4 research outputs found

    A 1.7GHz 31dBm differential CMOS Class-E Power Amplifier with 58% PAE

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    This paper shows that CMOS Class-E PAs are capable of high Power-Added Efficiency (PAE), even when delivering large output powers at Radio Frequency (RF). In particular, a cascode device is used to obtain high efficiency while assuring reliable operation. A differential solution has been adopted to maximize 2nd harmonic suppression and minimize potential on-chip interference. Prototypes realized in 0.13μm CMOS technology using thick oxide devices show the following performances: 31dBm maximum output power at 1.7GHz with 67% drain efficiency and 58% PAE, -51dBc and -39.5dBc suppression for 2nd and 3rd harmonics, respectively.This paper shows that CMOS Class-E PAs are capable of high Power-Added Efficiency (PAE), even when delivering large output powers at Radio Frequency (RF). In particular, a cascode device is used to obtain high efficiency while assuring reliable operation. A differential solution has been adopted to maximize 2nd harmonic suppression and minimize potential on-chip interference. Prototypes realized in 0.13mu;m CMOS technology using thick oxide devices show the following performances: 31dBm maximum output power at 1.7GHz with 67% drain efficiency and 58% PAE, -51dBc and -39.5dBc suppression for 2nd and 3rd harmonics, respectively

    A 30.5 dBm 48% PAE CMOS Class-E PA With Integrated Balun for RF Applications

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    FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION, FIRMWARE DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FLEX-SPI COMMUNICATION PROTOCOL: ENERGY CONSUMPTION ANALYSIS AND COMPARISON WITH I2C STANDARD

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    In this paper, we report a detailed description of developed Flex-SPI firmware structure together with experimental tests carried out by using ad-hoc instrumental setups based on TI MSP-EXP430F5438 experimenter boards. Developed framework, aimed to provide a solid base to test the possibility of performing a shared SPI communication with a fixed number of wires without renouncing to push-pull output stage advantages, has been implemented and successfully validated. Also, FlexSPI energy consumption has been evaluated and then compared with the I2C one, by proper experimental setups and related data processing: the two protocols, in fact, share several features, although they rely on a different hardware configuration. The energy/bit metric was chosen so that the two output stages can be compared regardless the effective quantity of exchanged packets; thus, this measure provides an indication of necessary energy amount to move a single bit to guarantee the correct firmware functionality. Despite larger quantity of exchanged data due to channel reservation needs (with a 35% traffic overhead, in the performed tests), the FlexSPI total energy consumption is comparable with the I2C one, at the same communication speed; thus a lower energy/bit requirement is required for FlexSPI protocol, decreasing with the negotiated speed, in this way proving FlexSPI protocol as a suited and valid choice for high-speed low-consumption communications inside embedded systems with a developed architecture capable of great flexibility

    Investigating Flow Dynamics with Wireless Pressure Sensors Network

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    Wireless sensors networks enable the chance to investigate with enhanced freedom physical phenomena, aiming to increase the informative content obtained by sensors measurements. In this work we will focus on a system allowing to experimentally measure pressure profiles obtained from sensor nodes deployed on a NACA0012 aircraft wing model. By exploiting measurements gathered from sensors, allowing to measure pressure fluctuations of ±600Pa with a resolution of 4Pa, together with results obtained by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models, the system enables extracting flow profile, thus obtaining information on flow separation and stall phenomenon. Wireless measures are delivered with an enhanced version of IEEE802.15.4e, allowing to decrease power consumption by a factor of 7. Packet routing, based on Routing Protocol for Low-Power and Lossy Networks (RPL), has been improved by means of a newly introduced Lifetime and Latency Aggregatable Metric (L2AM) leading to a 18% increased network lifetime
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