164 research outputs found

    Phylogenomic analysis of a 55.1 kb 19-gene dataset resolves a monophyletic Fusarium that includes the Fusarium solani Species Complex

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    Scientific communication is facilitated by a data-driven, scientifically sound taxonomy that considers the end-user¬Ņs needs and established successful practice. In 2013, the Fusarium community voiced near unanimous support for a concept of Fusarium that represented a clade comprising all agriculturally and clinically important Fusarium species, including the F. solani species complex (FSSC). Subsequently, this concept was challenged in 2015 by one research group who proposed dividing the genus Fusarium into seven genera, including the FSSC described as members of the genus Neocosmospora, with subsequent justification in 2018 based on claims that the 2013 concept of Fusarium is polyphyletic. Here, we test this claim and provide a phylogeny based on exonic nucleotide sequences of 19 orthologous protein-coding genes that strongly support the monophyly of Fusarium including the FSSC. We reassert the practical and scientific argument in support of a genus Fusarium that includes the FSSC and several other basal lineages, consistent with the longstanding use of this name among plant pathologists, medical mycologists, quarantine officials, regulatory agencies, students, and researchers with a stake in its taxonomy. In recognition of this monophyly, 40 species described as genus Neocosmospora were recombined in genus Fusarium, and nine others were renamed Fusarium. Here the global Fusarium community voices strong support for the inclusion of the FSSC in Fusarium, as it remains the best scientific, nomenclatural, and practical taxonomic option availabl

    No to <i>Neocosmospora</i>: Phylogenomic and Practical Reasons for Continued Inclusion of the <i>Fusarium solani</i> Species Complex in the Genus <i>Fusarium</i>

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    ABSTRACT This article is to alert medical mycologists and infectious disease specialists of recent name changes of medically important species of the filamentous mold Fusarium. Fusarium species can cause localized and life-threating infections in humans. Of the 70 Fusarium species that have been reported to cause infections, close to one-third are members of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), and they collectively account for approximately two-thirds of all reported Fusarium infections. Many of these species were recently given scientific names for the first time by a research group in the Netherlands, but they were misplaced in the genus Neocosmospora. In this paper, we present genetic arguments that strongly support inclusion of the FSSC in Fusarium. There are potentially serious consequences associated with using the name Neocosmospora for Fusarium species because clinicians need to be aware that fusaria are broadly resistant to the spectrum of antifungals that are currently available

    Diversity of mobile genetic elements in the mitogenome of closely related Fusarium culmorum and F. graminearum sensu stricto strains ans its implication for diagnostic purposes

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    Much of the mitogenome variation observed in fungal lineages seems driven by mobile genetic elements (MGEs), which have invaded their genomes throughout evolution. The variation in the distribution and nucleotide diversity of these elements appears to be the main distinction between different fungal taxa, making them promising candidates for diagnostic purposes. Fungi of the genus Fusarium display a high variation in MGE content, from MGE-poor (F. oxysporum and Fusarium fujikuroi species complex) to MGE-rich mitogenomes found in the important cereal pathogens F. culmorum and F. graminearum sensu stricto. In this study, we investigated the MGE variation in these latter two species by mitogenome analysis of geographically diverse strains. In addition, a smaller set of F. cerealis and F. pseudograminearum strains was included for comparison. Forty-seven introns harboring from 0 to 3 endonucleases (HEGs) were identified in the standard set of mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Most of them belonged to the group I intron family and harbored either LAGLIDADG or GIY-YIG HEGs. Among a total of 53 HEGs, 27 were shared by all fungal strains. Most of the optional HEGs were irregularly distributed among fungal strains/species indicating ancestral mosaicism in MGEs. However, among optional MGEs, one exhibited species-specific conservation in F. culmorum. While in F. graminearum s.s. MGE patterns in cox3 and in the intergenic spacer between cox2 and nad4L may facilitate the identification of this species. Thus, our results demonstrate distinctive traits of mitogenomes for diagnostic purposes of Fusaria.Fil: Kulik, Tomasz. Department Of Botany And Nature Protection, University; PoloniaFil: Brankovics, Balazs. Wageningen Plant Research, Wageningen University; Pa√≠ses BajosFil: Van Diepeningen, Anne D.. Waneningen Plant Research; Pa√≠ses BajosFil: Bilska, Katarzyna. Department Of Botany And Nature Protection, University; PoloniaFil: Zelechowski, Maciej. Department Of Botany And Nature Protection, University; PoloniaFil: MyszczyŇĄski, Kamil. Department Of Botany And Nature Protection, University; PoloniaFil: Molcan, Tomasz. Faculty Of Biology And Biotechnology, University; PoloniaFil: Stakheev. Alexander. Institute Of Bioorganic Chemistry (ras); RusiaFil: Stenglein, Sebastian Alberto. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Centro Cientifico Tecnolol√≥gico Mar del Plata. Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Biotecnolog√≠a. Laboratorio de Biolog√≠a Funcional y Biotecnolog√≠a; ArgentinaFil: Beyer, Marco. Luxembourg Institute Of Science And Technology; LuxemburgoFil: Pasquali, Matias. Faculty Of Agricultural And Food Sciences; ItaliaFil: Sawicki, Jakub. Department Of Botany And Nature Protection, University; PoloniaFil: Baturo CieŇõniewska, Anna. Baturo-cie&#347;niewska; Poloni

