30 research outputs found

    'The Dignity that May Clothe a Tradesman's Life': Joseph Mayer and Antiquarian Patronage in Nineteenth-Century England

    No full text
    The nineteenth century saw an influx of men of trade into English antiquarian circles, a development that caused significant consternation among those who were accustomed to gathering in more rarefied spaces. However, devoting one’s life to scholarship was not inexpensive, and these self-made scholars were often left scrambling to find reliable sources of income on which to live. This essay reconsiders the intersection between class and scholarship especially among Anglo-Saxonists, by examining the life of Joseph Mayer (d. 1886), a Liverpool jeweller and silversmith, who is best known as a collector of antiquities and the co-founder of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire (1848). This essay explores the sources of Mayer’s growing wealth, the objectives of his investment in antiquities and the extent of his involvement in antiquarian societies in Liverpool, London, and abroad. We conclude that his identity as a tradesman was never fully erased by either his fortune or his scholarly contributions. We contend that an overlooked part of Mayer’s legacy is his patronage of middle-class scholars such as Charles Roach Smith, Thomas Wright, Frederick Fairholt, Joseph Pulzsky and Eliza Meteyard, each of whom helped document his collections but also counted upon his largesse. However, the dangers of relying on a private patron became apparent when Mayer’s interests changed later in life; the fact that so few other forms of support existed for scholars of modest background meant that many faced considerable challenges in finding financial stability in their final years

    Inscribed in the Book of Life: Liturgical Commemoration in Merovingian Gaul

    Get PDF
    The present chapter discusses the ritual of reciting names in the public performance of the Merovingian mass and studies the prayers accompanying this ritual based on sources dating to the late seventh and early eighth centuries. This study focuses on how membership of the Christian community was defined and, more specifically, on the composition of the liturgical assembly that gathered on Sundays and feasts for the public celebration of mass. The effort to create and strengthen the idea of membership in and belonging to the Christian community in this complex time of great change was not marked by the development and consequent use of an entirely new vocabulary, but rather by the reuse of existing terminology, derived from ancient and biblical discourse concerned with citizenship and belonging. The public celebration of the cult is one of the loci in which this vocabulary was filled with new, sometimes radically changed, meanings

    Inscribed in the Book of Life: Liturgical Commemoration in Merovingian Gaul

    No full text
    The present chapter discusses the ritual of reciting names in the public performance of the Merovingian mass and studies the prayers accompanying this ritual based on sources dating to the late seventh and early eighth centuries. This study focuses on how membership of the Christian community was defined and, more specifically, on the composition of the liturgical assembly that gathered on Sundays and feasts for the public celebration of mass. The effort to create and strengthen the idea of membership in and belonging to the Christian community in this complex time of great change was not marked by the development and consequent use of an entirely new vocabulary, but rather by the reuse of existing terminology, derived from ancient and biblical discourse concerned with citizenship and belonging. The public celebration of the cult is one of the loci in which this vocabulary was filled with new, sometimes radically changed, meanings

    Bodily Objects: Encounters with Material Culture

    No full text

    Berber genealogy and the politics of prehistoric archaeology and craniology in French Algeria (1860s–1880s)

    Get PDF
    Following the conquest of Algiers and its surrounding territory by the French army in 1830, officers noted an abundance of standing stones in this region of North Africa. Although they attracted considerably less attention among their cohort than more familiar Roman monuments such as triumphal arches and bridges, these prehistoric remains were similar to formations found in Brittany and other parts of France. The first effort to document these remains occurred in 1863, when Laurent-Charles FĂ©raud, a French army interpreter, recorded thousands of dolmens and stone formations south-west of Constantine. Alleging that these constructions were Gallic, FĂ©raud hypothesized the close affinity of the French, who claimed descent from the ancient Gauls, with the early inhabitants of North Africa. After FĂ©raud's claims met with scepticism among many prehistorians, French scholars argued that these remains were constructed by the ancestors of the Berbers (Kabyles in contemporary parlance), whom they hypothesized had been dominated by a blond race of European origin. Using craniometric statistics of human remains found in the vicinity of the standing stones to propose a genealogy of the Kabyles, French administrators in Algeria thereafter suggested that their mixed origins allowed them to adapt more easily than the Arab population to French colonial governance. This case study at the intersection of prehistoric archaeology, ancient history and craniology exposes how genealogical (and racial) classification made signal contributions to French colonial ideology and policy between the 1860s and 1880s

    The Enduring Attraction of the Pirenne Thesis

    Get PDF

    Séjour de longue durée au CESCM pour un couple de chercheurs finlandais

    No full text
    Marika Rasanen et Teemu Immonen sont Finlandais. Ils nous viennent de l’Université de Turku et sont en séjour de recherche au CESCM pour 18 mois, sur invitation d'Éric Palazzo. Cliché J.-P. Brouard (CESCM) Marika, Teemu, could you please tell us about your teaching and research activities? Teemu: My background is in the study of late medieval monastic history and the cult of saints. More recently, I have concentrated on the Golden Age of Monte Cassino under Abbot Desiderius (d. 1087) and the..

    Museum-building in nineteenth-century Algeria

    Get PDF

    Another history of museums: from the discourse to the museum-piece

    No full text
    The history of museums could get inspired on the procedures of material studies and of Anthropology in order to take a new stand and move away from the institutional approach and consider the approach of objects traditionally labelled as museum objects. The socalled “museum pieces” are supposed to have a number of characteristics, particularly some great historical and artistic qualities, sometimes an heritage quality, but above all the ability to make “friends” around the community or around the world. In all these respects, it is proposed here a number of research procedures that may supplement or enrich the directions usually assigned to the history of institutions
    corecore