15 research outputs found

    Data-driven clustering of combined Functional Motor Disorders based on the Italian registry

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    Functional Motor Disorders (FMDs) represent nosological entities with no clear phenotypic characterization, especially in patients with multiple (combined FMDs) motor manifestations. A data-driven approach using cluster analysis of clinical data has been proposed as an analytic method to obtain non-hierarchical unbiased classifications. The study aimed to identify clinical subtypes of combined FMDs using a data-driven approach to overcome possible limits related to "a priori" classifications and clinical overlapping

    Understanding Factors Associated With Psychomotor Subtypes of Delirium in Older Inpatients With Dementia

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    Update on the Classification and Pathophysiological Mechanisms of Pediatric Cardiorenal Syndromes

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    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is defined as a disorder resulting from the abnormal interaction between the heart and kidney, in which acute or chronic dysfunction of one organ may lead to acute and/or chronic dysfunction of the other. The functional interplay between the heart and kidney is characterized by a complex bidirectional symbiotic interaction, regulated by a wide array of both genetic and environmental mechanisms. There are at least five known subtypes of CRS, based on the severity of clinical features and the degree of heart/renal failure. The fourth subtype (cardiorenal syndrome type 4 (CRS4)) is characterized by a primary chronic kidney disease (CKD), which in turn leads to a decreased cardiac function. Impairment of renal function is among the most important pathophysiological factors contributing to heart failure (HF) in the pediatric age group, and cardiovascular complications could be one of the most important causes of mortality in pediatric patients with advanced CKD. In this context, a loss of glomerular filtration rate directly correlates with both the progression of cardiovascular complications in CRS and the risk of HF. This review describes the interaction pathways between the heart and kidney and the recently identified pathophysiological mechanisms underlying pediatric CRS, with a special focus on CRS4, which encompasses both primary CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD)

    Diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations in adult dystonia: a joint document by the Italian Society of Neurology, the Italian Academy for the Study of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders, and the Italian Network on Botulinum Toxin

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    The diagnostic framework and the therapeutic management of patients with adult dystonia can represent a challenge for clinical neurologists. The objective of the present paper is to delineate diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations for dystonia provided by a panel of Italian experts afferent to the Italian Society of Neurology, the Italian Academy for the Study of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders, and the Italian Network on Botulinum Toxin. We first discuss the clinical approach and the instrumental assessment useful for diagnostic purpose. Then, we analyze the pharmacological, surgical, and rehabilitative therapeutic options for adult dystonia. Finally, we propose a hospital-territory network model for adult dystonia management

    Data-driven clustering of combined Functional Motor Disorders based on the Italian registry

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    Introduction: Functional Motor Disorders (FMDs) represent nosological entities with no clear phenotypic characterization, especially in patients with multiple (combined FMDs) motor manifestations. A data-driven approach using cluster analysis of clinical data has been proposed as an analytic method to obtain non-hierarchical unbiased classifications. The study aimed to identify clinical subtypes of combined FMDs using a data-driven approach to overcome possible limits related to "a priori" classifications and clinical overlapping. Methods: Data were obtained by the Italian Registry of Functional Motor Disorders. Patients identified with multiple or "combined" FMDs by standardized clinical assessments were selected to be analyzed. Non-hierarchical cluster analysis was performed based on FMDs phenomenology. Multivariate analysis was then performed after adjustment for principal confounding variables. Results: From a study population of n = 410 subjects with FMDs, we selected n = 188 subjects [women: 133 (70.7%); age: 47.9 ± 14.4 years; disease duration: 6.4 ± 7.7 years] presenting combined FMDs to be analyzed. Based on motor phenotype, two independent clusters were identified: Cluster C1 (n = 82; 43.6%) and Cluster C2 (n = 106; 56.4%). Cluster C1 was characterized by functional tremor plus parkinsonism as the main clinical phenotype. Cluster C2 mainly included subjects with functional weakness. Cluster C1 included older subjects suffering from anxiety who were more treated with botulinum toxin and antiepileptics. Cluster C2 included younger subjects referring to different associated symptoms, such as pain, headache, and visual disturbances, who were more treated with antidepressants. Conclusion: Using a data-driven approach of clinical data from the Italian registry, we differentiated clinical subtypes among combined FMDs to be validated by prospective studies

    "Delirium Day": A nationwide point prevalence study of delirium in older hospitalized patients using an easy standardized diagnostic tool

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    Background: To date, delirium prevalence in adult acute hospital populations has been estimated generally from pooled findings of single-center studies and/or among specific patient populations. Furthermore, the number of participants in these studies has not exceeded a few hundred. To overcome these limitations, we have determined, in a multicenter study, the prevalence of delirium over a single day among a large population of patients admitted to acute and rehabilitation hospital wards in Italy. Methods: This is a point prevalence study (called "Delirium Day") including 1867 older patients (aged 65 years or more) across 108 acute and 12 rehabilitation wards in Italian hospitals. Delirium was assessed on the same day in all patients using the 4AT, a validated and briefly administered tool which does not require training. We also collected data regarding motoric subtypes of delirium, functional and nutritional status, dementia, comorbidity, medications, feeding tubes, peripheral venous and urinary catheters, and physical restraints. Results: The mean sample age was 82.0 ± 7.5 years (58 % female). Overall, 429 patients (22.9 %) had delirium. Hypoactive was the commonest subtype (132/344 patients, 38.5 %), followed by mixed, hyperactive, and nonmotoric delirium. The prevalence was highest in Neurology (28.5 %) and Geriatrics (24.7 %), lowest in Rehabilitation (14.0 %), and intermediate in Orthopedic (20.6 %) and Internal Medicine wards (21.4 %). In a multivariable logistic regression, age (odds ratio [OR] 1.03, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.05), Activities of Daily Living dependence (OR 1.19, 95 % CI 1.12-1.27), dementia (OR 3.25, 95 % CI 2.41-4.38), malnutrition (OR 2.01, 95 % CI 1.29-3.14), and use of antipsychotics (OR 2.03, 95 % CI 1.45-2.82), feeding tubes (OR 2.51, 95 % CI 1.11-5.66), peripheral venous catheters (OR 1.41, 95 % CI 1.06-1.87), urinary catheters (OR 1.73, 95 % CI 1.30-2.29), and physical restraints (OR 1.84, 95 % CI 1.40-2.40) were associated with delirium. Admission to Neurology wards was also associated with delirium (OR 2.00, 95 % CI 1.29-3.14), while admission to other settings was not. Conclusions: Delirium occurred in more than one out of five patients in acute and rehabilitation hospital wards. Prevalence was highest in Neurology and lowest in Rehabilitation divisions. The "Delirium Day" project might become a useful method to assess delirium across hospital settings and a benchmarking platform for future surveys
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