272 research outputs found

    Additional file 2: of Phylogenomic analysis reveals genome-wide purifying selection on TBE transposons in the ciliate Oxytricha

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    Number of 42kD, 22kD and 57kD ORFs included in the pairwise dN/dS analysis. (XLSX 38.5 kb

    Additional file 1: of Phylogenomic analysis reveals genome-wide purifying selection on TBE transposons in the ciliate Oxytricha

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    Annotation of TBE sequences in Oxytricha micronuclear genome in gff format. (GFF 2.38 mb

    Silica-Coated Mn-Doped CsPb(Cl/Br)<sub>3</sub> Inorganic Perovskite Quantum Dots: Exciton-to-Mn Energy Transfer and Blue-Excitable Solid-State Lighting

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    Tunability of emitting colors of perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) was generally realized via composition/size modulation. Due to their bandgap absorption and ionic crystal features, the mixing of multiple PQDs inevitably suffers from reabsorption and anion-exchange effects. Herein, we address these issues with high-content Mn<sup>2+</sup>-doped CsPbCl<sub>3</sub> PQDs that can yield blue-excitable orange Mn<sup>2+</sup> emission benefited from exciton-to-Mn energy transfer and Cl-to-Br anion exchange. Silica-coating was applied to improve air stability of PQDs, suppress the loss of Mn<sup>2+</sup>, and avoid anion-exchange between different PQDs. As a direct benefit of intense multicolor emissions from Mn<sup>2+</sup>-doped PQD@SiO<sub>2</sub> solid phosphors, a prototype white light-emitting diode with excellent optical performance and superior light stability was constructed using green CsPbBr<sub>3</sub>@SiO<sub>2</sub> and orange Mn: CsPb­(Cl/Br)<sub>3</sub>@SiO<sub>2</sub> composites as color converters, verifying their potential applications in the field of optoelectronics

    Joint Network Reconstruction and Community Detection from Rich but Noisy Data

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    Most empirical studies of complex networks return rich but noisy data, as they measure the network structure repeatedly but with substantial errors due to indirect measurements. In this article, we propose a novel framework, called the group-based binary mixture (GBM) modeling approach, to simultaneously conduct network reconstruction and community detection from such rich but noisy data. A generalized expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is developed for computing the maximum likelihood estimates, and an information criterion is introduced to consistently select the number of communities. The strong consistency properties of the network reconstruction and community detection are established under some assumption on the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence, and in particular, we do not impose assumptions on the true network structure. It is shown that joint reconstruction with community detection has a synergistic effect, whereby actually detecting communities can improve the accuracy of the reconstruction. Finally, we illustrate the performance of the approach with numerical simulations and two real examples. Supplementary materials for this article are available online.</p

    Full-Spectral Fine-Tuning Visible Emissions from Cation Hybrid Cs<sub>1–<i>m</i></sub>FA<i><sub>m</sub></i>PbX<sub>3</sub> (X = Cl, Br, and I, 0 ≤ <i>m</i> ≤ 1) Quantum Dots

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    Full-color visible emissions are particularly crucial for applications in displays and lightings. In this work, we developed a facile room-temperature ligand-assisted supersaturated recrystallization synthesis of monodisperse, cubic structure Cs<sub>1–<i>m</i></sub>FA<i><sub>m</sub></i>PbX<sub>3</sub> (X = Cl, Br, and I or their mixtures Cl/Br and Br/I, 0 ≤ <i>m</i> ≤ 1) hybrid perovskite quantum dots (QDs). Impressively, cation substitution of Cs<sup>+</sup> by FA<sup>+</sup> was beneficial in finely tuning the band gap and in exciton recombination kinetics, improving the structural stability, and raising the absolute quantum yields up to 85%. With further assistance of anion replacement, full-spectral visible emissions in the wavelength range of 450–750 nm; narrow full width at half-maxima, and a wide color gamut, encompassing 130% of National Television System Committee television color standard, were achieved. Finally, Cs<sub>1–<i>m</i></sub>FA<i><sub>m</sub></i>PbX<sub>3</sub>-polymer films retaining multicolor luminescence are prepared and a prototype white light-emitting diode device was constructed using green Cs<sub>0.1</sub>FA<sub>0.9</sub>PbBr<sub>3</sub> and red Cs<sub>0.1</sub>FA<sub>0.9</sub>Br<sub>1.5</sub>I<sub>1.5</sub> QDs as color converters, certainly suggesting their potential applications in the optoelectronics field

    Table1_TFRC–RNA interactions show the regulation of gene expression and alternative splicing associated with IgAN in human renal tubule mesangial cells.pdf

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    Introduction: IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerular disease (PGD) which could progress to renal failure and is characterized by aberrant IgA immune complex deposition. Transferrin receptor1 (TFRC), an IgA receptor, is a potential RNA binding protein (RBP) which regulates expression of genes positively associated with the cell cycle and proliferation and is involved in IgAN. Molecular mechanisms by which TFRC affects IgAN development remain unclear.Methods: In this study, TFRC was overexpressed in human renal tubular mesangial cells (HRMCs) and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) and improved RNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (iRIP-seq) were performed. The aim was to identify potential RNA targets of TFRC at transcriptional and alternative splicing (AS) levels.Results: TFRC-regulated AS genes were enriched in mRNA splicing and DNA repair, consistent with global changes due to TFRC overexpression (TFRC-OE). Expression of TFRC-regulated genes potentially associated with IgAN, including CENPH, FOXM1, KIFC1, TOP2A, FABP4, ID1, KIF20A, ATF3, H19, IRF7, and H1-2, and with AS, CYGB, MCM7 and HNRNPH1, were investigated by RT-qPCR and iRIP-seq data analyzed to identify TFRC-bound RNA targets. RCC1 and RPPH1 were found to be TFRC-bound RNA targets involved in cell proliferation.Discussion: In conclusion, molecular TFRC targets were identified in HRMCs and TFRC found to regulate gene transcription and AS. TFRC is considered to have potential as a clinical therapeutic target.</p

    Potential errors for <i>cytb</i> sequences in Insectivora and Chiroptera.

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    <p>Potential errors for <i>cytb</i> sequences in Insectivora and Chiroptera.</p
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