14 research outputs found

    Distinctive Steady-State Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Responses to Passive Robotic Leg Exercise during Head-Up Tilt: A Pilot Study in Neurological Patients

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    Introduction: Robot-assisted tilt table therapy was proposed for early rehabilitation and mobilization of patients after diseases such as stroke. A robot-assisted tilt table with integrated passive robotic leg exercise (PE) mechanism has the potential to prevent orthostatic hypotension usually provoked by verticalization. In a previous study with rather young healthy subjects [average age: 25.1 ± 2.6 years (standard deviation)], we found that PE effect on the cardiovascular system depends on the verticalization angle of the robot-assisted tilt table. In the current study, we investigated in an older population of neurological patients (a) whether they show the same PE effects as younger healthy population on the cardiovascular system at different tilt angles, (b) whether changing the PE frequency (i.e., stepping speed) influences the PE effect on the cardiovascular system, (c) whether PE could prevent orthostatic hypotension, and finally, (d) whether PE effect is consistent from day to day.Methods: Heart rate (HR), and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (sBP, dBP) in response to PE at two different tilt angles (α = 20°, 60°) with three different PE frequencies (i.e., 0, 24, and 48 steps per minute) of 10 neurological patients [average age: 68.4 ± 13.5 years (standard deviation)] were measured on 2 consecutive days. Linear mixed models were used to develop statistical models and analyze the repeated measurements.Results: The models show that: PE significantly increased sBP and dBP but had no significant effect on HR. (a) Similar to healthy subjects the effect of PE on sBP was dependent on the tilt angle with higher tilt angles resulting in a higher increase. Head-up tilting alone significantly increased HR and dBP but resulted in a non-significant drop in sBP. PE, in general, had a more additive effect on increasing BP. (b) The effect of PE was not influenced by its speed. (c) Neither during head-up tilt alone nor in combination with PE did participants experience orthostatic hypotension. (d) The measurement day was not a statistically significant factor regarding the effects of verticalization and PE on the cardiovascular response.Conclusion: We provide evidence that PE can increase steady-state values of sBP and dBP in neurological patients during head-up tilt. Similar to healthy subjects the effect on sBP depends on the verticalization angle of the robot-assisted tilt table. PE might have the potential to prevent orthostatic hypotension, but as the amount of drop in BP in response to head-up tilting was not leading to orthostatic hypotension in our patients, we could neither conclude nor reject such a preventive compensatory effect. Furthermore, we found that changing the PE speed does not influence the steady-state cardiovascular response

    Ranking Based on Collaborative Feature Weighting Applied to the Recommendation of Research Papers

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    Current research on recommendation systems focuses on optimization and evaluation of the quality of ranked recommended results. One of the most common approaches used in digital paper libraries to present and recommend relevant search results, is ranking the papers based on their features. However, feature utility or relevance varies greatly from highly relevant to less relevant, and redundant. Departing from the existing recommendation systems, in which all item features are considered to be equally important, this study presents the initial development of an approach to feature weighting with the goal of obtaining a novel recommendation method in which features which are more effective have a higher contribution/weight to the ranking process. Furthermore, it focuses on obtaining ranking of results returned by a query through a collaborative weighting procedure carried out by human users. The collaborative feature-weighting procedure is shown to be incremental, which in turn leads to an incremental approach to feature-based similarity evaluation. The obtained system is then evaluated using Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain (NDCG) with respect to a crowd-sourced ranked results. Comparison between the performance of the proposed and Ranking SVM methods shows that the overall ranking accuracy of the proposed approach outperforms the ranking accuracy of Ranking SVM method.ISSN:0975-900XISSN:0976-219

    Distinctive Steady-State Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Responses to Passive Robotic Leg Exercise during Head-Up Tilt: A Pilot Study in Neurological Patients

