615 research outputs found

    Experimental evidence of the effect of nuclear shells on fission dissipation and time

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    International audienceNuclear fission is still one of the most complex physical processes we can observe in nature due to the interplay of macroscopic and microscopic nuclear properties that decide the result. An example of this coupling is the presence of nuclear dissipation as an important ingredient that contributes to drive the dynamics and has a clear impact on the time of the process. However, different theoretical interpretations, and scarce experimental data make it poorly understood. In this Letter, we present the first experimental determination of the dissipation energy in fission as a function of the fragment split, for three different fissioning systems. The amount of dissipation was obtained through the measurement of the relative production of fragments with even and odd atomic numbers with respect to different initial fission energies. The results reveal a clear effect of particular nuclear shells on the dissipation and fission dynamics. In addition, the relative production of fragments with even and odd atomic numbers appears as a potential contributor to the long-standing problem of the time scale in fission

    Corrigendum: “Measurement of ⁷³Ge(n,Îł) cross sections and implications for stellar nucleosynthesis” [Phys. Lett. B 790 (2019) 458–465]

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    Experimental evidence of the effect of nuclear shells on fission dissipation and time

    No full text
    International audienceNuclear fission is still one of the most complex physical processes we can observe in nature due to the interplay of macroscopic and microscopic nuclear properties that decide the result. An example of this coupling is the presence of nuclear dissipation as an important ingredient that contributes to drive the dynamics and has a clear impact on the time of the process. However, different theoretical interpretations, and scarce experimental data make it poorly understood. In this Letter, we present the first experimental determination of the dissipation energy in fission as a function of the fragment split, for three different fissioning systems. The amount of dissipation was obtained through the measurement of the relative production of fragments with even and odd atomic numbers with respect to different initial fission energies. The results reveal a clear effect of particular nuclear shells on the dissipation and fission dynamics. In addition, the relative production of fragments with even and odd atomic numbers appears as a potential contributor to the long-standing problem of the time scale in fission

    Neutron capture and total cross-section measurements on

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    Capture and total cross section measurements for 94,95,96Mo have been performed at the neutron time-of-flight facilities, n_TOF at CERN and GELINA at JRC-Geel. The measurements were performed using isotopically enriched samples with an enrichment above 95% for each of the 94,95,96Mo isotopes. The capture measurements were performed at n_TOF using C6D6 detectors and a new sTED detector. The transmission measurements were performed at a 10 m station of GELINA using a 6Li glass neutron detector. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections of <math><mmultiscripts><mi>Th</mi><mprescripts/><none/><mn>232</mn></mmultiscripts></math> and <math><mmultiscripts><mi mathvariant="normal">U</mi><mprescripts/><none/><mn>233</mn></mmultiscripts></math> up to 1 GeV using parallel plate avalanche counters at the CERN n_TOF facility

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    International audienceThe neutron-induced fission cross sections of Th232 and U233 were measured relative to U235 in a wide neutron energy range up to 1 GeV (and from fission threshold in the case of Th232, and from 0.7 eV in case of U233), using the white-spectrum neutron source at the CERN Neutron Time-of-Flight (n_TOF) facility. Parallel plate avalanche counters (PPACs) were used, installed at the Experimental Area 1 (EAR1), which is located at 185 m from the neutron spallation target. The anisotropic emission of fission fragments were taken into account in the detection efficiency by using, in the case of U233, previous results available in EXFOR, whereas in the case of Th232 these data were obtained from our measurement, using PPACs and targets tilted 45∘ with respect to the neutron beam direction. Finally, the obtained results are compared with past measurements and major evaluated nuclear data libraries. Calculations using the high-energy reaction models INCL++ and ABLA07 were performed and some of their parameters were modified to reproduce the experimental results. At high energies, where no other neutron data exist, our results are compared with experimental data on proton-induced fission. Moreover, the dependence of the fission cross section at 1 GeV with the fissility parameter of the target nucleus is studied by combining those (p,f) data with our (n,f) data on Th232 and U233 and on other isotopes studied earlier at n_TOF using the same experimental setup

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections of Th 232 and U 233 up to 1 GeV using parallel plate avalanche counters at the CERN n_TOF facility

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    The neutron-induced fission cross sections of 232^{232}Th and 233^{233}U were measured relative to 235^{235}U in a wide neutron energy range up to 1 GeV (and from fission threshold in the case of 232^{232}Th, and from 0.7 eV in case of 233^{233}U), using the white-spectrum neutron source at the CERN Neutron Time-of-Flight (n_TOF) facility. Parallel plate avalanche counters (PPACs) were used, installed at the Experimental Area 1 (EAR1), which is located at 185 m from the neutron spallation target. The anisotropic emission of fission fragments were taken into account in the detection efficiency by using, in the case of 233^{233}U, previous results available in EXFOR, whereas in the case of 232^{232}Th these data were obtained from our measurement, using PPACs and targets tilted 45∘ with respect to the neutron beam direction. Finally, the obtained results are compared with past measurements and major evaluated nuclear data libraries. Calculations using the high-energy reaction models INCL++ and ABLA07 were performed and some of their parameters were modified to reproduce the experimental results. At high energies, where no other neutron data exist, our results are compared with experimental data on proton-induced fission. Moreover, the dependence of the fission cross section at 1 GeV with the fissility parameter of the target nucleus is studied by combining those (p,f) data with our (n,f) data on 232^{232}Th and 233^{233}U and on other isotopes studied earlier at n_TOF using the same experimental setup

    Systematic study of Δ\Delta(1232) resonance excitations using single isobaric charge-exchange reactions induced by medium-mass projectiles of Sn

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    The fragment separator FRS has been used for the first time to measure the (n,p)- and (p,n)-type isobaric charge-exchange cross sections of stable Sn112,124 isotopes accelerated at 1A GeV with an uncertainty of 3% and to separate quasielastic and inelastic components in the missing-energy spectra of the ejectiles. The inelastic contribution can be associated to the excitation of isobar Δ(1232) resonances and to the pion emission in s wave, in both the target and projectile nuclei, while the quasielastic contribution is associated with the nuclear spin-isospin response of nucleon-hole excitations. The data lead to interesting results, where we observe a clear quenching of the quasielastic component, and their comparisons to theoretical calculations demonstrate that the baryonic resonances can be excited in the target and projectile nuclei. To go further in this investigation, we propose to study the excitation of baryonic resonances, taking advantage of the combination of high-resolving power magnetic spectrometers with the Wide Angle Shower Apparatus (WASA) calorimeter. These new measurements will allow us to determine the momenta of the ejectiles and pions emitted in coincidence after the single isobaric charge-exchange collisions, providing us unique opportunities to study the evolution of the baryonic resonance dynamics with the neutron-proton asymmetry through the use of exotic radioactive ion beams

    Zr 92 (n,g) and (n,tot) measurements at the GELINA and n_TOF facilities

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    Progress from ASDEX Upgrade experiments in preparing the physics basis of ITER operation and DEMO scenario development

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    Fission-fragment yields measured in Coulomb-induced fission of

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    Low energy fission of 234,235,236,238U and 237,238Np radioactive beams, provided by the GSI/FRS facility, has been studied using the R3B/SOFIA setup. The latter allows, on an event-by-event basis, to simultaneously identify, in terms of their mass and atomic numbers, the fissioning nucleus in coincidence with both fission fragments after prompt-neutron emission. This presentation reports on new results on elemental, isobaric and isotopic yields
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