    No to Neocosmospora: Phylogenomic and Practical Reasons for Continued Inclusion of the Fusarium solani Species Complex in the Genus Fusarium

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    This article is to alert medical mycologists and infectious disease specialists of recent name changes of medically important species of the Ô¨Ālamentous mold Fusarium. Fusarium species can cause localized and life-threating infections in humans. Of the 70 Fusarium species that have been reported to cause infections, close to one-third are members of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), and they collectively account for approximately two-thirds of all reported Fusarium infections. Many of these species were recently given scientiÔ¨Āc names for the Ô¨Ārst time by a research group in the Netherlands, but they were misplaced in the genus Neocosmospora. In this paper, we present genetic arguments that strongly support inclusion of the FSSC in Fusarium. There are potentially serious consequences associated with using the name Neocosmospora for Fusarium species because clinicians need to be aware that fusaria are broadly resistant to the spectrum of antifungals that are currently available

    Fusarium spp. in Loggerhead Sea Turtles (Caretta caretta): From Colonization to Infection

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    With the aim of evaluating the presence of Fusarium spp. in sea turtles with and without lesions and assessing the risk factors favoring colonization and/or infection, 74 loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) admitted to rescue and rehabilitation clinics in Italy were analyzed. The study compared 31 individuals with no apparent macroscopic lesions and 43 individuals with macroscopic lesions. Shell and skin samples were analyzed using Calcofluor white with 10% potassium hydroxide, standard histopathological examination, and fungal cultures. Fusarium spp. were isolated more frequently from animals with superficial lesions (39%) than from those with no macroscopic lesions (16%). Isolates from animals with superficial lesions were Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) lineages haplotypes 9, 12, and 27 (unnamed lineages), FSSC-2 (Fusarium keratoplasticum), Fusarium oxysporum (27%), and Fusarium brachygibbosum (3%). In contrast, only F. solani haplotypes 9 and 12 were isolated from animals with no macroscopic lesions. The presence of lesions was identified as a risk factor for the occurrence of Fusarium spp. Of the 74 animals, only 7 (9.5%) scored positive on microscopic examination with Calcofluor, and histological examination of those 7 animals revealed necrosis, inflammatory cells, and fungal hyphae in the carapace and skin. The results of this study suggest that fusariosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of shell and skin lesions in sea turtles. Direct examination using Calcofluor and potassium hydroxide was not useful to diagnose the infection. Histopathological examination and fungal culture should be performed to ensure correct treatment and infection control

    No to Neocosmospora: Phylogenomic and Practical Reasons for Continued Inclusion of the Fusarium solani Species Complex in the Genus Fusarium

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    Contains fulltext : 225984.pdf (publisher's version ) (Open Access)This article is to alert medical mycologists and infectious disease specialists of recent name changes of medically important species of the filamentous mold Fusarium Fusarium species can cause localized and life-threating infections in humans. Of the 70 Fusarium species that have been reported to cause infections, close to one-third are members of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), and they collectively account for approximately two-thirds of all reported Fusarium infections. Many of these species were recently given scientific names for the first time by a research group in the Netherlands, but they were misplaced in the genus Neocosmospora In this paper, we present genetic arguments that strongly support inclusion of the FSSC in Fusarium There are potentially serious consequences associated with using the name Neocosmospora for Fusarium species because clinicians need to be aware that fusaria are broadly resistant to the spectrum of antifungals that are currently available

    Phylogenomic analysis of a 55.1 kb 19-gene dataset resolves a monophyletic Fusarium that includes the Fusarium solani Species Complex

