13 research outputs found

    Synthesis of 12-Connected Three-Dimensional Covalent Organic Framework with lnj Topology

    No full text
    The structural exploration of three-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (3D COFs) is of great significance to the development of COF materials. Different from structurally diverse MOFs, which have a variety of connectivity (3–24), now the valency of 3D COFs is limited to only 4, 6, and 8. Therefore, the exploration of organic building blocks with higher connectivity is a necessary path to broaden the scope of 3D COF structures. Herein, for the first time, we have designed and synthesized a 12-connected triptycene-based precursor (triptycene-12-CHO) with 12 symmetrical distributions of aldehyde groups, which is also the highest valency reported until now. Based on this unique 12-connected structure, we have successfully prepared a novel 3D COF with lnj topology (termed 3D-lnj-COF). The as-synthesized 3D COF exhibits honeycomb main pores and permanent porosity with a Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area of 1159.6 m2 g–1. This work not only provides a strategy for synthesizing precursors with a high connectivity but also provides inspiration for enriching the variety of 3D COFs

    Sensitivity analysis of meta-analysis.

    No full text
    Background and aimImplantable cardiac monitors (ICM) can facilitate the detection of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation episodes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether ICM can prevent stroke in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke.MethodsThis study included randomized controlled trials comparing ICM with conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. We searched Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL from inception until January 5, 2022, without language restriction. Quantitative pooling of the data was undertaken using a random-effects model. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke at the longest follow-up.ResultsFour trials comprising 7237 patients were included. ICM was significantly associated with decreased risk of ischemic stroke (RR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59–0.97; moderate-quality evidence) in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. ICM was associated with higher detection of atrial fibrillation (RR 4.21, 95% CI 2.26–7.85) and use of oral anticoagulants (RR 2.29, 95% CI 2.07–2.55).ConclusionsICM results in a significantly lower risk of ischemic stroke than conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. Due to the clinical heterogeneity of study population and limited related studies, more trials were needed to furtherly explore the topic in patients with prior stroke or high risk of stroke.</div

    Excluded studies after full-text review.

    No full text
    Background and aimImplantable cardiac monitors (ICM) can facilitate the detection of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation episodes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether ICM can prevent stroke in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke.MethodsThis study included randomized controlled trials comparing ICM with conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. We searched Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL from inception until January 5, 2022, without language restriction. Quantitative pooling of the data was undertaken using a random-effects model. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke at the longest follow-up.ResultsFour trials comprising 7237 patients were included. ICM was significantly associated with decreased risk of ischemic stroke (RR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59–0.97; moderate-quality evidence) in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. ICM was associated with higher detection of atrial fibrillation (RR 4.21, 95% CI 2.26–7.85) and use of oral anticoagulants (RR 2.29, 95% CI 2.07–2.55).ConclusionsICM results in a significantly lower risk of ischemic stroke than conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. Due to the clinical heterogeneity of study population and limited related studies, more trials were needed to furtherly explore the topic in patients with prior stroke or high risk of stroke.</div

    Risk of bias graph.

    No full text
    Background and aimImplantable cardiac monitors (ICM) can facilitate the detection of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation episodes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether ICM can prevent stroke in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke.MethodsThis study included randomized controlled trials comparing ICM with conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. We searched Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL from inception until January 5, 2022, without language restriction. Quantitative pooling of the data was undertaken using a random-effects model. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke at the longest follow-up.ResultsFour trials comprising 7237 patients were included. ICM was significantly associated with decreased risk of ischemic stroke (RR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59–0.97; moderate-quality evidence) in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. ICM was associated with higher detection of atrial fibrillation (RR 4.21, 95% CI 2.26–7.85) and use of oral anticoagulants (RR 2.29, 95% CI 2.07–2.55).ConclusionsICM results in a significantly lower risk of ischemic stroke than conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. Due to the clinical heterogeneity of study population and limited related studies, more trials were needed to furtherly explore the topic in patients with prior stroke or high risk of stroke.</div

    Fig 3 -

    No full text
    Background and aimImplantable cardiac monitors (ICM) can facilitate the detection of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation episodes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether ICM can prevent stroke in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke.MethodsThis study included randomized controlled trials comparing ICM with conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. We searched Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL from inception until January 5, 2022, without language restriction. Quantitative pooling of the data was undertaken using a random-effects model. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke at the longest follow-up.ResultsFour trials comprising 7237 patients were included. ICM was significantly associated with decreased risk of ischemic stroke (RR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59–0.97; moderate-quality evidence) in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. ICM was associated with higher detection of atrial fibrillation (RR 4.21, 95% CI 2.26–7.85) and use of oral anticoagulants (RR 2.29, 95% CI 2.07–2.55).ConclusionsICM results in a significantly lower risk of ischemic stroke than conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. Due to the clinical heterogeneity of study population and limited related studies, more trials were needed to furtherly explore the topic in patients with prior stroke or high risk of stroke.</div