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    Introduction: Robot-assisted tilt table therapy was proposed for early rehabilitation and mobilization of patients after diseases such as stroke. A robot-assisted tilt table with integrated passive robotic leg exercise (PE) mechanism has the potential to prevent orthostatic hypotension usually provoked by verticalization. In a previous study with rather young healthy subjects [average age: 25.1 ± 2.6 years (standard deviation)], we found that PE effect on the cardiovascular system depends on the verticalization angle of the robot-assisted tilt table. In the current study, we investigated in an older population of neurological patients (a) whether they show the same PE effects as younger healthy population on the cardiovascular system at different tilt angles, (b) whether changing the PE frequency (i.e., stepping speed) influences the PE effect on the cardiovascular system, (c) whether PE could prevent orthostatic hypotension, and finally, (d) whether PE effect is consistent from day to day. Methods: Heart rate (HR), and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (sBP, dBP) in response to PE at two different tilt angles (α = 20°, 60°) with three different PE frequencies (i.e., 0, 24, and 48 steps per minute) of 10 neurological patients [average age: 68.4 ± 13.5 years (standard deviation)] were measured on 2 consecutive days. Linear mixed models were used to develop statistical models and analyze the repeated measurements. Results: The models show that: PE significantly increased sBP and dBP but had no significant effect on HR. (a) Similar to healthy subjects the effect of PE on sBP was dependent on the tilt angle with higher tilt angles resulting in a higher increase. Head-up tilting alone significantly increased HR and dBP but resulted in a non-significant drop in sBP. PE, in general, had a more additive effect on increasing BP. (b) The effect of PE was not influenced by its speed. (c) Neither during head-up tilt alone nor in combination with PE did participants experience orthostatic hypotension. (d) The measurement day was not a statistically significant factor regarding the effects of verticalization and PE on the cardiovascular response. Conclusion: We provide evidence that PE can increase steady-state values of sBP and dBP in neurological patients during head-up tilt. Similar to healthy subjects the effect on sBP depends on the verticalization angle of the robot-assisted tilt table. PE might have the potential to prevent orthostatic hypotension, but as the amount of drop in BP in response to head-up tilting was not leading to orthostatic hypotension in our patients, we could neither conclude nor reject such a preventive compensatory effect. Furthermore, we found that changing the PE speed does not influence the steady-state cardiovascular response.ISSN:1664-042

    Cardiovascular responses to antigravity muscle loading during head-down tilt at rest and after dynamic exerrcises

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    The physiological processes underlying hemodynamic homeostasis can be modulated by muscle activity and gravitational loading. The effects of antigravity muscle activity on cardiovascular regulation has been observed during orthostatic stress. Here, we evaluated such effects during head-down tilt (HDT). In this posture, the gravitational gradient along the body is different than in upright position, leading to increased central blood volume and reduced venous pooling. We compared the cardiovascular signals obtained with and without antigravity muscle loading during HDT in healthy human subjects, both at rest and during recovery from leg-press exercises. Further, we compared such cardiovascular responses to those obtained during upright position. We found that loading the antigravity muscles during HDT at rest led to significantly higher values of arterial blood pressure than without muscle loading, and restored systolic values to those observed during upright posture. Maintaining muscle loading post-exercise altered the short-term cardiovascular responses, but not the values of the signals five minutes after the exercise. These results demonstrate that antigravity muscle activity modulates cardiovascular regulation during HDT. This modulation should therefore be considered when interpreting cardiovascular responses to conditions that affect both gravity loading and muscle activity, for example bed rest or microgravity

    Cardiovascular responses to leg muscle loading during head-down tilt at rest and after dynamic exercises

