714 research outputs found

    Non-motor effects of deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease motor subtypes

    No full text
    Introduction: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well-established treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) improving quality of life, motor, and non-motor symptoms. However, non-motor effects in PD subtypes are understudied. We hypothesized that patients with 'postural instability and gait difficulty' (PIGD) experience more beneficial non-motor effects than 'tremor-dominant' patients undergoing DBS for PD.Methods: In this prospective, observational, international multicentre study with a 6-month follow-up, we assessed the Non-Motor Symptom Scale (NMSS) as primary and the following secondary outcomes: Unified PD Rating Scale-motor examination (UPDRS-III), Scales for Outcomes in PD (SCOPA)-activities of daily living (ADL) and -motor complications, PDQuestionnaire-8 (PDQ-8), and levodopa-equivalent daily dose (LEDD). We analysed within-group longitudinal changes with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple comparisons. Additionally, we explored outcome between-group differences of motor subtypes with Mann-Whitney U-tests.Results: In 82 PIGD and 33 tremor-dominant patients included in this study, baseline NMSS total scores were worse in PIGD patients, both groups experienced postoperative improvements of the NMSS sleep/fatigue domain, and between-group differences in postoperative outcomes were favourable in the PIGD group for the NMSS total and miscellaneous domain scores.Conclusions: This study provides evidence of a favourable outcome of total non-motor burden in PIGD compared to tremor-dominant patients undergoing DBS for PD. These differences of clinical efficacy on non-motor aspects should be considered when advising and monitoring patients with PD undergoing DBS.Keywords: Deep brain stimulation; Nonmotor symptoms; Postural instability and gait difficulty; Quality of life; Tremor-dominant

    Chaudhuri’s Dashboard of Vitals in Parkinson’s syndrome: an unmet need underpinned by real life clinical tests

    Get PDF
    We have recently published the notion of the “vitals” of Parkinson’s, a conglomeration of signs and symptoms, largely nonmotor, that must not be missed and yet often not considered in neurological consultations, with considerable societal and personal detrimental consequences. This “dashboard,” termed the Chaudhuri’s vitals of Parkinson’s, are summarized as 5 key vital symptoms or signs and comprise of (a) motor, (b) nonmotor, (c) visual, gut, and oral health, (d) bone health and falls, and finally (e) comorbidities, comedication, and dopamine agonist side effects, such as impulse control disorders. Additionally, not addressing the vitals also may reflect inadequate management strategies, leading to worsening quality of life and diminished wellness, a new concept for people with Parkinson’s. In this paper, we discuss possible, simple to use, and clinically relevant tests that can be used to monitor the status of these vitals, so that these can be incorporated into clinical practice. We also use the term Parkinson’s syndrome to describe Parkinson’s disease, as the term “disease” is now abandoned in many countries, such as the U.K., reflecting the heterogeneity of Parkinson’s, which is now considered by many as a syndrome

    NMDA Receptor Antibodies and Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease

    Get PDF
    OBJECTIVE: N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an autoantibody-mediated neurological syndrome with prominent cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. The clinical relevance of NMDAR antibodies outside the context of encephalitis was assessed in this study. METHODS: Plasma from patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (N=108) and healthy control subjects (N=89) was screened at baseline for immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgM, and IgG NMDAR antibodies, phosphorylated tau 181 (p-tau181), and the neuroaxonal injury marker neurofilament light (NfL). Clinical assessment of the patients included measures of cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE]) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; Non-Motor Symptoms Scale for Parkinson's Disease). A subgroup of patients (N=61) was followed annually for up to 6 years. RESULTS: Ten (9%) patients with PD tested positive for NMDAR antibodies (IgA, N=5; IgM, N=6; IgG, N=0), and three (3%) healthy control subjects had IgM NMDAR antibodies; IgA NMDAR antibodies were detected significantly more commonly among patients with PD than healthy control subjects (χ2=4.23, df=1, p=0.04). Age, gender, and disease duration were not associated with NMDAR antibody positivity. Longitudinally, antibody-positive patients had significantly greater decline in annual MMSE scores when the analyses were adjusted for education, age, disease duration, p-tau181, NfL, and follow-up duration (adjusted R2=0.26, p=0.01). Neuropsychiatric symptoms were not associated with antibody status, and no associations were seen between NMDAR antibodies and p-tau181 or NfL levels. CONCLUSIONS: NMDAR antibodies were associated with greater cognitive impairment over time in patients with PD, independent of other pathological biomarkers, suggesting a potential contribution of these antibodies to cognitive decline in PD