    No full text
    Scientific communication is facilitated by a data-driven, scientifically sound taxonomy that considers the end-user's needs and established successful practice. Previously (Geiser et al. 2013; Phytopathology 103:400-408. 2013), the Fusarium community voiced near unanimous support for a concept of Fusarium that represented a clade comprising all agriculturally and clinically important Fusarium species, including the F. solani Species Complex (FSSC). Subsequently, this concept was challenged by one research group (Lombard et al. 2015 Studies in Mycology 80: 189-245) who proposed dividing Fusarium into seven genera, including the FSSC as the genus Neocosmospora, with subsequent justification based on claims that the Geiser et al. (2013) concept of Fusarium is polyphyletic (Sandoval-Denis et al. 2018; Persoonia 41:109-129). Here we test this claim, and provide a phylogeny based on exonic nucleotide sequences of 19 orthologous protein-coding genes that strongly support the monophyly of Fusarium including the FSSC. We reassert the practical and scientific argument in support of a Fusarium that includes the FSSC and several other basal lineages, consistent with the longstanding use of this name among plant pathologists, medical mycologists, quarantine officials, regulatory agencies, students and researchers with a stake in its taxonomy. In recognition of this monophyly, 40 species recently described as Neocosmospora were recombined in Fusarium, and nine others were renamed Fusarium. Here the global Fusarium community voices strong support for the inclusion of the FSSC in Fusarium, as it remains the best scientific, nomenclatural and practical taxonomic option available

    Diversity of Mobile Genetic Elements in the Mitogenomes of Closely Related Fusarium culmorum and F. graminearum sensu stricto Strains and Its Implication for Diagnostic Purposes

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    Much of the mitogenome variation observed in fungal lineages seems driven by mobile genetic elements (MGEs), which have invaded their genomes throughout evolution. The variation in the distribution and nucleotide diversity of these elements appears to be the main distinction between different fungal taxa, making them promising candidates for diagnostic purposes. Fungi of the genus Fusarium display a high variation in MGE content, from MGE-poor (Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium fujikuroi species complex) to MGE-rich mitogenomes found in the important cereal pathogens F. culmorum and F. graminearum sensu stricto. In this study, we investigated the MGE variation in these latter two species by mitogenome analysis of geographically diverse strains. In addition, a smaller set of F. cerealis and F. pseudograminearum strains was included for comparison. Forty-seven introns harboring from 0 to 3 endonucleases (HEGs) were identified in the standard set of mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Most of them belonged to the group I intron family and harbored either LAGLIDADG or GIY-YIG HEGs. Among a total of 53 HEGs, 27 were shared by all fungal strains. Most of the optional HEGs were irregularly distributed among fungal strains/species indicating ancestral mosaicism in MGEs. However, among optional MGEs, one exhibited species-specific conservation in F. culmorum. While in F. graminearum s.s. MGE patterns in cox3 and in the intergenic spacer between cox2 and nad4L may facilitate the identification of this species. Thus, our results demonstrate distinctive traits of mitogenomes for diagnostic purposes of Fusaria

    No to Neocosmospora: Phylogenomic and Practical Reasons for Continued Inclusion of the Fusarium solani Species Complex in the Genus Fusarium.

    Get PDF
    This article is to alert medical mycologists and infectious disease specialists of recent name changes of medically important species of the filamentous mold Fusarium Fusarium species can cause localized and life-threating infections in humans. Of the 70 Fusarium species that have been reported to cause infections, close to one-third are members of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), and they collectively account for approximately two-thirds of all reported Fusarium infections. Many of these species were recently given scientific names for the first time by a research group in the Netherlands, but they were misplaced in the genus Neocosmospora In this paper, we present genetic arguments that strongly support inclusion of the FSSC in Fusarium There are potentially serious consequences associated with using the name Neocosmospora for Fusarium species because clinicians need to be aware that fusaria are broadly resistant to the spectrum of antifungals that are currently available

    Induction of biodeterioration on vegetables by three fungal species

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    The effect of three fungal species on the nutrient profile of onions and cucumbers was studied. The species identities of the fungal isolates were initially determined based on macro- and micro-morphological characters as well as molecular confirmation, using the internal transcribed spacer region. The isolates were confirmed as Neocosmospora ramosa (MG682504), Aspergillus tamarii (MG682505) and A. violaceofuscus (MG682503). We then used each fungus to induce biodeterioration and performed proximate analysis of nutrient breakdown. We also assayed each fungus for the production of mycotoxins and performed anti-fungal susceptibility tests using fluconazole and voriconazole. We found that N. ramosa facilitated the highest rate of biodeterioration for onions and cucumber. Our anti-fungal tests revealed that non-aflatoxigenic A. tamarii was susceptible to voriconazole, but resistant to fluconazole. A. violaceofuscus (also non-aflatoxigenic) was found to be susceptible to both anti-fungals, while N. ramosa was resistant to both the anti-fungals tested. This study underscores the ability of fungi to degrade vegetables, and the need to focus on intervention through both chemical and best practices.info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersio
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