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    The physiological processes underlying hemodynamic homeostasis can be modulated by muscle activity and gravitational loading. The effects of leg muscle activity on cardiovascular regulation have been observed during orthostatic stress. Here, we evaluated such effects during head-down tilt (HDT). In this posture, the gravitational gradient along the body is different than in upright position, leading to increased central blood volume and reduced venous pooling. We compared the cardiovascular signals obtained with and without leg muscle loading during HDT in healthy human subjects, both at rest and during recovery from leg-press exercises using a robotic device. Further, we compared such cardiovascular responses to those obtained during upright position. Loading leg muscles during HDT at rest led to significantly higher values of arterial blood pressure than without muscle loading, and restored systolic values to those observed during upright posture. Maintaining muscle loading post-exercise altered the short-term cardiovascular responses, but not the values of the signals five minutes after the exercise. These results suggest that leg muscle activity modulates cardiovascular regulation during HDT. This modulation should therefore be considered when interpreting cardiovascular responses to conditions that affect both gravity loading and muscle activity, for example bed rest or microgravity.ISSN:2045-232

    Ranking Based on Collaborative Feature Weighting Applied to the Recommendation of Research Papers

    No full text
    Current research on recommendation systems focuses on optimization and evaluation of the quality of ranked recommended results. One of the most common approaches used in digital paper libraries to present and recommend relevant search results, is ranking the papers based on their features. However, feature utility or relevance varies greatly from highly relevant to less relevant, and redundant. Departing from the existing recommendation systems, in which all item features are considered to be equally important, this study presents the initial development of an approach to feature weighting with the goal of obtaining a novel recommendation method in which features which are more effective have a higher contribution/weight to the ranking process. Furthermore, it focuses on obtaining ranking of results returned by a query through a collaborative weighting procedure carried out by human users. The collaborative feature-weighting procedure is shown to be incremental, which in turn leads to an incremental approach to feature-based similarity evaluation. The obtained system is then evaluated using Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain (NDCG) with respect to a crowd-sourced ranked results. Comparison between the performance of the proposed and Ranking SVM methods shows that the overall ranking accuracy of the proposed approach outperforms the ranking accuracy of Ranking SVM method

    Distinctive steady-state heart rate and blood pressure responses to passive robotic leg exercise and functional electrical stimulation during head-up tilt

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    Introduction: Tilt tables enable early mobilization of patients by providing verticalization. But there is a high risk of orthostatic hypotension provoked by verticalization, especially after neurological diseases such as spinal cord injury. Robot-assisted tilt tables might be an alternative as they add passive robotic leg exercise (PE) that can be enhanced with functional electrical stimulation (FES) to the verticalization, thus reducing the risk of orthostatic hypotension. We hypothesized that the influence of PE on the cardiovascular system during verticalization (i.e., head-up tilt) depends on the verticalization angle, and FES strengthens the PE influence. To test our hypotheses, we investigated the PE effects on the cardiovascular parameters heart rate (HR), and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (sBP, dBP) at different angles of verticalization in a healthy population. Methods: Ten healthy subjects on a robot-assisted tilt table underwent four different study protocols while HR, sBP, and dBP were measured: (1) head-up tilt to 60° and 71° without PE; (2) PE at 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt; (3) PE while constant FES intensity was applied to the leg muscles, at 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt; (4) PE with variation of the applied FES intensity at 0°, 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt. Linear mixed models were used to model changes in HR, sBP, and dBP responses. Results: The models show that: (1) head-up tilt alone resulted in statistically significant increases in HR and dBP, but no change in sBP. (2) PE during head-up tilt resulted in statistically significant changes in HR, sBP, and dBP, but not at each angle and not always in the same direction (i.e., increase or decrease of cardiovascular parameters). Neither adding (3) FES at constant intensity to PE nor (4) variation of FES intensity during PE had any statistically significant effects on the cardiovascular parameters. Conclusion: The effect of PE on the cardiovascular system during head-up tilt is strongly dependent on the verticalization angle. Therefore, we conclude that orthostatic hypotension cannot be prevented by PE alone, but that the preventive effect depends on the verticalization angle of the robot-assisted tilt table. FES (independent of intensity) is not an important contributing factor to the PE effect.ISSN:1664-042
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