16 research outputs found

    Skupni nalaz rimskog kasnocarskog bakrenog novca s lokaliteta Gospin otok u Solinu

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    Numidian and Roman coins from the Plešivica-sedlo site

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    NUMIZMATIČKE VIJESTI IZ SENJA I OKOLICE

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    This article gives a survey of part of the numismatic collection of the Municipal Museum of Senj. The City of Senj — the antique Senia which was founded probably by the end of the bronze age — is known for its continual, and uninterrupted existence as an impontant port and a well-known commercial center, so it is no wonder that this City is also as ,a rich findingplace of coins. Though on the broader precincts of the town quite a numerous quantity of coins was found, unfortunately the present collection of the Municipal Museum is not by its number of coins thoroughly completed, but il still covers all money which was circulating in these regions through all historical periods. A very important document of types of coins found in the City of Senj and its wider surroundings is a list of coins prepared in the year 1889 by the professor of the Gymnasium of Senj Vinko Žanić. He has specified all coins which were located on the broader precincts of the City and these coins were the basis of which he started a Collection of the Gimnasium, as it was usual at that time in many towns (Vinkovci, Dubrovnik, Zagreb and others). As this Collection got lost in an unknown manner by the end of World War II., /this list became for the City of Senj very essential. The formation of a numismatic collection in the Municipal Museum started only a few years ago, but it covers already at the present time all regions in the same manner al did the former collection of the Gymnasium though to a smaller extent. The oldest coin is a bronze coin from Carthago (Miiller III. Peć 62) and then there is only one Roman Republican Denar, and quite a number of coins from the Roman Empire, and part of coins from the Middle Ages, which material will be treated in the second part of the numismatic news from Senj and its furroundings. In the article — as a parallel — there are mentioned also the coins which were found on the territory of Senj and its surroundings but which are at present in the Numismatic Collection of the Archeological Museum of Zagreb

    The aureus of Quintus Cornuficius

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    Roman savings box from Sisak

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    The aureus of Quintus Cornuficius

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    Some notable strikes of the Diocletianic tetrarchy in the Zagreb Archaeological museum

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    Etruscan and Umbrian coins from the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb

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    Rane emisije farske kovnice iz Remetinog vrta u Starom Gradu na Hvaru

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    NUMISMATIC DATA FROM SENJ AND ITS SURROUNDINGS

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    U ovom radu autori obrađuju pojedinačne i skupne nalaze starog novca senjske regije. To je nastavak i dopuna rada objavljenog od. 1975. u Senjskom zborniku. Sada je uključen numizmatički materijal koji se skoro isključivo čuva u numizmatičkoj zbirci Arheološkog muzeja u Zagrebu i to sa lokaliteta: Cesarica, Drežnica, Jablanac, Jurjevo, Karlobag, Lopar, Modruš, Novi Vinodolski, Senj, Starigrad, Stinica i Sv. Ilija. Ostave su, ukoliko ih ima u kataloškom dijelu opisane na prvom mjestu, a posebno su opisani i pojedinačni primjerci. Najstariji novac registriran na senjskom području je rimski republikanski sextans iz 3. st. p. n. e. i ulomak aes rude, kasnije je u opticaju rimski republikanski novac od srebra. Imade i nekoliko primjeraka afričkog novca 2. st. p. n. e. Najbolje je zastupljen rimski carski novac od 1. st., pa sve do druge polovice 4. st., dok novca 5. st. skoro uopče i nema. Bizantskog novca poznajemo vrlo malo.The very first attempt in order to compile a numismatic topography of the Senj area, but also including finds from other regions of Croatia, was made in 1889, when I. V. Žanić (1852—1920) published a detailed description of his coin collection. His efforts were pursued by Z. Dukat and A. Glavičić in 1975 in an article which showed the numismatic topography as seen when coin finds srom the Žanić collection were presented together with more recent finds from the local museum at Senj and some of the material kept in the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb. The present article is entirely based upon the coins from the Zagreb Collection. Among the treasure-troves five are listed, the most ancient being the Cesarica Hoard of 1936, buried under Tiberius, which is being published in detail elsewhere. At Karlo-bag to more Ancient hoards have been undug, but with insignificant, almost unidentifiable contents. The Novi Vinodolski Treasure contained French silver of the 11th cent, and is known in the literature in spite of its extremely reduced contents. In 1934 a hoard containing silver denarii of the Patriarchs of Aquileia was unearthed at Senj. Finally, a poor man\u27s savings consisting almost entirely of Go-rician soldi of the 18 th cent, was discovered near Sv. Ilija. The individual coin finds give us an incomplete picture of money circulation in the area, because they are all fortuitous and ended up in the Zagreb Collection by accident. They do not represent a systematical collecting of material from a certain site. Among the sites Karlobag has produced most of the coins, and is being followed by Senj and Stinica. On the whole, twelve sites are represented. The earliest coins are a Roman Republican sextans from the 3rd cent. B. C. (Jur-jevo Б, 1) and a fragment of aes rude discovered by Josip Brunšmid at Karlobag (B, 2). Later on, more Roman Republican money was in circulation, particularly silver (Cesarica A; Karlobag B, 3—6). There are also several African specimens present: Carthaginian (Karlobag B, I) and Numidian bronze of the second cent. B. C. (Drvišica B, 1; Starigrad B, 2—10). Roman Imperial coins particularly of the first century, are well represented. From the 1st to the 3rd cents. A. D. almost all money arrived from the mint of Rome or some other Western mints, but in the late 3rd and in the 4th cents., as it seems, coins from the Eastern mints of the Empire began to be brought into the Senj area in more considerable quantities. There are almost no coins of the 5th cent., whereas of the Byzantine let us mention two gold pieces of Tiberius II Constantine (578—582) from Cesarica (B, I) and Jur-jevo (B, 8), one bronze of Justinian (527—565) and three more of Justin II (565—578) from Karlobag (B, 29—32). Among the more recent material, leut us only point out a Slavonian denarius struck by the banns Stjepan Babonić (1310—1316) at the mint of Zagreb, which strayed away from its usual monetary province
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