    The Pain in Dystonia Scale (PIDS)—Development and Validation in Cervical Dystonia

    Get PDF
    BACKGROUND: A better understanding of pain in adult-onset idiopathic dystonia (AOID) is needed to implement effective therapeutic strategies. OBJECTIVE: To develop a new rating instrument for pain in AOID and validate it in cervical dystonia (CD). METHODS: Development and validation of the Pain in Dystonia Scale (PIDS) comprised three phases. In phase 1, international experts and participants with AOID generated and evaluated the preliminary items for content validity. In phase 2, the PIDS was drafted and revised by the experts, followed by cognitive interviews to ensure self-administration suitability. In phase 3, the PIDS psychometric properties were assessed in 85 participants with CD and retested in 40 participants. RESULTS: The final version of PIDS evaluates pain severity (by body-part), functional impact, and external modulating factors. Test-retest reliability showed a high-correlation coefficient for the total score (0.9, P < 0.001), and intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.7 or higher for all items in all body-parts subscores. The overall PIDS severity score showed high internal consistency (Cronbach's α, 0.9). Convergent validity analysis revealed a strong correlation between the PIDS severity score and the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale pain subscale (0.8, P < 0.001) and the Brief Pain Inventory-short form items related to pain at time of the assessment (0.7, P < 0.001) and impact of pain on daily functioning (0.7, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The PIDS is the first specific questionnaire developed to evaluate pain in all patients with AOID, here, demonstrating high-level psychometric properties in people with CD. Future work will validate PIDS in other forms of AOID. © 2023 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

    Synthesis and characterization of two self-assembled [Cu6Gd3] and [Cu5Dy2] complexes exhibiting the magnetocaloric effect, slow relaxation of magnetization, and anticancer activity

    Full text link
    Two new paths for coordination driven self-assembly reactions under the binding support of 2-((1-hydroxy-2-methylpropan-2-ylimino)methyl)-6-methoxyphenol (H2L) have been discovered from the reactions of Cu(ClO4)2·6H2O, NEt3 and GdCl3/DyCl3·6H2O in MeOH/CHCl3 (2 : 1) medium. A similar synthetic protocol is useful to provide two different types of self-aggregated molecular clusters [Cu6Gd3(L)3(HL)3(μ3-Cl)3(μ3-OH)6(OH)2]ClO4·4H2O (1) and [Cu5Dy2(L)2(HL)2(μ-Cl)2(μ3-OH)4(ClO4)2(H2O)6](ClO4)2·2NHEt3Cl·21H2O (2). The adopted reaction procedure established the importance of the HO− and Cl− ions in the mineral-like growth of the complexes, derived from solvents and metal ion salts. In the case of complex 1, one GdIII center has been trapped at the central position of the core upheld by six μ3-OH and three μ3-Cl groups, whereas for complex 2 one CuII center was trapped using four μ3-hydroxo and two μ-chlorido groups. The magnetothermal behavior of 1 has been examined for a magnetocaloric effect of −ΔSm = 11.3 J kg−1 K−1 at 2 K for ΔH = 7 T, whereas the magnetic susceptibility measurements of 2 showed slow magnetic relaxation with Ueff = 15.8 K and τ0 = 9.8 × 10−7 s in zero external dc field. Cancer cell growth inhibition studies proved the potential of both the complexes with interestingly high activity for the Cu6Gd3 complex against human lung cancer cells. Both complexes 1 and 2 also exhibited DNA and human serum albumin (HSA) binding abilities in relation to the involved binding sites and thermodynamics.</p

    Addressing the gap for racially diverse research involvement:The King's model for minority ethnic research participant recruitment

