29 research outputs found

    Fibrin glue and transanal rectal advancement flap for high transsphincteric perianal fistulas; is there any advantage?

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    BACKGROUNDS AND AIM: In recent decades, fibrin glue has appeared as an alternative treatment for high perianal fistulas. Early results seemed promising, with high success rates being reported. However, with increasing follow-up, the enthusiasm was tempered because of disappointing results. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the additional value of fibrin glue in combination with transanal advancement flap, compared to advancement flap alone, for the treatment of high transsphincteric fistulas of cryptoglandular origin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 1995 and January 2006, 127 patients were operated for high perianal fistulas with an advancement flap. After exclusion of patients with inflammatory bowel disease or HIV, 80 patients remained. A consecutive series of 26 patients had an advancement flap combined with obliteration of the fistula tract with fibrin glue. Patients were matched for prior fistula surgery, and the advancement was performed identically in all patients. In the fibrin glue group, glue was installed retrogradely in the fistula tract after the advancement was completed and the fistula tract had been curetted. RESULTS: Minimal follow-up after surgery was 13 months [median of 67 months (range, 13-127)]. The overall recurrence rate was 26% (n=21). Recurrence rates for advancement flap alone vs the combination with glue were 13% vs 56% (p=0.014) in the group without previous fistula surgery and 23% vs 41% (p=0.216) in the group with previous fistula surgery. CONCLUSION: Obliterating the fistula tract with fibrin glue was associated with worse outcome after rectal advancement flap for high perianal fistula

    Can the outcome of pelvic-floor rehabilitation in patients with fecal incontinence be predicted?

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    Purpose: Pelvic-floor rehabilitation does not provide the same degree of relief in all fecal incontinent patients. We aimed at studying prospectively the ability of tests to predict the outcome of pelvic-floor rehabilitation in patients with fecal incontinence. Materials and methods: Two hundred fifty consecutive patients (228 women) underwent medical history and a standardized series of tests, including physical examination, anal manometry, pudendal nerve latency testing, anal sensitivity testing, rectal capacity measurement, defecography, endoanal sonography, and endoanal magnetic resonance imaging. Subsequently, patients were referred for pelvic-floor rehabilitation. Outcome of pelvic-floor rehabilitation was quantified by the Vaizey incontinence score. Linear regression analyses were used to identify candidate predictors and to construct a multivariable prediction model for the posttreatment Vaizey score. Results: After pelvic-floor rehabilitation, the mean baseline Vaizey score (18, SD±3) was reduced with 3.2 points (p<0.001). In addition to the baseline Vaizey score, three elements from medical history were significantly associated with the posttreatment Vaizey score (presence of passive incontinence, thin stool consistency, primary repair of a rupture after vaginal delivery at childbed) (R2, 0.18). Th

    Surgery for isolated lung metastasis in two patients with bladder cancer

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    Two patients presented with an isolated pulmonary lesion on routine x-ray of the thorax almost 2 years after treatment of bladder cancer. Needle biopsy showed squamous cell carcinoma in the first patient but did not classify the lesion in the second patient. No evidence of extrapulmonary disease was found. Lobectomy was performed. Pathologic examination showed similar histologic and immunohistochemical characteristics as the primary bladder carcinoma. Postoperatively, it was decided not to give chemotherapy. One patient died 6 months postoperatively and 1 patient was alive 27 months after metastasectomy without evidence of diseas

    A Challenging Problem

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