20 research outputs found

    Facing Societal Challenges in Living Labs: Towards a Conceptual Framework to Facilitate Transdisciplinary Collaborations

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    Living labs are an extremely attractive open innovation landscape for collaborative research and development activities targeting the complexity of today’s societal challenges. However, although there is plenty of support for collaboration, we still lack clear guidelines to direct transdisciplinary stakeholder networks of academics and practitioners through collaboration processes in the living lab ecosystem. In other words, we lack answers to the question of “how to collaborate?” In the present paper we propose a conceptual framework defining relevant stages to initiate and facilitate transdisciplinary collaboration processes. We base our framework on collaboration challenges described in the literature, specifically the need for stakeholder alignment, as well as challenges experienced in practice, which we report through exploratory case studies. In the proposed conceptual framework, we advocate the application of co-creation methods, both at the level of the living lab (macro) and in projects (meso) within the living lab, in order to define, with all involved parties and stakeholders, the scope and strategy of the living lab and to facilitate stakeholder alignment. Additionally, we integrate an iterative approach and a feedback loop in order to account for the dynamic nature of the collaboration process and to enable reflection and evaluation

    A scoping review of digital tools to reduce sedentary behavior or increase physical activity in knowledge workers

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    Background: There is increasing interest in the role that technology can play in improving the vitality of knowledge workers. A promising and widely adopted strategy to attain this goal is to reduce sedentary behavior (SB) and increase physical activity (PA). In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art SB and PA interventions using technology in the office environment. By scoping the existing landscape, we identified current gaps and underexplored possibilities. We discuss opportunities for future development and research on SB and PA interventions using technology. Methods: A systematic search was conducted in the Association for Computing Machinery digital library, the interdisciplinary library Scopus, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Xplore Digital Library to locate peer-reviewed scientific articles detailing SB and PA technology interventions in office environments between 2009 and 2019. Results: The initial search identified 1130 articles, of which 45 studies were included in the analysis. Our scoping review focused on the technologies supporting the interventions, which were coded using a grounded approach. Conclusion: Our findings showed that current SB and PA interventions using technology provide limited possibilities for physically active ways of working as opposed to the common strategy of prompting breaks. Interventions are also often offered as additional systems or services, rather than integrated into existing office infrastructures. With this work, we have mapped different types of interventions and provide an increased understanding of the opportunities for future multidisciplinary development and research of technologies to address sedentary behavior and physical activity in the office context

    How Do Runners Experience Personalization of Their Training Scheme: The Inspirun E-Coach?

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    Among runners, there is a high drop-out rate due to injuries and loss of motivation. These runners often lack personalized guidance and support. While there is much potential for sports apps to act as (e-)coaches to help these runners to avoid injuries, set goals, and maintain good intentions, most available running apps primarily focus on persuasive design features like monitoring, they offer few or no features that support personalized guidance (e.g., personalized training schemes). Therefore, we give a detailed description of the working mechanism of Inspirun e-Coach app and on how this app uses a personalized coaching approach with automatic adaptation of training schemes based on biofeedback and GPS-data. We also share insights into how end-users experience this working mechanism. The primary conclusion of this study is that the working mechanism (if provided with accurate data) automatically adapts training sessions to the runners’ physical workload and stimulates runners’ goal perception, motivation, and experienced personalization. With this mechanism, we attempted to make optimal use of the potential of wearable technology to support the large group of novice or less experienced runners and that by providing insight in our working mechanisms, it can be applied in other technologies, wearables, and types of sport

    Breast cancer survivors’ experiences with an activity tracker integrated into a supervised exercise program: qualitative study

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    Background: There is growing evidence that physical activity is related to a better prognosis after a breast cancer diagnosis, whereas sedentary behavior is associated with worse outcomes. It is therefore important to stimulate physical activity and reduce sedentary time among patients with breast cancer. Activity trackers offer a new opportunity for interventions directed at stimulating physical activity behavior change. Objective: This study aimed to explore the experience of patients with breast cancer who used an activity tracker in addition to a supervised exercise intervention in the randomized UMBRELLA Fit trial. Methods: A total of 10 patients with breast cancer who completed cancer treatment participated in semistructured in-depth interviews about their experience with and suggestions for improvements for the Jawbone UP2 activity tracker. Results: The activity tracker motivated women to be physically active and created more awareness of their (sedentary) lifestyles. The women indicated that the automatically generated advice (received via the Jawbone UP app) lacked individualization and was not applicable to their personal situations (ie, having been treated for cancer). Furthermore, women felt that the daily step goal was one-dimensional, and they preferred to incorporate other physical activity goals. The activity tracker’s inability to measure strength exercises was a noted shortcoming. Finally, women valued personal feedback about the activity tracker from the physiotherapist. Conclusions: Wearing an activity tracker raised lifestyle awareness in patients with breast cancer. The women also reported additional needs not addressed by the system. Potential improvements include a more realistic total daily physical activity representation, personalized advice, and personalized goals

    Breast Cancer Survivors' Experiences With an Activity Tracker Integrated Into a Supervised Exercise Program : Qualitative Study

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    BACKGROUND: There is growing evidence that physical activity is related to a better prognosis after a breast cancer diagnosis, whereas sedentary behavior is associated with worse outcomes. It is therefore important to stimulate physical activity and reduce sedentary time among patients with breast cancer. Activity trackers offer a new opportunity for interventions directed at stimulating physical activity behavior change. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the experience of patients with breast cancer who used an activity tracker in addition to a supervised exercise intervention in the randomized UMBRELLA Fit trial. METHODS: A total of 10 patients with breast cancer who completed cancer treatment participated in semistructured in-depth interviews about their experience with and suggestions for improvements for the Jawbone UP2 activity tracker. RESULTS: The activity tracker motivated women to be physically active and created more awareness of their (sedentary) lifestyles. The women indicated that the automatically generated advice (received via the Jawbone UP app) lacked individualization and was not applicable to their personal situations (ie, having been treated for cancer). Furthermore, women felt that the daily step goal was one-dimensional, and they preferred to incorporate other physical activity goals. The activity tracker's inability to measure strength exercises was a noted shortcoming. Finally, women valued personal feedback about the activity tracker from the physiotherapist. CONCLUSIONS: Wearing an activity tracker raised lifestyle awareness in patients with breast cancer. The women also reported additional needs not addressed by the system. Potential improvements include a more realistic total daily physical activity representation, personalized advice, and personalized goals

    Integrating industrial design and Geoscience: a survey on data-driven research to promote public health and vitality

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    With the rapid advance of information communication technologies, unprecedented volumes of environmental and behavioral data have been generated and provided researchers with new pathways to develop strategies and interventions. In digital public health, there has been an emerging interest in promoting vitality based on multidisciplinary research. However, few works have been conducted on facilitating data-related collaboration in vitality research. This paper presents a survey study for the development of a data-driven service system to support multidisciplinary collaboration in vitality-related projects. Our survey received responses from 38 researchers, primarily from Industrial Design and Geoscience. From this survey, we learned both common ground and different research experiences between the two disciplines, regarding the collection, management, and analysis of data. Based on our findings, we proposed a system architecture of a data platform, and specified a set of functions that can assist researchers working from different disciplines in sharing, collection, processing, and analyzing vitality-related research data

    Dynamic benchmarking methodology for quality function deployment

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    10.1108/14635771011022307Benchmarking17127-43BQMT
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