    No full text
    Objectives: Ethnic minorities (EM) are still underrepresented in research recruitment. Despite wide literature outlining the barriers, enablers and recommendations for driving inclusion and diversity in research, there is still little evidence for successful diversity in research participation, which has a direct impact on the quality of care provided to ethnically diverse individuals. A new, comprehensive approach to recruitment strategies is therefore necessary. Study design: service improvement initiative. Methods: In the light of the Covid-19 pandemic and the key public health need to address the disparity in care provided to non-white populations, we used a novel, comprehensive approach (The King's Model) comprising of local and community actions to promote inclusive research recruitment. We then compared rates of diverse recruitment in studies where the novel approach, was applied to studies which had been closed to recruitment at the time of analysis and where ethnicity data was available. Results: Our results demonstrate that following the introduction of the King's Model for diverse recruitment, commercial interventional study diverse recruitment increased from 6.4% to 16.1%, and for non-commercial studies, from 30.2% to 41.0% and 59.2% in the selected studies. Conclusions: King's Model is potentially a useful tool in enhancing non-Caucasian recruitment to clinical research. Enriched by additional recommendations based on our experiences during the Covid-19 research recruitment drive, we propose the King's Model is used to support ethnically diverse research recruitment. Further evidence is needed to replicate our findings, although this preliminary evidence provides granular details necessary to address the key unmet need of validating clinical research outcomes in non-white populations

    NMDA Receptor Antibodies and Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease

    No full text
    OBJECTIVE: N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an autoantibody-mediated neurological syndrome with prominent cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. The clinical relevance of NMDAR antibodies outside the context of encephalitis was assessed in this study. METHODS: Plasma from patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (N=108) and healthy control subjects (N=89) was screened at baseline for immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgM, and IgG NMDAR antibodies, phosphorylated tau 181 (p-tau181), and the neuroaxonal injury marker neurofilament light (NfL). Clinical assessment of the patients included measures of cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE]) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; Non-Motor Symptoms Scale for Parkinson's Disease). A subgroup of patients (N=61) was followed annually for up to 6 years. RESULTS: Ten (9%) patients with PD tested positive for NMDAR antibodies (IgA, N=5; IgM, N=6; IgG, N=0), and three (3%) healthy control subjects had IgM NMDAR antibodies; IgA NMDAR antibodies were detected significantly more commonly among patients with PD than healthy control subjects (χ2=4.23, df=1, p=0.04). Age, gender, and disease duration were not associated with NMDAR antibody positivity. Longitudinally, antibody-positive patients had significantly greater decline in annual MMSE scores when the analyses were adjusted for education, age, disease duration, p-tau181, NfL, and follow-up duration (adjusted R2=0.26, p=0.01). Neuropsychiatric symptoms were not associated with antibody status, and no associations were seen between NMDAR antibodies and p-tau181 or NfL levels. CONCLUSIONS: NMDAR antibodies were associated with greater cognitive impairment over time in patients with PD, independent of other pathological biomarkers, suggesting a potential contribution of these antibodies to cognitive decline in PD.</p

    SARS-CoV-2 and Parkinson’s Disease: A Review of Where We Are Now

    No full text
    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has been discussed in the context of Parkinson’s disease (PD) over the last three years. Now that we are entering the long-term phase of this pandemic, we are intrigued to look back and see how and why the community of patients with PD was impacted and what knowledge we have collected so far. The relationship between COVID-19 and PD is likely multifactorial in nature. Similar to other systemic infections, a probable worsening of PD symptoms secondary to COVID-19, either transient or persistent (long COVID), has been demonstrated, while the COVID-19-related mortality of PD patients may be increased compared to the general population. These observations could be attributed to direct or indirect damage from SARS-CoV-2 in the central nervous system (CNS) or could result from general infection-related parameters (e.g., hospitalization or drugs) and the sequelae of the COVID-19 pandemic (e.g., quarantine). A growing number of cases of new-onset parkinsonism or PD following SARS-CoV-2 infection have been reported, either closely (post-infectious) or remotely (para-infectious) after a COVID-19 diagnosis, although such a link remains hypothetical. The pathophysiological substrate of these phenomena remains elusive; however, research studies, particularly pathology studies, have suggested various COVID-19-induced degenerative changes with potential associations with PD/parkinsonism. We review the literature to date for answers considering the relationship between SARS-CoV-2 infection and PD/parkinsonism, examining pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, vaccination, and future directions
    corecore