rotational mixing and binarity, will be used to address fundamental questions in both stellar and cluster evolution

    Evaluation of child-friendly augmented reality tool for patient-centered education in radiology and bone reconstruction

    No full text
    The use of augmented reality (AR) has a rich history and is used in a number of fields. Its application in healthcare and anatomy education is developing considerable interest. However, although its popularity is on the rise, its use as an educational and practical tool has not been sufficiently evaluated, especially with children. Therefore, this study presents the design, development and evaluation of an educational tablet-based application with AR functionality for children. A distal radius fracture was chosen, as it is one of the more common fractures in the younger age group. Following a standardized software engineering methodology, we identified functional and non-functional requirements, creating a child-friendly tablet based AR application. This used industry standard software and incorporated three-dimensional models of a buckle fracture, object and image target marker recognition, interactivity and educational elements. In addition, we surveyed children at the Glasgow Science Centre on its usability, design and educational effectiveness. Seventy-one children completed a questionnaire (25 also underwent a short structured interview). Overall, the feedback was positive relating to entertainment value, graphic design, usability and educational scope of the application. Notably, it was shown to increase user understanding of radiology across all age groups following a trial of the application. This study shows the great potential of using digital technologies, and more particularly augmented information, in engaging future generations in science from a young age. Creation of educational materials using digital technologies, and evaluating its effectiveness, highlights the great scope novel technology could have in anatomical education and training

    From Story to Science: The Contribution of Reading Fiction and Hybrid Stories to Conceptual Change with Young Children

    No full text
    WOS: 000478898800005This quasi-experimental study with 34 preschoolers explores how fictional and hybrid storybooks contribute to conceptual changes in preschoolers' understanding of lunar concepts. Interviews and children's drawings before and after reading sessions provided the data. Findings revealed that (i) young children have intuitive knowledge and alternative explanations from their experiences and lay culture, (ii) storybook messages and illustrations cause misconceptions and (iii) hybrid stories increase protoscientific explanations among children of both genders. Combining accurate scientific information and enjoyable context makes hybrid storybooks effective edutainment for preschoolers.Ahi Evran University Scientific Research Projects Coordination UnitAhi Evran University [EGT.A4.18.020]The study was supported by the Ahi Evran University Scientific Research Projects Coordination Unit. Project number: EGT.A4.18.020

    Digital me, digital us: curious, critical & creative pilot project evaluation report

    Full text link
    This evaluation reports on a new educational program focused on developing digital literacies and digital citizenship in year 7 students in the state of Victoria. The program is innovative in that it aims to develop both critical thinking skills and digital literacies to help young people recognise and oppose harmful and divisive content online, including radicalisation to violence. In cultivating critical and agentic practices for young people, the program focuses on identifying and understanding the nature of digital identities and practices online. The program also explores the protective factors that the online context can provide in the form of social connection and community

    Attunement: Rethinking Responsibility

    No full text
    In this essay I consider the relation between ontological starting points, harm reduction, and responsibilization. I begin with a brief discussion of the dominant “modern form of ontology” and its relation to familiar notions of morality and biopolitics. I then consider what I call the typical model of harm reduction as an illustration of the enactment of this ontology and how this results in what we call responsibilization. I then briefly and critically engage a recent and influential alternative ontology offered by a prominent social theorist, and consider its shortcomings in taking up a Levinasian conception of responsibility. Finally, and in response to this critique, I turn to the unique case of Vancouver, Canada and the enactment of what I call a politics of world-building, through which political agonists are in the process of creating a new world characterized as attuned with itself
    corecore