    Fig 1 -

    No full text
    Background and aimImplantable cardiac monitors (ICM) can facilitate the detection of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation episodes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether ICM can prevent stroke in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke.MethodsThis study included randomized controlled trials comparing ICM with conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. We searched Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL from inception until January 5, 2022, without language restriction. Quantitative pooling of the data was undertaken using a random-effects model. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke at the longest follow-up.ResultsFour trials comprising 7237 patients were included. ICM was significantly associated with decreased risk of ischemic stroke (RR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59–0.97; moderate-quality evidence) in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. ICM was associated with higher detection of atrial fibrillation (RR 4.21, 95% CI 2.26–7.85) and use of oral anticoagulants (RR 2.29, 95% CI 2.07–2.55).ConclusionsICM results in a significantly lower risk of ischemic stroke than conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. Due to the clinical heterogeneity of study population and limited related studies, more trials were needed to furtherly explore the topic in patients with prior stroke or high risk of stroke.</div

    Summary of findings and strength of evidence.

    No full text
    Background and aimImplantable cardiac monitors (ICM) can facilitate the detection of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation episodes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether ICM can prevent stroke in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke.MethodsThis study included randomized controlled trials comparing ICM with conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. We searched Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL from inception until January 5, 2022, without language restriction. Quantitative pooling of the data was undertaken using a random-effects model. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke at the longest follow-up.ResultsFour trials comprising 7237 patients were included. ICM was significantly associated with decreased risk of ischemic stroke (RR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59–0.97; moderate-quality evidence) in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. ICM was associated with higher detection of atrial fibrillation (RR 4.21, 95% CI 2.26–7.85) and use of oral anticoagulants (RR 2.29, 95% CI 2.07–2.55).ConclusionsICM results in a significantly lower risk of ischemic stroke than conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. Due to the clinical heterogeneity of study population and limited related studies, more trials were needed to furtherly explore the topic in patients with prior stroke or high risk of stroke.</div

    Search strategy.

    No full text
    Background and aimImplantable cardiac monitors (ICM) can facilitate the detection of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation episodes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether ICM can prevent stroke in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke.MethodsThis study included randomized controlled trials comparing ICM with conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. We searched Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL from inception until January 5, 2022, without language restriction. Quantitative pooling of the data was undertaken using a random-effects model. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke at the longest follow-up.ResultsFour trials comprising 7237 patients were included. ICM was significantly associated with decreased risk of ischemic stroke (RR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59–0.97; moderate-quality evidence) in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. ICM was associated with higher detection of atrial fibrillation (RR 4.21, 95% CI 2.26–7.85) and use of oral anticoagulants (RR 2.29, 95% CI 2.07–2.55).ConclusionsICM results in a significantly lower risk of ischemic stroke than conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. Due to the clinical heterogeneity of study population and limited related studies, more trials were needed to furtherly explore the topic in patients with prior stroke or high risk of stroke.</div

    Subgroup analysis of meta-analysis.

    No full text
    Background and aimImplantable cardiac monitors (ICM) can facilitate the detection of asymptomatic atrial fibrillation episodes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether ICM can prevent stroke in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke.MethodsThis study included randomized controlled trials comparing ICM with conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. We searched Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL from inception until January 5, 2022, without language restriction. Quantitative pooling of the data was undertaken using a random-effects model. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke at the longest follow-up.ResultsFour trials comprising 7237 patients were included. ICM was significantly associated with decreased risk of ischemic stroke (RR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59–0.97; moderate-quality evidence) in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. ICM was associated with higher detection of atrial fibrillation (RR 4.21, 95% CI 2.26–7.85) and use of oral anticoagulants (RR 2.29, 95% CI 2.07–2.55).ConclusionsICM results in a significantly lower risk of ischemic stroke than conventional (non-ICM) external cardiac monitoring in patients with prior stroke and risk factors for stroke. Due to the clinical heterogeneity of study population and limited related studies, more trials were needed to furtherly explore the topic in patients with prior stroke or high risk of stroke.</div
    corecore