97 research outputs found

    The Role of Precedents on Court Delay - Evidence from a civil law country

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    Court delay frustrates economic behavior. Surprisingly, the impact of a coherent jurisdiction for the timely resolution of legal disputes has so far received little attention in civil law countries. Consequently, this paper examines the nexus between court delay and the availability of legal precedents. We model litigation as a two-stage rent seeking game, and find that precedents curb strategic behavior. Thus, the excessive use of party resources in litigation, such as time, is reduced if a precedent is applicable. Using judge-level data of a German trial court, we provide first empirical evidence on the role of precedents for case disposition time and the probability of reversal in a civil law country. Our results show that the availability of precedents significantly contributes to a reduction in delay, and also decreases the probability of reversal. Interestingly, we find no such influence for the citation of legal literature in verdicts

    The Role of Precedents on Court Delay - Evidence from a civil law country

    Get PDF
    Court delay frustrates economic behavior. Surprisingly, the impact of a coherent jurisdiction for the timely resolution of legal disputes has so far received little attention in civil law countries. Consequently, this paper examines the nexus between court delay and the availability of legal precedents. We model litigation as a two-stage rent seeking game, and find that precedents curb strategic behavior. Thus, the excessive use of party resources in litigation, such as time, is reduced if a precedent is applicable. Using judge-level data of a German trial court, we provide first empirical evidence on the role of precedents for case disposition time and the probability of reversal in a civil law country. Our results show that the availability of precedents significantly contributes to a reduction in delay, and also decreases the probability of reversal. Interestingly, we find no such influence for the citation of legal literature in verdicts

    Global reversal, regional revival?

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    Regional Studies celebrates its 50th anniversary with this special issue. This introductory article reflects back on developments since the journal was started and offers signposts for urban and regional research looking ahead. It outlines the changing global context for regional studies and identifies some of the ways in which the need for regional research is enhanced by the extraordinary challenges currently confronting the world. It also introduces important themes from the recent history of the journal that are likely to feature in future. This is obviously a highly selective exercise, given the considerable breadth and depth of regional research over the years

    The 100 Most Influential Publications in Cervical Spine Research

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    STUDY DESIGN Bibliometric study of current literature. OBJECTIVE To identify and analyze the 100 most cited publications in cervical spine research. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA The cervical spine is a dynamic field of research with many advances made within the last century. However, the literature has never been comprehensively analyzed to identify and compare the most influential articles as measured by the number of citations. METHODS All databases of the Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge were utilized in a two-step approach. First, the 150 most cited cervical spine studies up to and including 2014 were identified using four keywords. Second, all keywords related to the cervical spine found in the 150 studies (n = 38) were used to conduct a second search of the database. The top 100 most cited articles were hereby selected for further analysis of current and past citations, authorship, geographic origin, article type, and level of evidence. RESULTS Total citations for the 100 studies identified ranged from 173 to 879. They were published in the time frame 1952 to 2008 in a total of 30 different journals. Most studies (n = 42) were published in the decade 1991 - 2000. Level of evidence ranged from 1 to 5 with 39 studies in the level 4 category. 13 researchers were first author more than once and 9 researchers senior author more than once. The two step approach with a secondary widening of search terms yielded an additional 27 studies, including the first ranking article. CONCLUSIONS This bibliometric study is likely to include some of the most important milestones in the field of cervical spine research of the last 100 years. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 3
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